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Tax Tip of the Week | The Most Common Tax Forms for the New Year January 1, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Business Consulting, Deductions, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Uncategorized , add a comment

Happy New Year!

Now it’s time to get ready for the tax filing season.

Hopefully, you followed some of the suggestions outlined in Publication 552 to organize your records. If you did, great! This will make filing your tax returns a lot easier this year. It also means that you and your tax advisor can spend more time on tax and financial planning issues for 2020 vs. looking back to 2019. 

This week we will look at some of the more common forms that you should be watching for in the coming weeks and months:

W-2:    Employers should mail these by 1/31/20. If you have moved during the year, make sure former employers are aware of your new address. Some employers provide W-2’s to their employees via a website. Be sure to login and print out your W-2 after it is available.

W-2G:    Casinos, Lottery Commissions and other gambling entities should mail these by 1/31/20 if you have gambling winnings above a certain threshold. Note:  Some casinos will issue you a W-2G at the time you win a jackpot. Make sure you have saved those throughout the year.

1098-C:    You might receive this form if you made contributions of motor vehicles, boats, or airplanes to a qualified charitable organization. A donee organization must file a separate Form 1098-C with the IRS for each contribution of a qualified vehicle that has a claimed value of more than $500. All filers of this form may truncate a donor’s identification number (social security number, individual taxpayer identification number, adoption taxpayer identification number, or employer identification number), on written acknowledgements. Truncation is not allowed, however, on any documents the filer files with the IRS.

1099-MISC:   This form reports the total paid during the year to a single person or entity for services provided. Certain Medicaid waiver payments may be excludable from the income as difficulty of care payments.  A new check box was added to this form to identify a foreign financial institution filing this form to satisfy its Chapter 4 reporting requirement.

1099-INT:    This form is used to report interest income paid by banks and other financial institutions. Box 13 was added to report bond premium on tax-exempt bonds. All later boxes were renumbered. A new check box was added to this form to identify a foreign financial institution filing this form to satisfy its Chapter 4 reporting requirement.

1099-DIV:    This form is issued to those who have received dividends from stocks. A new check box was added to this form to identify a foreign financial institution filing this form to satisfy its Chapter 4 reporting requirement.

1099-B:     This form is issued by a broker or barter exchange that summarizes the proceeds of sales transactions. For a sale of a debt instrument that is a wash sale and has accrued market discount, a code “W” should be displayed in box 1f and the amount of the wash sale loss disallowed in box 1g.

1099-K:    This form is given to those merchants accepting payment card transactions. Completion of box 1b (Card Not Present transactions) is now mandatory.

K-1s:    If you are a partner, member or shareholder in a partnership or S corporation, your income and expenses will be reported to you on a K-1. The tax returns for these entities are not due until 3/16/20 (if they have a calendar-year accounting). Sometimes, you may not receive a K-1 until shortly after the entity’s tax return is filed in March.

If you are a beneficiary of an estate or trust, your share of the income and expenses for the year will also be reported on a K-1. These returns will be due 4/15/20 so you might not receive your K-1 before the due date of your Form 1040.

NOTE:  Many times corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts will put their tax returns on extension. If they do, the due date of the return is not until 9/15/20 or later. We often see clients receiving K-1s in the third week of September.

If you receive, or expect to receive, a K-1 it is best if you place your personal return on extension. It is a lot easier to extend your return than it is to amend your return after receiving a K-1 later in the year.

1098:    This form is sent by banks or other lenders to provide the amount of mortgage interest paid on mortgage loans. The form might also show real estate taxes paid and other useful information related to the loan.

1098-T:    This form is provided by educational institutions and shows the amounts paid or billed for tuition, scholarships received, and other educational information. These amounts are needed to calculate educational credits that may be taken on your returns.

So start watching your mailbox and put all of these statements you receive in that new file you created!

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

–until next week

Tax Tip of the Week | Happy Holidays & Happy New Year! December 25, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Tax Tip, Uncategorized , add a comment

Enjoy the Holidays!

We are going to take a break from our tax and business tips this week. Instead, the family of Bradstreet & Company would like to wish you and your family the most joyous holiday season and best wishes for 2020.

We hope you enjoy the Tax Tip of The Week. As always, your topic suggestions and questions are always appreciated.

Is the Tax Tip of the Week real?

While your kids are questioning if Santa is real, we continue to receive some interesting feedback that some of you don’t realize this is really Bradstreet & Company CPAs reaching out each week (… some suspect this is a “packaged” communication to which we add our logo.) Well, rest assured it’s us and we love to hear from you. 

Enjoy the week and, “Yes Virginia, there is a Santa Claus”.

Wishing you all great things,

The Staff at Bradstreet & Company

Tax Tip of the Week | The Tax Landmines of Lending to Family Members November 6, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

People often lend money to family members, but few think about the IRS when making the “loan”.  In the article that follows, Bob Carlson, Senior Contributor to Forbes, discusses the procedures and consequences one should consider before getting out the checkbook. If you are in this situation as a lender, or as a borrower, the following article does a great job of explaining the “rules” that you need to consider.

                                     –    Norman S. Hicks

Many people are happy to lend money to their loved ones, especially to children and grandchildren. But before stroking the check, review the tax rules. The tax consequences vary greatly depending on the terms of the loan. A small change in the terms can mean a big difference in taxes and penalty. 

Too often, family loans are informal arrangements. They don’t carry an interest rate or have a payment schedule. They essentially are demand notes. Payment isn’t due until the lending parent or grandparent demands it, and that’s not likely to happen unless the lender’s financial situation changes adversely. 

That runs afoul of the tax rules. In a family loan, when there is no interest rate or a rate below the IRS-determined minimum rate, the interest that isn’t charged is assumed to be income to the parent from the child. In other words, there is imputed interest income or phantom income. The parent is to report interest income at the IRS-determined minimum rate as gross income, though no cash is received. The borrower might be able to deduct the same amount if they qualify for the mortgage interest deduction. 

In addition, the lending parent or grandparent is assumed to make a gift of the imputed interest to the borrowing child or grandchild. In most cases, the annual gift tax exclusion is more than sufficient to prevent the gift from having any tax consequences. In 2019, a person can make gifts up to $15,000 per person with no gift tax consequences under the annual gift tax exclusion. A married couple can give up to $30,000 jointly.

To avoid these tax consequences, there should be a written loan agreement that states interest will be charged that is at least the minimum interest rate determined by the IRS for the month the agreement was signed. You can find the minimum rate for the month by searching the Internet for “applicable federal rate” for the month the loan agreement was made. The rate you use will depend on whether the loan is short-term, mid-term, or long-term and on whether interest compounds monthly, quarterly, semiannually, or annually.

The applicable federal rate is based on the U.S. Treasury’s borrowing rate for the month. That means it’s a low rate and is likely to be a lower rate than the child or grandchild could obtain from an independent lender. 

It’s a good idea for the borrower to make at least interest payments on a regular basis. Otherwise, the IRS could argue that there wasn’t a real loan and the entire transaction was a gift.

There are two important exceptions to the imputed interest rules.

A loan of $10,000 or less is exempt. Make a relatively small loan and the IRS doesn’t want to bother with it.

The second exception applies to loans of $100,000 or less. The imputed income rules apply, but the lending parent or grandparent can report imputed interest at the lower of the applicable federal rate or the borrower’s net investment income for the year. If the borrower doesn’t have much investment income, the exception can significantly reduce the amount of imputed income that’s reported.

Suppose Hi Profits, son of Max and Rosie Profits, wants to purchase a home and needs help with the down payment. Max and Rosie lend $100,000 to Hi. They charge 3.22% interest on the loan, which was the applicable federal rate in July 2019 for a long-term loan on which the interest is compounded semiannually. 

If Hi Profits doesn’t make interest payments, Max and Rosie will have imputed income of $3,220 each year that must be included in their gross income. In addition, they will be treated as making a gift to Hi of $3,220 each year. As long as they don’t make other gifts to Hi that put them over the annual gift tax exclusion amount ($30,000 on joint gifts by a married couple), there won’t be any gift tax consequences.

Hi can have the loan recorded as a second mortgage against the property. That might enable him to deduct the imputed interest on his income tax return, though he made no cash payments.

Max and Rosie have two costs to the loan. The first cost is the investment income they could have earned on the $100,000. 

The other cost is the income taxes they’ll owe on the imputed interest income. 

To avoid tax problems with a loan to a family member, be sure there’s a written loan agreement stating the amount of the loan, the interest rate, and the repayment terms. The interest rate should be at least the applicable federal rate for the month the loan is made. Simple loan agreement forms can be found on the Internet.

If the loan calls for regular payment of interest, or interest and principal, those payments should be made and should be documented. The more you make the transaction look like a real loan, the less likely it is the IRS will try to tax it as something else, such as a gift. 

A written loan agreement also can prevent any misunderstandings between the borrower and your estate or other family members after you’re gone. Your will should state whether you want the loan repaid to your estate, forgiven and deducted from the borrower’s inheritance or treated some other way.

Family loans are in wide use. Be sure you take the extra steps needed to avoid problems with the IRS.

Credit given to Bob Carlson, Senior Contributor to Forbes Media.  Bob is the editor of Retirement Watch, a monthly newsletter and web site he founded in 1990.  The above article can be found at: https://www.forbes.com/sites/bobcarlson/2019/10/16/the-tax-landmines-of-lending-to-family-members/#30802295468f.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. We may be reached in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.  

This Week’s Author – Norman S. Hicks, CPA

–until next week.

Tax Tip of The Week | Did You Know All Ohio Businesses Must File An Annual Report of Unclaimed Funds? October 23, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

It’s that time of year again…

Time to report unclaimed funds! This one really gets business owners excited (sarcasm intended).

As stated by the Ohio Department of Commerce, “All businesses that are located and/or operate in the State of Ohio, or hold funds due to Ohio residents, are required to file an Annual Report of Unclaimed Funds.”

Unclaimed Funds Reports are due by November 1st.

The Ohio Treasury wants Ohioans to recover money that is rightfully theirs. Every year 200,000 Ohioans lose track of their funds. They either put money in financial institutions and forget about it, or simply cannot track it in their records.

What is the Division of Unclaimed Funds?

The Ohio Department of Commerce, Division of Unclaimed Funds exists to protect money lost by Ohioans in various financial institutions, find the people the money belongs to, and then returns it as quickly as possible. More than $1 billion currently is in the custody of the Division of Unclaimed Funds. The Ohio Treasury makes Ohioans aware of the Division of Unclaimed Funds, so that they get back money rightfully theirs. You can perform a search using the following link:

SEARCH UNCLAIMED FUNDS

What types of accounts qualify as unclaimed funds?

We have a document from the Ohio Department of Commerce that helps explain what qualifies as “unclaimed funds,” as well as how to report them, here:

 HOW TO FILE AN UNCLAIMED FUNDS REPORT

Even if you have no unclaimed funds to report, a negative report must be filed.

What happens if your Ohio-based company does not report?

According to the Ohio Department of Commerce:

“For failing to report unclaimed funds or underreporting unclaimed funds, the company may incur civil penalties of $100.00 per day. The company may also have to pay interest at a rate up to 1% per month on the balance of unclaimed funds due per Ohio Revised Code section 169.12.”

What is NAUPA?

The National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators (NAUPA) is a non-profit organization that maintains a national database, called Missing Money, to help people find unclaimed property.

MISSING MONEY

For additional assistance, contact the Ohio Department of Commerce’s Division of Unclaimed Funds at 1-877-644-6823.

Still struggling in determining how to file an Unclaimed Funds Report?

At Bradstreet & Associates and Bradstreet & Company CPAs, we’re here to help. If you need assistance filing your report, please call our Xenia office at 937-372-3504 or our Centerville office at 937-436-3133.

A complete information booklet on Reporting Unclaimed Funds is available here:
http://www.com.ohio.gov/documents/unfd_AnnualReportOfUnclaimedFunds.pdf

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

This Week’s Co-Authors – Bobbie Haines & Linda Johannes, CPA

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | A Need to Know on Capital Gains Taxes September 4, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Depreciation options, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Generally, capital assets that are held in excess of one year and sold at a profit may be taxed at three (3) possible tax rates: (1) 0%, (2) 15% or (3) 20%. For most people, the rate used depends upon their filing status and the amount of their taxable income. Gains from the sale of capital assets not held for a year are taxed as ordinary income. If capital assets are sold at a loss – generally, only $3,000 ($1,500 married filing separate) may be deducted annually unless other capital gains are available as an offset.

Everyone thinks that Congress designed the zero-percent capital gain rate just for them. That thinking is only natural since so many reporters and so many politicians have over-hyped the catchy expression of “zero-percent rate.” The truth is VERY few taxpayers will ever be in position to take advantage of the zero-percent long-term capital gain rate. To do so, for most single and married couples filing jointly, their taxable income not including the capital gains must be less than $39,375 or $78,750, respectively. Remember your taxable income might include any Form W-2s, interest and dividend income, business and rental income etc. But, it also includes the capital gain itself. So, not a very big window exists for the possibility of qualifying for using the zero-percent rate. If your income other than capital gains, less your deductions exceeds these taxable income ceilings then the window not only shuts but disappears as though it never existed. This capital gain tax calculation is not made the same as the calculation of income taxes which are calculated using the incremental tax brackets. And, depending upon the amount of your regular taxable income not including the capital gains above and beyond the amounts of $39,375/$78,750 – you will then use either the 15% OR the 20% tax bracket for the capital gains rate. Don’t forget the “net investment income tax” of 3.8% which could be an additional tax along with your particular state income tax. Ohio taxes capital gains as ordinary income. Also, technically outside the tax world – various income levels may also affect the amount of your Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT), Medicare insurance premiums and the amount of student loan repayments (if applicable).

More information and explanations follow in the article below by Tom Herman as published by the Wall Street Journal on Monday, June 17, 2019.

                            -Norm Hicks and Mark Bradstreet

By tax-law standards, the rules on capital-gains taxes may appear fairly straightforward, especially for taxpayers who qualify for a zero-percent rate.

But many other taxpayers, especially upper-income investors, “often find the tax law around capital gains is far more complicated than they had expected,” says Jordan Barry, a law professor and co-director of graduate tax programs at the University of San Diego Law School.

Here is an update on the brackets for this year and answers to questions readers may have on how to avoid turning capital gains into capital pains.

Who qualifies for the zero-percent rate?

For 2019, the zero rate applies to most singles with taxable income of up to $39,375, or married couples filing jointly with taxable income of up to $78,750, says Eric Smith, an IRS spokesman. Then comes a 15% rate, which applies to most singles up to $434,550 and joint filers up to $488,850. Then comes a top rate of 20%.

But don’t overlook a 3.8% surtax on “net investment income” for joint filers with modified adjusted gross income of more than $250,000 and most singles above $200,000. That can affect people in both the 15% and 20% brackets. For those in the 20% bracket, that effectively raises their top rate to 23.8%. “That 23.8% rate is the rate we use to plan around for high net-worth individuals,” says Steve Wittenberg, director of legacy planning at SEI Private Wealth Management.

There are several other twists, says Mark Luscombe, principal analyst for Wolters Kluwer Tax & Accounting. Among them: a maximum of 28% on gains on art and collectibles. There are also special rates for certain depreciable real estate and investors with certain types of small-business stock. See IRS Publication 550 for details. There also are special rules when you sell your primary residence.

State and local taxes can be important, too, especially in high-tax areas such as New York City and California. This has become a much bigger issue in many places, thanks to the 2017 tax overhaul that included a limit on state and local tax deductions. As a result, many more filers are claiming the standard deduction and thus can’t deduct state and local taxes. But some states, including Florida, Texas, Nevada, Alaska and Washington, don’t have a state income tax. Check with your state revenue department to avoid nasty surprises.

How long do I typically have to hold stocks or bonds to qualify for favorable long-term capital-gains tax treatment?

More than one year, says Alison Flores, principal tax research analyst at The Tax Institute at H&R Block. Gains on securities held one year or less typically are considered short-term and taxed at the same rates as ordinary income, she says. The rules are “much more complex” for investors using options, futures and other sophisticated strategies, says Bob Gordon, president of Twenty-First Securities in New York City. IRS Publication 550 has details, but investors may need to consult a tax pro.

The holding-period rules can be important for philanthropists who itemize their deductions. Donating highly appreciated shares of stock and certain other investments held more than a year can be smart. Donors typically can deduct the market value and can avoid capital-gains taxes on the gain. But don’t donate stock that has declined in value since you purchased it. “Instead, sell it, create a capital loss you can use, and donate the proceeds” to charity, Mr. Gordon says. You can use capital losses to soak up capital gains. Investors whose losses exceed gains may deduct up to $3,000 of net losses ($1,500 for married taxpayers filing separately) from their wages and other ordinary income. Carry over additional losses into future years.

If you sell losers, pay attention to the “wash sale” rules, says Roger Young, senior financial planner at T. Rowe Price . A wash sale typically occurs when you sell stock or securities at a loss and buy the same investment, or something substantially identical, within 30 days before or after the sale. If so, you typically can’t deduct your loss for that year. (However, add the disallowed loss to the cost basis of the new stock.) Mr. Young also says some investors may benefit from “tax gain harvesting,” or selling securities for a long-term gain in a year when they don’t face capital-gains taxes.

While taxes are important, make sure investment decisions are based on solid investment factors, not just on taxes, says Yolanda Plaza-Charres, investment-solutions director at SEI Private Wealth Management. And don’t wait until December to start focusing on taxes.

“We believe in year-round tax management,” she says.

What if I sell my home for more than I paid for it?

Typically, joint filers can exclude from taxation as much as $500,000 of the gain ($250,000 for most singles). To qualify for the full exclusion, you typically must have owned your home—and lived in it as your primary residence—for at least two of the five years before the sale. But if you don’t pass those tests, you may qualify for a partial exclusion under certain circumstances, such as if you sold for health reasons, a job change or certain “unforeseen circumstances,” such as the death of your spouse. See IRS Publication 523 for details. When calculating your cost, don’t forget to include improvements, such as a new room or kitchen modernization.

Credit given to Tom Herman. This article appeared in the June 17, 2019, print edition as ‘A Need to Know on Capital-Gains Taxes.’ Mr. Herman is a writer in New York City. He was formerly The Wall Street Journal’s Tax Report columnist. Send comments and tax questions to taxquestions@wsj.com.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

This Week’s Author – Mark Bradstreet, CPA & Norman S. Hicks, CPA

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | Ohio Small Business Deduction – TAKE IT! August 28, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business Consulting, Deductions, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

We work with many attorneys for a myriad of reasons. Some specialize in business dealings such as mergers, acquisitions, etc. Mr. Jeff Senney, a prominent business attorney with Pickrel, Schaeffer and Ebeling, wrote the following article which discusses a deduction that owners, or equity investors, of an Ohio business who file an Ohio individual income tax return may be eligible to take each year. The deduction is commonly known as the Ohio Small Business Deduction (SBD) and began in its earliest form in 2013. The SBD allowed the taxpayer to deduct 50% of up to $250,000 of Ohio business income, for a maximum deduction of $125,000. In 2014, the deduction increased to 75% of $250,000 for a maximum deduction of $187,500. Adjustments were required also, such as add-backs for retirement contributions, the self-employment tax deduction, and the self-employed health insurance deduction that were reported on the taxpayer’s federal return for both 2013 and 2014. The deduction remained at 75% for 2015 and the requirement to add back the above-mentioned adjustments was eliminated. In its current form, the deduction is for 100% of $250,000. We hope you enjoy Jeff’s article as reproduced below.

      – Norman S. Hicks, CPA

For 2016 (and subsequent years), each individual small business owner filing single or married filing jointly is eligible for a “small business” income tax deduction (SBD) against their state income tax liability equal to 100% of the first $250,000 of business income the owner receives or is allocated from a sole proprietorship or pass-through entity (“PTE”). Married filing separate taxpayers will be able to deduct 100% of business income in 2016 but only up to $125,000. Any remaining business income above these threshold amounts is taxed at a flat 3% rate.

For tax years 2014 and 2015, the SBD percentage for all taxpayers was only 75%.

PTEs include partnerships, “S” corporations and limited liability companies (“LLCs”). Income generated by the business and passed through to the owners/investors is subject to personal income tax. The deduction was originally applicable only for Ohio-sourced business income. But beginning in tax year 2015, the deduction was expanded to include eligible business income from all sources.

Individuals who directly or indirectly through a tiered structure own at least a 20% interest in profits or capital of a PTE may also include their wages and guaranteed payments from that PTE in the calculation of the SBD. It was not originally clear whether the direct or indirect ownership included constructive ownership from family members. But the Ohio Department of Taxation has recently made clear that stock attribution among family members (such as husband to wife) does not count in determining whether the individual owns the requisite 20% interest.

Taxpayers who failed to claim the SBD on their originally income tax returns should give serious thought to filing amended returns to claim the SBD for all open years. While the SBD is referred to as the “small business deduction,” there is no limit on gross receipts or assets that the PTE can have.

The SBD can be taken not only by Ohio residents on all their business income received, but also by Ohio nonresidents and part-year residents.

While electing to be included in a composite tax return makes financial sense in most states, taxpayers could be missing out on the SBD tax savings available in Ohio. A PTE cannot deduct the SBD on a composite tax return filed on a taxpayer’s behalf, and the SBD cannot be claimed on any other non-individual tax return, such as a trust return and even a nonresident withholding return. Accordingly, if an individual taxpayer has been included in a composite return or has had withholding performed by a PTE, the taxpayer may be paying more Ohio tax than necessary.

Many taxpayers may not have taken the SBD because they mistakenly thought they were required to own 20% or more of a PTE in order to qualify for the SBD. But that is not the case. The 20% ownership requirement only applies to deduction of compensation and guaranteed payments. Taxpayers owning less than 20% are still eligible to claim the SBD on their share of other qualifying business income.

Many taxpayers also do not realize that the 20%-or-more requirement only needs to be met once during a tax year. If an individual owner meets the 20% ownership test at any point during the calendar year, the individual’s entire year of compensation or guaranteed payments may qualify as business income. While not entirely clear, it is likely the Ohio Department of Taxation would try to deny the SBD where a husband and wife transferred ownership back and forth during a year in order to make them both 20% owners on at least one day during the year.

Credit given to Jeff Senney. He can be reached at 937-223-1130 or Jsenney@pselaw.com or https://www.pselaw.com/attorneys/jeffrey-senney. Jeff’s article can be found at: https://www.pselaw.com/ohio-small-business-deduction-take-it/ 

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. We may be reached in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.  

This Week’s Author – Norman S. Hicks, CPA

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | How to Avoid being Overwhelmed in Times of Death and Illness? August 7, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Healthcare, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

What do you do when one spouse refuses to be or has not been invited to be involved with finances but then an unexpected death or illness occurs?

Dealing with death and illness is a difficult time for a spouse and the family, no matter the circumstances. When the spouse is unaware of how the finances have been handled, it may lead to frozen accounts and assets. Gary Altman, an estate planning attorney in Rockville, MD., explained that it is common to find families in this situation. He recently had a client who had to ask her brother-in-law for financial assistance. Altman stated that his client did not have enough money in their joint accounts. She was unable to make ends meet because the accounts were in her husband’s name alone and the financial institutions will freeze the single-owner accounts when a person dies. 

Financial professionals and attorneys know that these times are sensitive, delicate and trying. They also have encountered many times that the surviving spouse who was hands-off has to deal with missing information and does not have complete knowledge of their net worth or where accounts are held. The surviving spouse will most likely be overwhelmed with the financial decisions while trying to cope with the day to day emotions of grief and loss. Grieving can cause a person to have high emotions, which may lead to unclear decisions. According to Susan Bradley, founder of Sudden Money Institute, grief can reduce cognitive capacity. She recommends that the surviving spouse focus on what is important or pressing during this time. For example, the survivor should pay the bills that are essential to live each day. Slowing down and realizing what is truly important throughout this time will allow prioritizing urgent matters, most importantly, dealing with emotions and getting through the day one step at a time. The surviving spouse should wait until he or she is no longer in shock to make financial decisions and understand their financial needs. 

Here are steps couples should take to prevent frozen accounts when faced with death or illness:

1.    Hire a financial planner who specializes in estate settlement and an accountant to file tax returns for state and/or federal estate tax returns. Establishing a financial advisor, that both spouses like and trust, can reduce these overwhelming decisions that one might need to make without an advisor. Each spouse should be confident and comfortable with this person.

2.    Make sure both spouses give the executor permission to manage digital assets. Enabling both spouses to have access to and control over assets will reduce potential problems in the situation of death or illness. Another way to ensure immediate access is by stating “transferable on death.” This may be done when the couple sets up the account. 

3.    Stay up to date with your online service software to track every account and asset. This will ensure secure accounts and assets. Assets that are jointly held or are held in the survivor’s name alone are protected, unless the survivor co-signed or guaranteed the debts.

Here are steps a surviving spouse should take when dealing with death or illness:

1.    Order multiple copies of the death certificate to use to reassign financial accounts and settle the estate. The death certificate will allow you to contact the spouse’s employer to ask about a 401(k), pension, stock options and life insurance, etc.  

2.    Contact the estate attorney, accountant and financial adviser. Update your will after shock has worn off. 

3.    Gather and rename household bills, bank, brokerage, insurance, and credit-card statements in your name alone. 

4.    Create a new financial plan after you have understood immediate expenses and are able to make long-term decisions. 

Credit given to:  Tergesen, A. (2019, March 29). Estate Planning for the Uninitiated. 

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

This Week’s Author – Brianna Anello

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | Growing up to be Entrepreneurs July 31, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

While the majority of us will spend most of our careers working for someone else, having an entrepreneurial spirit or background can open up new possibilities and ways to approach everyday life. The following article was published in the Wall Street Journal on April 28, 2019 by Molly Baker.

                              -Brianna Anello

From the very beginning, Bob Burch has exposed his children to entrepreneurship. When his first daughter, Neely, was born, Bob Burch’s first instinct was to introduce Neely to the office. So, he brought her by to show her off on their way back from the hospital. This poses the famous question on whether entrepreneurs are born or made? Throughout the Burch family this can be seen in both aspects. Entrepreneurships started with Mr. Burch and his brother Chris. They are the founders of a successful retail clothing line, Tony Burch. 

Mr. Burch believes a crucial part of becoming an entrepreneur is nurturing a sense of entrepreneurship. Immersion started at an early age for the Burch children, from encouraging local lemonade sales to teaching them what you need to start a business, to going across the country to show his family potential business ventures. They believe that entrepreneurs should be independent, creative and persistent when wanting to start their own business. These experiences have taught the Burch family lessons that they will hold close to their heart for the rest of their lives. 

Today the three oldest children are travelling the same path as their father, in becoming successful entrepreneurs. Roby, Bob’s son, will never forget his dad’s words of wisdom, “I can’t teach you how to be a lawyer, and I can’t teach you how to be a doctor. I can teach you how to be in business for yourself and how to be good at it.” The Burch children believe their parents, Bob and Susan, never really had certain hopes and dreams for their careers. Bob and Susan wanted their children to think beyond what college they wanted to attend or what they wanted to be when they grew up. They encouraged their children to think big. The process to thinking big included engaging and debating at the dinner table over work ideas. Bob explains that there is no such thing as solo effort. This process is a team effort and will enable the children to release their creativity. At the table, the children also absorbed business lingo and the strategies that they may use one day.

Entrepreneurship is about having the “ready for anything” mindset. One example Bob recalls is the most memorable turnaround story. When he was launching his first fashion show, the first truckload of products arrived and the sweaters had sleeves three inches too short. At this time, he didn’t have the time or money to replace them. Bob and his brother were on their toes. They created a design where Oxford shirt sleeves were rolled over the misfit sweater. It allowed them to showcase their go-to fashion and created opportunity to be successful and avoid potential failure. Because of this fashion show the business earned $100 million in annual sales. 

All of these lessons have influenced the Burch children’s careers. In college, Chloe and Neely pursued online ventures separately. Since they have joined forces, their handbags line is in more than 140 retailers nationwide. Their experiences have even helped their younger brother Roby. Roby is currently trying to launch a premium outdoor lifestyle brand. Bob believes that working as a team has not only created a bond between them, but will lead them to a more fulfilling life.

Credit given to:  Baker, M. (2019, April 29). A Generation of Siblings, Raised to Be Entrepreneurs. 

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

This Week’s Author – Brianna Anello

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | IRS Audit Rate Falls – Should You Relax? July 24, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

I cringe every time the newspaper headlines read that the IRS audit rate is falling. My worries are that our clients may become lazy on their record keeping along with the retention of appropriate supporting business documentation (e.g. receipts, cancelled checks, deposits slips, paid bills, invoices, etc.). Thankfully, my fears have remained unfounded as the stakes are too high with the IRS to become complacent.

As a side note, many taxpayers fail to realize that if your record keeping is poor – the IRS simply won’t use your records. Instead, the IRS may consider all of your deposits as taxable income whether they were otherwise taxable or not. And, if no supporting documentation was retained then all of your expenses may be disallowed. Ouch!

On May 21, 2019, the WSJ ran an article authored by Richard Rubin, IRS’s Audit Rate Continues to Fall. This article below shares further insights on who is being audited and to what extent the IRS budget is being increased.  

                                                                    -Mark Bradstreet

WASHINGTON—The Internal Revenue Service audited just 0.59% of individual tax returns last year, marking the seventh consecutive annual decline as the tax agency copes with smaller budgets and fewer workers.

That total was down from 0.62% the year before and hit the lowest mark since 2002, according to data released Monday.

Audits of the highest-income households dropped sharply, to their lowest levels since the IRS began reporting that data in 2008. In fiscal 2018, the IRS audited 6.66% of returns of filers with more than $10 million in adjusted gross income, down from 14.52% in 2017. Among households with income between $1 million and $5 million, the audit rate dropped from 3.52% to 2.21%.

The IRS released the data as it is trying to persuade Congress to make long-run investments in the agency’s technology and enforcement staff. So far, however, key Republicans in Congress remain skeptical, and there are mixed signals about whether the government will reverse the steady decline in tax enforcement.

“I’m not averse to beefing up their budget a little bit but I want to see results,” said Sen. John Kennedy (R., La.), who heads the subcommittee that oversees the IRS budget. “I’ve got a lot of confidence in the new commissioner and in the new secretary, but I’m not into just throwing money at the wall because the bureaucracy says we need more.”

President Trump has proposed boosting the IRS’s budget by 1.5% for the fiscal year that starts Oct. 1, to $11.5 billion from $11.3 billion, including a down payment on improving the agency’s technology.

The administration also is proposing a $15 billion, decadelong increase in IRS enforcement funding, which the agency says would generate $47 billion in additional federal revenue. That net gain of more than $30 billion would come from enforcing existing laws.

The IRS has been shrinking steadily, partly because electronic filing has increased its efficiency. But many of the recent changes have stemmed from Republican spending cuts after they took control of the House in 2011 and after the IRS said in 2013 that it had improperly scrutinized some conservative nonprofit groups.

Adjusted for inflation, the 2019 IRS budget is smaller than in 2000 and is 19% below peak funding in 2010, according to the Government Accountability Office. The agency’s workforce declined 4% in 2018 and is now 21% below where it was eight years ago, and the number of examiners that performs audits shrunk 38% from 2010 to 2017, according to the agency’s inspector general. Those cuts came as Congress handed the IRS more responsibility to administer the Affordable Care Act and police offshore bank accounts.

Declining IRS resources contributed to the decline in audits but weren’t the only cause, said David Kautter, assistant Treasury secretary for tax policy, who was acting IRS commissioner for much of fiscal 2018.

“In this age of technology, it’s easier to identify areas of noncompliance,” he said Monday.

Democrats say the IRS budget cuts are disproportionately benefiting high-income households.

“Republicans in the Senate and the House have been very much geared towards a policy that has produced lots of poor people being audited and lots of well-off people basically getting off the hook,” said Sen. Ron Wyden (D., Ore.), the top Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee. “It takes more resources. There’s no way around it.”

Mr. Kennedy said he wants more details on the IRS modernization plans, pointing to the agency’s difficulties overhauling its technology.

Sen. James Lankford (R., Okla.) said he wants more updated information on the tax gap—the difference between taxes owed and taxes paid—which should be released in the coming months.

“We need to be able to see it and know what we actually could get a return on, from enforcement,” he said.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates that an extra $20 billion spent on IRS enforcement could yield $55 billion over the next decade and more beyond that as audits generate revenue. Once the IRS completed staff training and computer upgrades, the government could get as much as $5.20 in additional revenue for every $1 spent, according to CBO.

The agency started 2,886 criminal investigations in 2018, down from 5,234 just five years earlier, according to the agency’s inspector general. The IRS criminal investigations unit had 26% fewer special agents than it did in 2012.

The IRS also has fewer employees working to collect taxes from people who already owe. Each collections officer generates about $2 million a year, which means the smaller IRS is leaving $3.3 billion a year on the table, just from collections, according to the agency’s inspector general.

Tax experts say the agency’s performance could be improved through better taxpayer service and a simpler tax system. So would rules that gave the IRS more information about sources of income—such as profits from cash businesses—that they lack now.

Taxpayers are extremely likely to comply with tax rules when the IRS independently has access to information about their finances. Wages reported on Form W-2 almost always show up on tax returns. When the IRS doesn’t have withholding payments or information, people are more likely to underreport their income.

“I don’t believe the solution is more agents, more audits and more intrusive government into taxpayers,” said Rep. Kevin Brady (R., Texas), the top Republican on the House Ways and Means Committee. “I think it’s smarter audits.”

But the drops in enforcement and the IRS budget have run in tandem, and the nonpartisan estimates from CBO, GAO and the IRS inspector general say reversing the spending cuts would generate money.

“We’re just in never-never land here. The IRS has had its capacity to do its job attacked. There’s no other way to say it,” Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D., Ore.) said at a recent hearing. “They can’t keep pace with what they’re up against.”

Credit given to:  Richard Rubin. This article was written May 20, 2019. You can write to Richard Rubin at richard.rubin@wsj.com

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author – Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | What May Be The Best Investment Ever? July 17, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Uncategorized , add a comment

Longer ago than I care to admit, a client gave me some sage advice that I have never been able to improve upon. His father had told him that the best investment you can ever make is in yourself. One reason being is that there is no other investment that you will have ever more control over. I have found this advice to be very profound and useful.

Ted Jenkin, co-CEO and founder of oXYGen Financial offers further thoughts on this topic as published in the WSJ on June 17, 2019.  

                                -Mark Bradstreet

Invest 2% of your income in you

When we think about investments, we often direct our attention to categories such as stocks, bonds and real estate. What we often don’t think about is our most valuable asset: our ability to earn an income and to make that income grow faster.

Almost 20 years ago, I met a successful business owner who gave me a simple lesson: Invest 2% of everything you earn annually back into your ability to grow your income.

What does this mean exactly? Investing in you is like diversifying your portfolio of investments. You might take a chance and invest in that side hustle you think could be a business. Take a training course or advanced education that could further your current career. Invest in a personal coach who could improve your business performance. It could mean investing in an exercise or nutrition program that could give you more stamina every day to accomplish more.

It’s the best advice I’ve ever received—and I do it every single year.

Credit given to:  Ted Jenkin, co-CEO and founder of oXYGen Financial

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

This Week’s Author – Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.