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American Rescue Plan Tax Credits Available to Small Employers May 5, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : COVID, Deductions, General, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

The Internal Revenue Service and the Treasury Department announced recently further details of tax credits available under the American Rescue Plan to help small businesses, including providing paid leave for employees receiving COVID-19 vaccinations.

The additional details, provided in a fact sheet released recently, spell out some basic facts about the employers eligible for the tax credits. It also provides information on how these employers may claim the credit for leave paid to employees related to COVID-19 vaccinations.

Eligible employers, such as businesses and tax-exempt organizations with fewer than 500 employees and certain governmental employers, can receive a tax credit for providing paid time off for each employee receiving the vaccine and for any time needed to recover from the vaccine. For example, if an eligible employer offers employees a paid day off in order to get vaccinated, the employer can receive a tax credit equal to the wages paid to employees for that day (up to certain limits).

“This new information is a shot in the arm for struggling small employers who are working hard to keep their businesses going while also watching out for the health of their employees,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. “Our work on this issue is part of a larger effort by the IRS to assist the nation recovering from the pandemic.”

The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARP) allows small and midsize employers, and certain governmental employers, to claim refundable tax credits that reimburse them for the cost of providing paid sick and family leave to their employees due to COVID-19, including leave taken by employees to receive or recover from COVID-19 vaccinations. Self-employed individuals are eligible for similar tax credits.

The ARP tax credits are available to eligible employers that pay sick and family leave for leave from April 1, 2021, through Sept. 30, 2021.

The paid leave credits under the ARP are tax credits against the employer’s share of the Medicare tax. The tax credits are refundable, which means that the employer is entitled to payment of the full amount of the credits if it exceeds the employer’s share of the Medicare tax.

In anticipation of claiming the credits on the Form 941, Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return, eligible employers can keep the federal employment taxes that they otherwise would have deposited, including federal income tax withheld from employees, the employees’ share of social security and Medicare taxes and the eligible employer’s share of social security and Medicare taxes with respect to all employees up to the amount of credit for which they are eligible. If the eligible employer does not have enough federal employment taxes on deposit to cover the amount of the anticipated credits, the eligible employer may request an advance by filing Form 7200, Advance Payment of Employer Credits Due to COVID-19.

Self-employed individuals may claim comparable credits on the Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return.

More details are available on this fact sheet.

Published on the IRS website April 21, 2021.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Bobbie Haines

–until next week.

Premium Tax Credit Repayments Suspended April 28, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Healthcare, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes , add a comment

The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 suspends the requirement that taxpayers increase their tax liability by all or a portion of their excess advance payments of the Premium Tax Credit (excess APTC) for tax year 2020. A taxpayer’s excess APTC is the amount by which the taxpayer’s advance payments of the Premium Tax Credit (APTC) exceed his or her Premium Tax Credit (PTC).

The Internal Revenue Service announced today that taxpayers with excess APTC for 2020 are not required to file Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit, or report an excess advance Premium Tax Credit repayment on their 2020 Form 1040 or Form 1040-SR, Schedule 2, Line 2, when they file.

Eligible taxpayers may claim a PTC for health insurance coverage in a qualified health plan purchased through a Health Insurance Marketplace. Taxpayers use Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit to figure the amount of their PTC and reconcile it with their APTC. This computation lets taxpayers know whether they must increase their tax liability by all or a portion of their excess APTC, called an excess advance Premium Tax Credit repayment, or may claim a net PTC.

Taxpayers can check with their tax professional or use tax software to figure the amount of allowable PTC and reconcile it with APTC received using the information from Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement.

The process remains unchanged for taxpayers claiming a net PTC for 2020. They must file Form 8962 when they file their 2020 tax return. See the Instructions for Form 8962 for more information. Taxpayers claiming a net PTC should respond to an IRS notice asking for more information to finish processing their tax return.

Taxpayers who have already filed their 2020 tax return and who have excess APTC for 2020 do not need to file an amended tax return or contact the IRS. The IRS will reduce the excess APTC repayment amount to zero with no further action needed by the taxpayer. The IRS will reimburse people who have already repaid any excess advance Premium Tax Credit on their 2020 tax return. Taxpayers who received a letter about a missing Form 8962 should disregard the letter if they have excess APTC for 2020. The IRS will process tax returns without Form 8962 for tax year 2020 by reducing the excess advance premium tax credit repayment amount to zero.

Again, IRS is taking steps to reimburse people who filed Form 8962, reported, and paid an excess advance Premium Tax Credit repayment amount with their 2020 tax return before the recent legislative changes were made. Taxpayers in this situation should not file an amended return solely to get a refund of this amount. The IRS will provide more details on IRS.gov. There is no need to file an amended tax return or contact the IRS.

As a reminder, this change applies only to reconciling tax year 2020 APTC. Taxpayers who received the benefit of APTC prior to 2020 must file Form 8962 to reconcile their APTC and PTC for the pre-2020 year when they file their federal income tax return even if they otherwise are not required to file a tax return for that year. The IRS continues to process prior year tax returns and correspond for missing information. If the IRS sends a letter about a 2019 Form 8962, they need more information from the taxpayer to finish processing their tax return. Taxpayers should respond to the letter so that the IRS can finish processing the tax return and, if applicable, issue any refund the taxpayer may be due.

See the  Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit and Fact Sheet 2021-08, More details about changes for taxpayers who received advance payments of the 2020 Premium Tax Credit.

Published on the IRS website April 9, 2021.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Bobbie Haines

–until next week.

The New Child Tax Credit April 21, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

When President Joe Biden signed the $1.9 trillion-dollar American Rescue Plan last month, he launched a new and improved Child Tax Credit. The Child Tax Credit has been around since the Clinton Administration, yet this new version may have a positive effect on Americans who have been trying to find financial stability through the Covid-19 pandemic.

As with all new legislation, there are a lot of moving parts. From determining income requirements to who is a qualifying child, it is a dizzying array of details to determine which taxpayers will be allowed to take the credit. 

Here is what we know so far:

The Credit Is a Monthly Payment In 2021

The new Child Tax Credit is currently for 2021 only.  For families that qualify, it will be a $3,600 credit for each child under age 6. For children ages 6 to 17, the credit is $3,000. The big difference from previous year is that half of the credit will pay out monthly from July through December.

In each of those months, the IRS will deposit the Child Tax Credit into taxpayers’ bank accounts – $300 for each child under age 6 and $250 for each child ages 6 to 17.

The remaining half of the credit will then be an adjustment – a “true up”- on the 2021 income tax return to be filed in April of 2022.

For dependents over 18, the credit will be $500.

It Is Income Based and There Is A Phase Out

Like the stimulus checks for the Covid-19 pandemic, the new Child Tax Credit will be based on adjusted gross income (In each of those months, the IRS will deposit the Child Tax Credit into taxpayers’ bank accounts – $300 for each child under age 6 and $250 for each child ages 6 to 17.

The remaining half of the credit will then be an adjustment – a “true up”- on the 2021 income tax return to be filed in April of 2022.GI). For single taxpayers, that is an AGI of $75,000 or less. For head of household, that is an AGI of $112,500 or less. Finally, for those filing married filing joint, it is an AGI of $150,000 or less.

But keep in mind that the credit is subject to a phase out. That means for every $1,000 a taxpayer earns over the AGI limit, their credit will be reduced by $50. For instance, if the taxpayer is a single filer with an AGI of $85,000, their credit will be reduced by $500 per child.

How to Qualify

The new Child Tax Credit is a 2021 tax credit, which means it will be based on your 2021 income. However, in order to quickly begin providing relief to taxpayers, the IRS will look at your 2020 income tax, as they did with the stimulus programs. If the taxpayer has not yet filed for 2020, they will look back to the 2019 return. One benefit for many taxpayers is that they still have until May 17, 2021 to file their tax return without an extension, which also gives them an additional opportunity to provide the IRS with direct deposit instructions.

As this is an AGI-based program, if a taxpayer’s 2020 income is within the AGI to qualify, but their 2021 income exceeds the limitations and phase out, the taxpayer will need to pay back the credit on their 2021 tax return.

The IRS Is Embracing Technology

While the new credit might be straightforward for some families, it won’t be for others. Situations where a new baby is born, a divorce occurs or a family might have too high an income in 2021 create challenges. While the IRS initially indicated that getting a portal set up in time for the July 1st launch was unlikely, in comments to the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday, April 13th, IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig stated that, “We will launch by July 1 with the absolute best product we are able to put together.”

As a result, for taxpayers that have unique situations, they should keep an eye out for the new IRS portal to open so they can enter key data in regards to the tax credit.

Unique Situations Where A Child Hits Age Threshold

As the program is based on AGI and age, there will be situations where a child changes age groups during 2021. As a result, taxpayers will need to consider the child’s age on December 31, 2021. For instance, if a taxpayer’s 5-year-old turns 6 before the end of the year, they will qualify for the $3,000 credit not the $3,600. Similarly, if a 17-year-old turns 18 before December 31, 2021, they will only receive a $500 credit instead of $3,000.

The Existing Child Tax Credit Is Still Available

There will be many taxpayers who will not qualify for the new Child Tax Credit. However, keep in mind, the Child Tax Credit that was established in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA), will still be available. This is a tax credit for single taxpayers with an AGI of $200,000 or less or taxpayers filing married with an AGI of $400,000 or less. This group of taxpayers will still qualify for a $2,000 tax credit for each child under age 17.

Keep in mind this group might also need to access the portal if their 2020 income would have them qualify for the higher credit.

More to Come

As we get closer to the July 1 rollout date, more details on the plan will be available, along with the IRS portal. In the meantime, taxpayers should focus on filing their 2020 income tax return as well as estimating their 2021 income to make sure that they qualify for this tax credit. It may be prudent to seek the help of a professional or use one of the new Child Tax Credit calculators that are available.

Credit Given to:  Megan Gorman. This article was published in Forbes on April 14, 2021.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Bobbie Haines

–until next week.

IRS to Issue Refunds for Unemployment Benefits April 14, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, tax changes, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Normally, any unemployment compensation someone receives is taxable. However, a recent law change allows some recipients to not pay tax on some 2020 unemployment compensation.

The IRS will automatically refund money to eligible people who filed their tax return reporting unemployment compensation before the recent changes made by the American Rescue Plan. These refunds are expected to begin in May and continue into the summer.

Under the new law, taxpayers who earned less than $150,000 in modified adjusted gross income can exclude some unemployment compensation from their income. This means they don’t have to pay tax on some of it. People who are married filing jointly can exclude up to $20,400 – up to $10,200 for each spouse who received unemployment compensation. All other eligible taxpayers can exclude up to $10,200 from their income.

Information for people who already filed their 2020 tax return

This law change occurred after some people filed their 2020 taxes. For taxpayers who already have filed and figured their 2020 tax based on the full amount of unemployment compensation, the IRS will determine the correct taxable amount of unemployment compensation. Any resulting overpayment of tax will be either refunded or applied to other taxes owed.

The agency will do these recalculations in two phases.

Taxpayers only need to file an amended return if the recalculations make them newly eligible for additional federal tax credits or deductions not already included on their original tax return.

For example, the IRS can adjust returns for taxpayers who claimed the earned income tax credit and, because the exclusion changed their income level, may now be eligible for an increase in the EITC amount.

However, taxpayers would have to file an amended return if they did not originally claim the EITC or other credits but are now eligible to claim them following the change in the tax law. Taxpayers can use the EITC Assistant to see if they qualify for this credit based upon their new taxable income amount. If they now qualify, they should consider filing an amended return to claim this money.

These taxpayers may want to review their state tax returns as well.

Information for people who haven’t filed their 2020 tax return

Tax preparation software has been updated to reflect these changes. People who haven’t yet filed and choose to file electronically, simply need to respond to the related questions when preparing their tax returns. These taxpayers should read New Exclusion of up to $10,200 of Unemployment Compensation for information and examples. For those who choose to file a paper return, instructions and an updated worksheet about the exclusion are available on IRS.gov.

Published on April 8, 2021 on IRS.Gov.

Side Note: As of the publishing of this article, Ohio has yet to issue guidance on Unemployment Benefits refunds.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Bobbie Haines

–until next week.

IRS Announces Higher Estate and Gift Tax Limits for 2021 March 24, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Retirement, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Many of our clients have the best of intentions of completing their estate planning. Not that I am perfect. Many of us have been fine-tuning our estate plan for decades. Granted this process is never really done. It is a work in process. But if you have a plan in place only in your head, your family may be surprised by the estate tax owed. Some rather painless steps may be taken with the help of an estate planning attorney to avoid these unpleasant surprises.


– Mark Bradstreet               

How much money should go to the tax collector when you die?

The Internal Revenue Service announced today the official estate and gift tax limits for 2021: The estate and gift tax exemption is $11.7 million per individual, up from $11.58 million in 2020. That means an individual could leave $11.7 million to heirs and pay no federal estate or gift tax, while a married couple could shield $23.4 million. 

(Speculative portion who may be our next President was omitted since this was written shortly before Election Day)

The IRS announced the new inflation-adjusted numbers in Rev. Proc. 2020-45. Forbes contributor Kelly Phillips Erb has all the details on 2021 tax brackets, standard deduction amounts and more. We have all the details on the 2021 retirement account limits, including the higher $58,000 overall 401(k) limit, too.

If you’re rich and you’re worried about the estate and gift tax exemption amounts going down, the time to start a gifting plan is now. The IRS finalized rules last year saying that it wouldn’t claw back lifetime gifts if/when the exemption is lowered.

The annual gift exclusion amount for 2021 stays the same at $15,000, according to the IRS announcement. What that means is that you can give away $15,000 to as many individuals—your kids, grandkids, their spouses—as you’d like with no federal gift tax consequences. A husband and wife can each make $15,000 gifts, doubling the impact.

Separately, you can make unlimited direct payments for medical and tuition expenses.

When you’re doing advanced estate planning—making gifts in excess of $15,000 annual exclusion gifts—you’re using your lifetime gift/estate tax exemption. With the new 2021 numbers, a couple who has used up every dollar of their exemption before the increase has another $240,000 of exemption value to pass on tax-free. For folks who are worried that that’s a lot to give, there are newfangled spousal lifetime asset trusts (aka a SLATs). They’re also IRS-tested advanced estate-freeze strategies like grantor-retained annuity trusts (GRATs) and installment sales to grantor trusts, where you give away the upside of assets transferred to the trust tax-free. For planning tips, see Trusts In The Age Of Trump.

Keep in mind the $23.4 million number per couple isn’t automatic. An unlimited marital deduction allows you to leave all or part of your assets to your surviving spouse free of federal estate tax. But to use your late spouse’s unused exemption—a move called “portability”—you must elect it on the estate tax return of the first spouse to die, even when no tax is due. The problem is if you don’t know what portability is and how to elect it, you could be hit with a surprise federal estate tax bill.

And note, if you live in one of the 17 states or the District of Columbia that levy separate estate and/or inheritance taxes, there’s even more at stake, with death taxes sometimes starting at the first dollar of an estate.

Here’s a look at the federal estate tax/gift tax exemption over the years, according to the Tax Policy Center:

2021: $11.7 million/$11.7 million
2018: $11.18 million/$11.18 million
2011: $5 million/$5 million
2009: $3.5 million/$1 million
2008: $2 million/$1 million
2003: $1 million/$1 million

Credit Given to: Ashlea Ebeling – a Senior Contributor for Forbes published on 10/26/20.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

Energy Credit Incentives for Individuals February 24, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

The below information regarding home energy credits was taken directly from the IRS website. I was reluctant to pull the same information from a contractor’s website. Not always, but sometimes, they are a bit over-zealous in their interpretation of the tax law when it comes to business. Buyer beware!

Please remember that a tax credit typically reduces your income taxes dollar for dollar. A tax deduction reduces your taxable income. Your federal income tax is based upon your taxable income. So, all things being the same a federal credit is typically worth more than a federal tax deduction.

If you are considering some home energy improvements of some sort, please be sure to do your homework on whether they may qualify. Also, please pay particular attention to the expiration dates below for different types of home energy improvements. 

                                               -Mark Bradstreet

Q. Are there incentives for making your home energy efficient by installing alternative energy equipment?

A. Yes, the residential energy efficient property credit allows for a credit equal to the applicable percent of the cost of qualified property. Qualifying properties are solar electric property, solar water heaters, geothermal heat pumps, small wind turbines and fuel cell property. Only fuel cell property is subject to a limitation, which is $500 with respect to each half kilowatt of capacity of the qualified fuel cell property. Generally, this credit for alternative energy equipment terminates for property placed in service after December 31, 2021. The applicable percentages are:

  1. In the case of property placed in service after December 31, 2016, and before January 1, 2020, 30 percent.
  2. In the case of property placed in service after December 31, 2019, and before January 1, 2021, 26 percent.
  3. In the case of property placed in service after December 31, 2020, and before January 1, 2022, 22 percent.

Q. Is a roof eligible for the residential energy efficient property tax credit?

A. In general, traditional roofing materials and structural components do not qualify for the credit. However, some solar roofing tiles and solar roofing shingles serve as solar electric collectors while also performing the function of traditional roofing, serving both the functions of solar electric generation and structural support and such items may qualify for the credit. Components such as a roof’s decking or rafters that serve only a roofing or structural function do not qualify for the credit.

Q. Does any guidance issued for the energy credit under section 48 of the Internal Revenue Code apply to the residential energy efficient property tax credit under section 25D of the Internal Revenue Code?

A. IRS guidance issued with respect to the energy credit under section 48 in publication items such as Notice 2018-59, has no applicability to the residential energy efficient property credit under section 25D.

Q. What improvements qualify for the residential energy property credit for homeowners?

A. In 2018, 2019 and 2020, an individual may claim a credit for (1) 10 percent of the cost of qualified energy efficiency improvements and (2) the amount of the residential energy property expenditures paid or incurred by the taxpayer during the taxable year (subject to the overall credit limit of $500).

Qualified energy efficiency improvements include the following qualifying products:

Residential energy property expenditures include the following qualifying products:

Please note that qualifying property must meet the applicable standards in the law.

The residential energy property credit, which expired at the end of December 2014, was extended for two years through December 2016 by the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015. The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 extended the credit through December 2017. The nonbusiness energy property credit expired on December 31, 2017 but was retroactively extended for tax years 2018, 2019 and 2020 on December 20, 2019 as part of the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act.  The credit had previously been extended by legislation several times. See Notice 2013-70 PDF for more information on this credit as well as the credit for alternative energy equipment.

Q. Who qualifies to claim a residential energy property credit? Are there limitations?

A. You may be able to take these credits if you made energy saving improvements to your principal residence during the taxable year. In 2018, 2019 and 2020, the residential energy property credit is limited to an overall lifetime credit limit of $500 ($200 lifetime limit for windows). There are also other individual credit limitations:

The residential energy property credit is nonrefundable. A nonrefundable tax credit allows taxpayers to lower their tax liability to zero, but not below zero.

Published on the IRS Website – October 2020

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

Small Business Tax Deduction Checklist February 3, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Deductions, Depreciation options, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

We receive a ton of questions regarding what is tax deductible. If the expense is associated with your business then it is most likely deductible. As a side note, many people are unaware that upon starting a new business, your personal assets that are now used in the new business may be deducted as an expense or as depreciation expense. Those personal assets have now been converted to from personal use to business use. They may be deducted at their fair market value at the time they were placed into service. Fair market value is typically defined as “garage sale” value. These assets may include computers, faxes, phones, copiers, printers, desks, chairs, tables, etc. The article that follows drills down further with a list of some common business tax deductions.

The not-so-good news? Every business needs to file taxes. The great news? There are many expenses you can apply to your income to help alleviate your tax burden. These deductions will reduce your profits, meaning that you will pay lower overall taxes. While the IRS does not specifically list what you can claim, they do state that if a cost you’ve incurred is “ordinary and necessary” to running your business, then you can deduct it.

We’ve created a checklist below of most of the deductions you can claim for your small business. As always, check with your accountant or tax preparer if you have any questions or need clarification. Note that some of the expenses listed below will need to be “depreciated” or expensed over several years. Speak to your tax preparer for more information.

Rent, Mortgage, and Utility Tax Deductions

These tax deductions include costs associated with renting a building for business, using part of your home as an office, utility bills, and other factors. 

Rent and Mortgage Expenses

Utility Bills Expenses

You cannot claim a telephone landline unless it is specifically dedicated to your business. You can claim a percentage of your mobile phone bill depending on how much you use your mobile phone for business.

Office Expenses and Tax Deductions

You can take additional deductions on money you spend for your business office.

Office Furniture Expenses

Office Computer Expenses

Office Software Expenses

Office Equipment Expenses

Office Supplies and Sundries Expenses

Office Maintenance and Repairs Expenses

Employee Expenses and Tax Deductions

If you pay a salary to employees, then you can deduct some of those costs from your business revenue. Employee expenses and taxes can be complex, so we recommend speaking to an accountant or tax preparer to understand what you can deduct.

Freelance, Contractor, and Professional Tax Deductions

You can claim costs for professional services like tax preparation or legal fees, and for paying freelancers or other contractors to complete work for your business.

Accountancy Expenses

Legal Expenses

Freelance and Contractor Expenses

Car and Vehicle Tax Deductions

If you use a vehicle in part or exclusively for your business, you can deduct those costs. You can either track everything individually, or use the IRS mileage rates.

Advertising and Marketing Tax Deductions

You can deduct any money you spend on promoting your business.

Travel and Accommodation Tax Deductions

If you travel or stay away from home for business, those costs are deductible.

Loan Interest and Bad Debt Tax Deductions

If you have taken out loans for your business, you can deduct the interest.

Education and Training Tax Deductions

When you provide training to yourself or your staff, those costs can be deducted.

Payment and Bank Fee Tax Deductions

Your bank is likely to charge you for business services, and you’ll also pay a fee for accepting charge, credit, or debit cards.

Insurance Tax Deductions

You can deduct insurance premiums incurred by your business:

Qualified Business Income Tax Deductions

Depending on the type of business you run, and subject to certain limits, you can claim up to 20% of your profits as a tax deduction. Speak to your accountant about this, as it can be a complex area.

Miscellaneous Tax Deductions

Depending on the type of business you run, there are potentially dozens of other areas you can expense. 

We hope you’ve found this small business tax deductions checklist useful. This list is not exhaustive, but it will give you a good starting point for your expenses. As always, talk to a professional tax preparer or accountant about your unique tax circumstances to ensure you’re claiming expenses correctly.

Credit given to Lisa Xiong and published on March 6, 2020.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

What You Need to File your Taxes January 20, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Deductions, Depreciation options, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Our job includes minimizing your income tax liability both in the short-term and long-term. Our ability to do so is closely tied to the accuracy and completeness of the information given us. Our client tax organizer and checklist are designed to help you report your income and deductions to us.  When your tax organizer and checklist are not completed, we may not know what we don’t know. Always, a good idea to call, mail, text or email any new events or questions during the year so we may either give you immediate suggestions and/or be on the alert during your tax preparation.

The following article by the Taxslayer Blog Team is written from the 30,000 feet view. Our tax organizer and checklist are more comprehensive. But the article will give you a starting point for gathering your tax information. 
                                                                                                                                                                                                -Mark Bradstreet

Tax Prep Checklist: Everything You Need to File Your Taxes

If you’d rather do something – anything – other than filing your taxes, remember that the sooner you file, the sooner you’ll get your refund. To make the e-filing process quicker, gather your forms and documents before you begin. Below is a checklist of the basic forms and records you’ll need to make slaying your taxes a cinch. 

Personal Information 

Income and Investment Information 

Self-Employment and Business Records (where applicable) 

Medical Expense Receipts and Records 

Charitable Donations 

Other Homeownership Info 

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

A Checklist of Business Deductions January 6, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Deductions, Depreciation options, General, Section 168, Section 179, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes , add a comment

Sara Sugar has created a list of small business deductions as shown below.  It is a great list to scan through and see if you have been overlooking any tax deductions.  Always fine to call us with any questions or comments you may have.

                                 -Mark Bradstreet

THE ULTIMATE LIST OF SMALL BUSINESS TAX DEDUCTIONS

Every small business owner wants to save money — and small business tax deductions are one way to do exactly that.

This list of 37 deductions will take you from “Ugh, taxes” to “Taxes? I got this.”

1. Vehicle Expenses.
Keep records during the year to prove the use of your car, truck or van, for business, especially if you also use the vehicle for personal reasons. When it’s time to pay taxes, you can choose to deduct your actual expenses (including gasoline, maintenance, parking, and tolls), or you can take the more straightforward route of using the IRS standard mileage rate — 58 cents per mile in 2019.

Whether you’re running errands in your own car or making deliveries in your bakery van, track the mileage and run some numbers to see which method gives you the higher deduction. If you drive a lot of miles each year, it makes more sense to use the standard mileage deduction when filing taxes. However, if you have an older vehicle that regularly needs maintenance, or isn’t fuel efficient, you might be able to get a larger deduction by using your actual expenses vs. the IRS mileage rate.

Either way, we all know that gas, repairs, parking, and mileage add up, so taking advantage of the standard mileage rate, or deducting your actual expenses, is a no-brainer way to put some of that money back in your pocket. Just make sure you keep records diligently to avoid mixing personal expenses with business ones.

2. Home Office.
Do you run part of your small business out of your home, maybe doing the books in the evenings after you’ve parked your food truck for the night? Or perhaps you run an entirely home-based business. For many self-employed individuals and sole proprietors, it’s pretty standard to have a space at home that’s devoted to your work. The key here is the word devoted. Sometimes doing work on at the kitchen table while your kids do their homework doesn’t count as a home office. You must have a specific room that’s dedicated to being your office in order for it to be tax deductible.

Calculating the size of your deduction is primarily related to the amount of your home that’s used as an office. For example:

Total square footage of your home / divided into square footage used as an office = the percentage of direct and indirect expenses (rent, utilities, insurance, repairs, etc.) that can be deducted.

We highly recommend that you read the IRS’ literature on this particular tax deduction, and/or speak with a tax professional before filing taxes with this deduction. It’s one of the more complicated ones available to small business owners, and there have been numerous court cases and controversies over the years. When dealing with the potential for a costly audit, it pays to be safe by consulting a professional tax preparer rather than sorry.

3. Bonus Depreciation.
If you buy new capital equipment, such as a new oven for your pizzeria, you get a depreciation tax break that lets you deduct 100 percent of your costs upon purchase. Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, 100% bonus depreciation only pertains to equipment purchased and placed in use between September 27, 2017 and January 1, 2023 — something to keep in mind as you plan for new equipment purchases in the next few years.

It’s important to note that according to the IRS, the asset you purchase must meet the following three requirements:

A few things that don’t count as assets include:

4. Professional Services.
As a small business, you don’t have in-house accountants or attorneys, but that doesn’t mean you can’t deduct their services. If you hire a consultant to help you grow your gift shop’s outreach, the fees and overall expense you pay for those services are deductible. Make sure the fees you’re paying are reasonable and necessary for the deduction to count by checking with the appropriate IRS publication or a tax professional. But you’d do that anyway, wouldn’t you?

5. Salaries and Wages.
If you’re a sole proprietor or your company is an LLC, you may not be able to deduct draws and income that you take from your business. However, salaries and wages that you pay to those faithful part-time and full-time employees behind the cash register are indeed deductible.

However, this doesn’t just stop at standard salaries and wages. Other payments like bonuses, meals, lodging, per diem, allowances, and some employer-paid taxes are also deductible. You can even deduct the cost of payroll software and systems in many cases.

6. Work Opportunity Tax Credit.
Have you hired military veterans or other long-term unemployed people to work behind your counter? If so, you may be eligible to take advantage of the Work Opportunity Tax Credit of 40 percent of your first $6,000 in wages.

7. Office Supplies and Expenses.
If you’re running a frozen yogurt shop, when you hear the word “supplies,” you probably think of plastic spoons. However, even if your business doesn’t have a traditional office, you can still deduct conventional business supplies and office expenses, as long as they are used within the year they’re purchased, so set up a file for your receipts. Many times, you can also deduct the cost of postage, shipping, and delivery services so if mail-order is a part of your business, be sure to keep track of this cost.

8. Client and Employee Entertainment.
Yes, you can take small business deductions for schmoozing your clients, as long as you do indeed discuss business with them, and as long as the entertainment occurs in a business setting and for business purposes. In some cases, you can’t deduct the full amount of your entertainment expenses, but every bit helps.

Here are some tips to guide when and what you can deduct:

(Please note:  the TCJA affected Meals & Entertainment deductions beginning in 2018.)

9. Freelance/Independent Contractor Labor.
If you bring in independent contractors to keep your checkout lines moving during the holidays or to create new marketing materials for your shop, you can deduct your costs. Make sure you issue Form 1099-NEC to anyone who earned $600 or more from you during the tax year.

10. Furniture and Equipment.
Did you buy new chairs for your eat-in bakery or new juicing blenders for your juice bar this year? You have a choice regarding how you take your small business tax deduction for furniture and equipment. You can either deduct the entire cost for the tax year in which it was purchased, or you can depreciate the purchases over a seven-year period. The IRS has specific regulations that govern your choices here, so make sure you’re following the rules and make the right choice between depreciation and full deduction.

11. Employee Benefits.
The benefits that businesses like yours offer to employees do more than attract high-quality talent to your team. They also have tax benefits. Keep track of all contributions you make to your employees’ health plans, life insurance, pensions, profit-sharing, education reimbursement programs, and more. They’re all tax-deductible.

12. Computer Software.
You can now deduct the full cost of business software as a small business tax deduction, rather than depreciating it as in years past. This includes your POS software and all software you use to run your business.

13. Rent on Your Business Location.
You undoubtedly pay rent for your pet store or candy shop. Make sure you deduct it.

14. Startup Expenses.
If you’ve just opened your gift shop or convenience store, you may be able to deduct up to $5,000 in start-up costs and expenses that you incurred before you opened your doors for business. These can include marketing and advertising costs, travel, and employee pay for training.

15. Utilities.
Don’t miss the small business tax deductions for your electricity, mobile phone, and other utilities. If you use the home office deduction, your landline must be dedicated to your business to be deductible.

16. Travel Expenses.
Most industries offer some form of trade show or professional event where similar businesses can gather to discuss trends, meet with vendors, sell goods and discuss industry news. If you’re traveling to a trade show, you can take a small business deduction for all your expenses, including airfare, hotels, meals on the road, automobile expenses – whether you use the IRS standard mileage rate or actual expenses – and even tipping your cab driver.

There are also deductions for expenses that might not immediately come to mind, like:

In order for your trip to qualify for a travel deduction, it must meet the following criteria:

As with all deductions, it’s imperative that you keep receipts and records of all business travel expenses you plan to deduct in case of an audit.

17. Taxes.
Deducting taxes is a little tricky because the small business deduction depends on the type of tax. Deduct all licenses and fees, as well as taxes on any real estate your business owns. You should also deduct all sales taxes that you have collected from the customers at your deli. You can also deduct your share of the FICA, FUTA, and state unemployment taxes that you pay on behalf of your employees.

18. Commissions.
If you have salespeople working on commission, those payments are tax-deductible. You can also take a small business tax deduction for third-party commissions, such as those you might pay in an affiliate marketing set-up.

19. Machinery and Equipment Rental.
Sometimes renting equipment for your coffee shop or concession stand is beneficial to your bottom line, since you can deduct these business expenses in the year they occur with no depreciation.

20. Interest on Loans.
If you take out a business line of credit, the interest you pay is completely deductible as a small business tax deduction. If you take out a personal loan and funnel some of the proceeds into your business, however, the tax application becomes somewhat more complicated.

21. Inventory for Service-Based Businesses.
Inventory normally isn’t deductible. However, if you’re a service-based business and you use the cash method of accounting (instead of the standard accrual method typically used for businesses with inventory), you can treat some inventory as supplies and deduct them. For instance, if you’re an ice cream shop but you sell your special hot fudge sauce as a product, your inventory may be deductible. Consult a tax professional to see if you qualify.

22. Bad Debts.
Did you advance money to an employee or vendor, and then not receive repayment or the goods or services you thought you were contracting for? If so, you may be able to treat this bad business debt as a small business deduction.

23. Employee Education and Child Care Assistance.
If you go above and beyond with your employee benefits, you may be able to take small business tax deductions for education assistance and dependent care assistance. The IRS is pretty much rewarding you here for being a great employer. So, take a bow, and the deduction.

24. Mortgage Interest.
If your business owns its own building, even if it’s just a hot dog stand, you can deduct all your mortgage interest.

25. Bank Charges.
Don’t forget to deduct the fees your bank charges you for your business accounts. Even any ATM fees are deductible.

26. Disaster and Theft Losses.
If your business is unfortunate enough to suffer theft or to be the victim of a natural disaster during the year, you may be able to turn any losses that your insurance company didn’t reimburse into a small business tax deduction.

27. Carryovers From Previous Years.
Some small business tax deductions carry over from year to year. For instance, if you had a capital loss in a previous year, you may be able to take it in the current year. Specifics often change from year to year, so make sure you’re up to date on the latest IRS regulations.

28. Insurance.
The insurance premiums you pay for coverage on your business is all tax-deductible. To qualify, your insurance must provide coverage that is “ordinary and necessary.”

This could include coverage for:

There are a few insurance types that you can’t deduct, the most common being life insurance. If you’re not sure whether you can deduct a certain type of insurance, and that deduction is an important factor in your decision, please speak with a tax professional first and save yourself any unnecessary expenses.

29. Home Renovations and Insurance.
Did you take a deduction for a home office already? If so, business expenses related to any renovations to that part of your home are also deductible, and so is the percentage of your homeowner’s insurance that covers that part of your home. Remember, all small business deductions related to home offices only apply if you use part of your home exclusively for business.

30. Tools.
The IRS distinguishes between tools and equipment. While you may have to capitalize on equipment rather than deducting it in one year, you can deduct tools that aren’t expensive or that have a life of only a year or less. And for the IRS, “tools” doesn’t just refer to hammers or screwdrivers; your spatulas and cookie sheets are tools as well.

31. Unpaid Goods.
If your business produces goods rather than providing a service, you can deduct the cost of any goods that you haven’t been paid for yet.

32. Education.
Did you attend any seminars, workshops or classes in the past year that were designed to help you improve your job skills? Your work-related educational expenses may be deductible, especially if they’re required to keep up or renew a professional license. Remember, they have to be work-related. If you own a bar or cafe, you won’t be able to deduct skiing lessons.

33. Advertising and Marketing.
You already know that providing amazing goods and services isn’t enough to make your business succeed. You also need to advertise so your potential customers can find you. Advertising and marketing dollars can add up fast, but fortunately, they are all tax-deductible.

This is great news since advertising and marketing are often of the biggest business expenses that small businesses need to deal with as they get off the ground. Rest assured, you can deduct everything from flyers to billboards to business cards, and even a new website. Political advertising is the biggest exception to this rule. Those expenses are not deductible.

34. Charitable Deductions.
Yes, your small business can donate to charity and take a deduction for it. It can donate supplies, money, or property to a recognized charity, but pay attention to the rules before you go crazy giving stuff away. Donations of your time don’t count, and you can’t wipe out your business income with donations. Also, check with the IRS before you make a charitable deduction to make sure the organization you want to support qualifies for the deduction.

35. Cleaning and Janitorial Expenses.
You know all too well that the workday isn’t over when you flip the sign on the door to say “Closed.” If you hire any type of cleaning service, make sure you take your small business tax deduction.

36. Moving Expenses.
Did you need to move to start your business? If you’re a sole proprietor or self-employed worker and you had to move more than 50 miles for business, you may be able to deduct some of your moving expenses from your taxes. Specifically, you may be able to deduct packing and transportation costs, utility and service connection fees, and travel costs. However, you can’t deduct the cost of any meals or security deposits you’ve had to pay.

Lastly, to qualify for these deductions, you will need to remain a full-time employee of the business that required you to move for at least 78 weeks out of the following two years.

37. Intangibles like Licenses, Trademarks, and other Intellectual Property.
Most of the time, expenses related to the registering or protection of intellectual property are deductible. However, the process you go about it can differ depending on what you’re trying to deduct. Some costs must be depreciated over multiple years, while others can be fully deducted within the year in which they were incurred. For example, licensing fees are typically considered capital expenses that must be depreciated. However, trademarks can often be deducted in the same tax year. If you’re uncertain, we recommend working with a tax professional to ensure you’re in compliance with the regulations governing your specific situation.

No matter what type of small business entity you have, you have to pay quarterly estimated taxes if the business owes income taxes of $1,000 or more. Corporations only have to pay quarterly estimated taxes if they expect to owe $500 or more in tax for the year.

Before you owned a business, filing taxes was a one-time thing. But as a small business owner, you’ll have to pay the IRS four times per year. On one hand, that’s four more tax deadlines you might miss. But on the bright side, by the time your yearly tax deadline comes around, you’ll have already paid three-quarters of your tax return.

To make things even more complicated, businesses must deposit federal income tax withheld from employees, federal unemployment taxes, and both the employer and employee social security and Medicare taxes. Depositing can be on a semi-weekly or monthly schedule.

Whether you’re filing your taxes quarterly or holding off for the next annual deadline, you should begin preparing for your taxes by keeping records of your expenses as of January of each year. Make sure to document each of these small business tax deductions by keeping physical receipts and writing down the business reason for the expense on your receipts as soon as you receive it.

With this comprehensive list of small business tax deductions, you’ll be well on your way to saving on your taxes this year. However, deductions can be tricky, it’s always best to consult a tax expert for any questions that might arise to ensure you are complying with all regulation and avoid any penalties.

Credit given to Sara Sugar. Published in MONEY & PROFITS on Jan 21, 2020.  

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

Amended Tax Returns November 25, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Deductions, Depreciation options, General, tax changes, Tax Deadlines, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip , add a comment

Filing an amended tax return is far from uncommon. In 2018, 3,500,000 were filed with the IRS. Amended tax returns are often needed for a large number of wide-ranging reasons. Some of the more common ones include receiving a late Form 1099 or a late Schedule K-1 or any other relevant information after your tax return was filed. Or, the cause for amending may be as simple as a math error which was not discovered until a later date. Keep in mind, that filing an amended return with the IRS often prompts filing amended returns for other tax entities such as your state, city and school district. For the most part today, these tax entities are linked. So, if an amended return is filed with the IRS – the other tax entities are notified of that change. So, they are now expecting an amended return as well. Not filing it with them usually prompts some nasty correspondence. Refunds created from filing amended returns are often a pleasant surprise; not so much fun if they cause a tax balance due. Many tax entities limit the time for which a refund claim may be filed. The IRS says the amended return for a refund must generally be filed within three years after the date the original return was filed or within two years after the date the tax was paid whichever is later. 

An article, If You Want to File an Amended Tax Return, authored by Tom Herman as published in the WSJ on September 14, 2020 follows.


                                     -Mark Bradstreet


Much to their chagrin, millions of taxpayers each year discover significant errors, omissions and other miscues on returns they already have filed.

Mastering all the details of knowing how to handle problems such as these can be surprisingly tricky. But the Internal Revenue Service recently took an important step toward making the process of filing an amended federal income-tax return easier.

Until recently, taxpayers who wanted to amend their federal income-tax return had to file Form 1040-X the old-fashioned paper way—even if they had filed their original return electronically. Then, in August, the IRS reversed course and said taxpayers generally can file amended returns electronically for last year with tax-preparation software.

“This is a significant and a very welcome development,” says Stephen W. DeFilippis, owner of DeFilippis Financial Group, a wealth-management and tax firm in Wheaton, Ill., and an enrolled agent (a tax specialist authorized to represent taxpayers at all levels of the IRS). This will make the amending process “easier for everyone: taxpayers, practitioners and the IRS,” he says.

“E-filed returns are generally processed faster, more efficiently and contain fewer errors than paper-filed returns,” says Alison Flores, principal tax research analyst at the Tax Institute at H&R Block Inc. “Similar results are likely to extend to Form 1040-X.” She says H&R Block has already begun e-filing amended returns for customers.

The IRS received nearly 3.5 million amended income-tax returns in 2018.

The e-filing option is also a timely change. Because of the coronavirus pandemic and other issues, IRS workers have been struggling to open and process unusually large mountains of mail. But it remains to be seen how much this new e-filing option will affect how long it takes for the IRS to respond to amended returns. The waiting time can vary significantly based on the facts, circumstances and complexity of each taxpayer’s situation.

As with so many tax issues, there are important exceptions and other fine print to consider for amended returns, filed electronically or on paper. If you’re planning to make amends, here are a few points to consider:

Limited scope
At this stage, the e-filing option for amended returns applies only for Forms 1040 and 1040-SR for the 2019 tax year. “Additional improvements are planned for the future,” the IRS said. Also, only taxpayers who e-filed their original Form 1040 or 1040-SR for 2019 can e-file an amended return, notes Ms. Flores of H&R Block.

Taxpayers who want to amend returns for more than one tax year must file for each year separately, says Eric Smith, an IRS spokesman. “So, for example, if you are amending multiple years and one of them is 2019, we urge you to e-file for 2019 and then send separate 1040-X forms” in separate envelopes for each of the other years, he says. “However, you decide to send it, it’s a good idea to keep any receipt or other evidence you do have that it was sent, whether it’s through one of the mailing or shipping options offered by the U.S. Postal Service or one of the authorized private delivery services,” he adds. “Also, be sure to keep a copy of your return.”

For refunds claimed in amended returns filed electronically, as with the paper 1040-X form, “we don’t currently offer direct deposit, but that’s one of the further enhancements we hope to make in the future,” Mr. Smith says.

Time limits
Generally, to claim a refund, you must file Form 1040-X “within three years after the date you filed your original return or within two years after the date you paid the tax, whichever is later,” regardless of how you file, the IRS says. “Returns filed before the due date (without regard to extensions) are considered filed on the due date, and withholding is deemed to be tax paid on the due date.”

But there are special rules for “refund claims relating to net operating losses, foreign tax credits, bad debts, and other issues.” For example, the IRS says a Form 1040-X based on a “bad debt or worthless security” generally must be filed “within seven years after the due date of the return for the tax year in which the debt or security became worthless.”

Common flubs
Among the classic reasons for amending: You forgot to include taxable income. You didn’t realize you were eligible for various credits, deductions or other valuable breaks. You claimed breaks you now realize you weren’t entitled to take. You need to correct your tax-filing status, or perhaps you received new information from a partnership or a financial institution that differs significantly from what you originally were told.

Another possible reason is that you were affected by a natural disaster in a place later designated as a federally declared disaster area. In such cases, victims have the option of claiming unreimbursed casualty losses for the year in which the disaster occurred—or on the previous year’s return (which typically would mean amending the return for that year).

For example, those who suffered losses from Hurricane Laura or California wildfires this year could deduct those losses on their returns for 2020 or 2019, whichever works out better. The Federal Emergency Management Agency provides a list of disaster declarations.

Some people also may benefit from several tax laws enacted near the end of 2019 that could affect their returns for prior tax years.

Other considerations
Some errors don’t require an amended return. The IRS says it may correct math or clerical errors on a return and even accept returns filed “without certain required forms or schedules.”

There are other circumstances when you shouldn’t file Form 1040-X. For example, the IRS says you shouldn’t amend to ask for “a refund of penalties and interest that you have already paid.” Instead, file Form 843.

In certain other cases, such as where criminal issues might be involved, consider consulting a skilled tax pro.

Lastly, if you amend your federal return, check to see whether you also may need to amend state tax returns and how to do so.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.