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Premium Tax Credit Repayments Suspended April 28, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Healthcare, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes , add a comment

The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 suspends the requirement that taxpayers increase their tax liability by all or a portion of their excess advance payments of the Premium Tax Credit (excess APTC) for tax year 2020. A taxpayer’s excess APTC is the amount by which the taxpayer’s advance payments of the Premium Tax Credit (APTC) exceed his or her Premium Tax Credit (PTC).

The Internal Revenue Service announced today that taxpayers with excess APTC for 2020 are not required to file Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit, or report an excess advance Premium Tax Credit repayment on their 2020 Form 1040 or Form 1040-SR, Schedule 2, Line 2, when they file.

Eligible taxpayers may claim a PTC for health insurance coverage in a qualified health plan purchased through a Health Insurance Marketplace. Taxpayers use Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit to figure the amount of their PTC and reconcile it with their APTC. This computation lets taxpayers know whether they must increase their tax liability by all or a portion of their excess APTC, called an excess advance Premium Tax Credit repayment, or may claim a net PTC.

Taxpayers can check with their tax professional or use tax software to figure the amount of allowable PTC and reconcile it with APTC received using the information from Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement.

The process remains unchanged for taxpayers claiming a net PTC for 2020. They must file Form 8962 when they file their 2020 tax return. See the Instructions for Form 8962 for more information. Taxpayers claiming a net PTC should respond to an IRS notice asking for more information to finish processing their tax return.

Taxpayers who have already filed their 2020 tax return and who have excess APTC for 2020 do not need to file an amended tax return or contact the IRS. The IRS will reduce the excess APTC repayment amount to zero with no further action needed by the taxpayer. The IRS will reimburse people who have already repaid any excess advance Premium Tax Credit on their 2020 tax return. Taxpayers who received a letter about a missing Form 8962 should disregard the letter if they have excess APTC for 2020. The IRS will process tax returns without Form 8962 for tax year 2020 by reducing the excess advance premium tax credit repayment amount to zero.

Again, IRS is taking steps to reimburse people who filed Form 8962, reported, and paid an excess advance Premium Tax Credit repayment amount with their 2020 tax return before the recent legislative changes were made. Taxpayers in this situation should not file an amended return solely to get a refund of this amount. The IRS will provide more details on IRS.gov. There is no need to file an amended tax return or contact the IRS.

As a reminder, this change applies only to reconciling tax year 2020 APTC. Taxpayers who received the benefit of APTC prior to 2020 must file Form 8962 to reconcile their APTC and PTC for the pre-2020 year when they file their federal income tax return even if they otherwise are not required to file a tax return for that year. The IRS continues to process prior year tax returns and correspond for missing information. If the IRS sends a letter about a 2019 Form 8962, they need more information from the taxpayer to finish processing their tax return. Taxpayers should respond to the letter so that the IRS can finish processing the tax return and, if applicable, issue any refund the taxpayer may be due.

See the  Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit and Fact Sheet 2021-08, More details about changes for taxpayers who received advance payments of the 2020 Premium Tax Credit.

Published on the IRS website April 9, 2021.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Bobbie Haines

–until next week.

The New Child Tax Credit April 21, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

When President Joe Biden signed the $1.9 trillion-dollar American Rescue Plan last month, he launched a new and improved Child Tax Credit. The Child Tax Credit has been around since the Clinton Administration, yet this new version may have a positive effect on Americans who have been trying to find financial stability through the Covid-19 pandemic.

As with all new legislation, there are a lot of moving parts. From determining income requirements to who is a qualifying child, it is a dizzying array of details to determine which taxpayers will be allowed to take the credit. 

Here is what we know so far:

The Credit Is a Monthly Payment In 2021

The new Child Tax Credit is currently for 2021 only.  For families that qualify, it will be a $3,600 credit for each child under age 6. For children ages 6 to 17, the credit is $3,000. The big difference from previous year is that half of the credit will pay out monthly from July through December.

In each of those months, the IRS will deposit the Child Tax Credit into taxpayers’ bank accounts – $300 for each child under age 6 and $250 for each child ages 6 to 17.

The remaining half of the credit will then be an adjustment – a “true up”- on the 2021 income tax return to be filed in April of 2022.

For dependents over 18, the credit will be $500.

It Is Income Based and There Is A Phase Out

Like the stimulus checks for the Covid-19 pandemic, the new Child Tax Credit will be based on adjusted gross income (In each of those months, the IRS will deposit the Child Tax Credit into taxpayers’ bank accounts – $300 for each child under age 6 and $250 for each child ages 6 to 17.

The remaining half of the credit will then be an adjustment – a “true up”- on the 2021 income tax return to be filed in April of 2022.GI). For single taxpayers, that is an AGI of $75,000 or less. For head of household, that is an AGI of $112,500 or less. Finally, for those filing married filing joint, it is an AGI of $150,000 or less.

But keep in mind that the credit is subject to a phase out. That means for every $1,000 a taxpayer earns over the AGI limit, their credit will be reduced by $50. For instance, if the taxpayer is a single filer with an AGI of $85,000, their credit will be reduced by $500 per child.

How to Qualify

The new Child Tax Credit is a 2021 tax credit, which means it will be based on your 2021 income. However, in order to quickly begin providing relief to taxpayers, the IRS will look at your 2020 income tax, as they did with the stimulus programs. If the taxpayer has not yet filed for 2020, they will look back to the 2019 return. One benefit for many taxpayers is that they still have until May 17, 2021 to file their tax return without an extension, which also gives them an additional opportunity to provide the IRS with direct deposit instructions.

As this is an AGI-based program, if a taxpayer’s 2020 income is within the AGI to qualify, but their 2021 income exceeds the limitations and phase out, the taxpayer will need to pay back the credit on their 2021 tax return.

The IRS Is Embracing Technology

While the new credit might be straightforward for some families, it won’t be for others. Situations where a new baby is born, a divorce occurs or a family might have too high an income in 2021 create challenges. While the IRS initially indicated that getting a portal set up in time for the July 1st launch was unlikely, in comments to the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday, April 13th, IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig stated that, “We will launch by July 1 with the absolute best product we are able to put together.”

As a result, for taxpayers that have unique situations, they should keep an eye out for the new IRS portal to open so they can enter key data in regards to the tax credit.

Unique Situations Where A Child Hits Age Threshold

As the program is based on AGI and age, there will be situations where a child changes age groups during 2021. As a result, taxpayers will need to consider the child’s age on December 31, 2021. For instance, if a taxpayer’s 5-year-old turns 6 before the end of the year, they will qualify for the $3,000 credit not the $3,600. Similarly, if a 17-year-old turns 18 before December 31, 2021, they will only receive a $500 credit instead of $3,000.

The Existing Child Tax Credit Is Still Available

There will be many taxpayers who will not qualify for the new Child Tax Credit. However, keep in mind, the Child Tax Credit that was established in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA), will still be available. This is a tax credit for single taxpayers with an AGI of $200,000 or less or taxpayers filing married with an AGI of $400,000 or less. This group of taxpayers will still qualify for a $2,000 tax credit for each child under age 17.

Keep in mind this group might also need to access the portal if their 2020 income would have them qualify for the higher credit.

More to Come

As we get closer to the July 1 rollout date, more details on the plan will be available, along with the IRS portal. In the meantime, taxpayers should focus on filing their 2020 income tax return as well as estimating their 2021 income to make sure that they qualify for this tax credit. It may be prudent to seek the help of a professional or use one of the new Child Tax Credit calculators that are available.

Credit Given to:  Megan Gorman. This article was published in Forbes on April 14, 2021.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Bobbie Haines

–until next week.

IRS to Issue Refunds for Unemployment Benefits April 14, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, tax changes, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Normally, any unemployment compensation someone receives is taxable. However, a recent law change allows some recipients to not pay tax on some 2020 unemployment compensation.

The IRS will automatically refund money to eligible people who filed their tax return reporting unemployment compensation before the recent changes made by the American Rescue Plan. These refunds are expected to begin in May and continue into the summer.

Under the new law, taxpayers who earned less than $150,000 in modified adjusted gross income can exclude some unemployment compensation from their income. This means they don’t have to pay tax on some of it. People who are married filing jointly can exclude up to $20,400 – up to $10,200 for each spouse who received unemployment compensation. All other eligible taxpayers can exclude up to $10,200 from their income.

Information for people who already filed their 2020 tax return

This law change occurred after some people filed their 2020 taxes. For taxpayers who already have filed and figured their 2020 tax based on the full amount of unemployment compensation, the IRS will determine the correct taxable amount of unemployment compensation. Any resulting overpayment of tax will be either refunded or applied to other taxes owed.

The agency will do these recalculations in two phases.

Taxpayers only need to file an amended return if the recalculations make them newly eligible for additional federal tax credits or deductions not already included on their original tax return.

For example, the IRS can adjust returns for taxpayers who claimed the earned income tax credit and, because the exclusion changed their income level, may now be eligible for an increase in the EITC amount.

However, taxpayers would have to file an amended return if they did not originally claim the EITC or other credits but are now eligible to claim them following the change in the tax law. Taxpayers can use the EITC Assistant to see if they qualify for this credit based upon their new taxable income amount. If they now qualify, they should consider filing an amended return to claim this money.

These taxpayers may want to review their state tax returns as well.

Information for people who haven’t filed their 2020 tax return

Tax preparation software has been updated to reflect these changes. People who haven’t yet filed and choose to file electronically, simply need to respond to the related questions when preparing their tax returns. These taxpayers should read New Exclusion of up to $10,200 of Unemployment Compensation for information and examples. For those who choose to file a paper return, instructions and an updated worksheet about the exclusion are available on IRS.gov.

Published on April 8, 2021 on IRS.Gov.

Side Note: As of the publishing of this article, Ohio has yet to issue guidance on Unemployment Benefits refunds.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Bobbie Haines

–until next week.

Will the Sale of Your Home be Taxable? April 7, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Depreciation options, General, Section 168, Section 179, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

We all expect that no tax will be due some day when we sell our homes. At least, that is what all of our friends and family tell us. And, there is a good chance that they will be correct at least under today’s rules which are always subject to change. The below article gives us the story from the 30,000 foot view. And, as long as you have lived in your home for at least two (2) years out of the last five (5) years and your gain is below $250,000 – single / $500,000 – married filing jointly; then, you may not even need to report the transaction on your return, much less pay any taxes. 

But when the transaction involves anything out of the ordinary such as a gain in excess of $250,000 / $500,000; the property was formerly a rental; was used as your business property; used as an office in the home; you or your spouse are in the military or an involuntary conversion occurs – just to mention a few, things can get complicated very quickly and a lot of tax money may be potentially due. So do your homework BEFORE you sell your home to help avoid any unpleasant surprises.

The article below was written by Mr. Geoff Williams. It takes a deeper dive into some tax consequences of selling your home. 

– Mark Bradstreet

The IRS is often more benevolent than you would think in these matters.

If you’re thinking about selling your home, here’s what you need to know about the taxes you may owe.

YOU MAY HAVE THOUGHT about the tax benefits of buying a home, but you probably haven’t thought much about the taxes you’ll pay when you sell your home. As you can imagine, the taxes on a home sale could theoretically be a small fortune, enough to almost scare you away from selling at all.

So, if you’re looking to be proactive and prepared, here are answers to some questions you may have.

Can I Avoid Paying Taxes on a Sale of a Home?

Yes. There is a very good chance that you won’t pay taxes on your home sale. In fact, if you’ve been worrying about this, it may be for nothing.

When you make money from the sale of your home, the IRS typically lets home sellers keep the first $250,000 they earn from the sale of the house. (That’s $250,000 if you’re single; if you’re married and filing jointly, you get to keep $500,000 of capital gains.)

So, What Happens if the Capital Gains Are Higher Than the $250,000 or $500,000 Thresholds?

In that case, you may be subject to capital gains taxes.

Here’s a hypothetical scenario to give you a sense of how much you might pay if you sell a home for well over $500,000 as a married couple filing jointly.

According to David Reyes, financial advisor and CEO of Reyes Financial Architecture in San Diego, if you bought a house 10 years ago for $350,000 and sell it now for $1 million (a relatively reasonable hypothetical in California), “you would owe taxes on any amount over the $500,000 – which would be $150,000.”

As in, you would owe taxes on that $150,000 (rather than having a $150,000 tax bill).

That said, you can probably get that $150,000 number to shrink a bit. “The IRS allows you to deduct certain closing costs such as title insurance and attorney fees. You can also deduct the commission that you pay your real estate agent. You may also deduct any home improvements that you made to the property. This figure becomes your cost basis,” Reyes says.

Those home improvements, incidentally, could add up to a lot. Did you replace the roof recently? Did you add a swimming pool to your backyard, or perhaps renovate the kitchen or add a room to the house? Hopefully you saved the receipts.

Reyes says that after all these deductions, you would pay taxes on the net proceeds.

“Let’s say that your total of all eligible deductions is $50,000. You would pay capital gains taxes on the (remaining) $100,000,” Reyes says. “Depending on your tax bracket, you could pay taxes of up to 20% federal income taxes, plus state taxes. This would be a tax of $20,000, plus state income tax.”

State Income Tax?

Yes, you may have to pay state income tax with the sale of your home – but you shouldn’t when the federal taxes are exempt. Still, check with your tax preparer just to be sure. “Every state is different,” Reyes says.

How Do I Report the Sale of My Home on My Income Taxes?

You may not have to. Says Reyes: “If you have a gain on your home that is under the exclusion, you do not have to report this on your tax return. If you do have a gain that is above the exclusion, you must report it on the Schedule D of your 1040.” For most people, yes, but there may be some complications to consider. We’ll run through some of the bigger ones.

The home is a rental. Is this a house that you don’t live in? Or maybe you did 10 years ago and then you rented it out, and now you’re selling the home? Even if you are making less than $250,000 or $500,000, you will be paying taxes on the sale. But keep in mind: If you lived in the house for a minimum of two years within the last five years, and you rented it out for the remainder of that period, you will avoid paying taxes if the profits are under the $250,000 or $500,000 thresholds.

The home is a vacation home or a second home. Again, you’ll be paying taxes on the house. It needs to be your primary residence.

Within the last two years, you sold a home – and claimed the $250,000 or $500,000 exclusion. So, you sold a house and didn’t have to pay the taxes on it? Awesome. But you did that 20 months ago? You will probably have to pay taxes.

Did You Say Probably?

You might be able to get an exclusion, or at least a partial one. This is one of those cases where it wouldn’t be a bad idea to talk to a tax preparer. In fact, whenever you are selling or buying, it’s generally a good idea to talk to a tax preparer to see how the home will affect your taxes. But if you sold a house 20 months ago and bought a new house with your spouse, and now you’re divorcing and selling the home to one or the other, you might be able to get an exclusion.

You may also be able to get an exclusion if your spouse died, and now you’re forced to sell the house.

If you lost your job and are now receiving unemployment benefits, you can probably get an exclusion.

But getting a partial or full exclusion doesn’t have to involve a tragic reason. For instance, if you and your spouse are having twins, triplets or even more kids, and you have suddenly outgrown the house, you may be able to get an exclusion. If that’s the case, you’ll want to talk to a tax preparer, and along with all of the parenting and baby books you’re buying, consult the IRS’s “Publication 523 (2019), Selling Your Home.”

Credit given to: Geoff Williams, Contributor for US News published May 20, 2020.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.