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Business Closures March 17, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, General, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

If you can coughup $99 for the State of Ohio, you may form a business entity such as an LLC or a corporation. Granted that you must have a unique business name i.e., you may not use the same or similar name as another Ohio business. If the Secretary of State’s Office website is up and running, an official company may literally be formed online in minutes.  IRS FEINs (if needed) are free and may also be generated online. Ohio charges a nominal fee for a Vendor’s License which is used to collect Ohio sales tax. Setting-up payroll (only if you have employees) is also very inexpensive although several forms are necessary. Of course, if you have payroll you also need to register for state unemployment, worker’s compensation and city withholding if applicable. Many of these forms and applications have “trick” questions, so beware. Where am I going with all of this is – that to begin an Ohio business, it is pretty darn easy and inexpensive.

So, it would only be natural to assume that closing a business in the Buckeye State would be just as easy.  I suspicion you know where I am going with all of this.  Shutting down a business can be very difficult, cumbersome, time consuming and expensive. The state, IRS as well as any cities and payroll entities involved are all incredibly concerned that you may shutter your doors, close your bank accounts and still owe them money. So, to truly close your business, LOTS of hoops must be jumped through, forms prepared etc. Businesses are typically closed for financial difficulties which is painful enough. Adding insult to injury, you may owe taxes for many reasons such as delinquent sales taxes, past due payroll taxes and worker’s compensation, IRS taxes, Ohio taxes, city taxes and so forth and so on…  Some of these liabilities may become personal liabilities that need dealt with. 

You don’t want to run out of runway when closing down a business. It requires proper planning, finances and foresight for a proper shutdown. Professional advice is highly suggested during what may be a difficult time. 

– Mark Bradstreet     

Closing Because of the Pandemic? Beware of Potential Tax Hits.

Thousands of small businesses have shut down because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Adding insult to injury, many are facing tax hits as they wind down.

Small businesses have felt the brunt of the COVID-19 pandemic, with thousands of enterprises forced to close since the beginning of March.

As if going under because of a pandemic isn’t bad enough, some will face tax hits from their closures if they aren’t careful. Moreover, some are left wondering what to do with their COVID-19 loans and grants. As a result, instead of being able to walk away after closing up shop, they’re forced to navigate taxes and potential penalties.

“The last thing people think about when wrapping up a business is their tax obligations,” Mike Slack, senior tax research analyst at H&R Block’s The Tax Institute, told business.com. “They are running at a loss; they didn’t generate any taxable income. But there are still a lot of tax implications.”

Whether it’s filing your business’s final tax return or determining if you have to treat COVID-19 loans as income, there are several things small business owners have to consider when closing operations.

PPP loan proceeds may be taxable.

In the early days of the pandemic, the federal government released more than $2 trillion in aid under the CARES Act, with billions of dollars going to help small businesses stay afloat. Under the act’s Paycheck Protection Program, small business owners received loans that were forgivable if they used the money to keep workers on the payroll.

Despite all these efforts, thousands of small businesses couldn’t survive. Now they’re left wondering if they have to pay taxes on the money they received or, worse, pay back the loans.

“As currently written in the CARES Act, PPP proceeds are not taxable, but the IRS made a determination in notice 2020-32 that indeed it is taxable in a back-ended way,” said Mark Alaimo, who sits on the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants‘ (AICPA) Personal Financial Specialist Committee.

Under this IRS rule, PPP borrowers can’t deduct the expenses they incur to qualify for loan forgiveness. It throws murkiness into the mix and is a rule the AICPA is squarely against.

“That means if you have a $200,000 loss and if you received a $250,000 loan, you may have $50,000 worth of income,” Alaimo said. “The easiest thing people can do is assume all PPP proceeds are taxable income even if it’s been forgiven.”

According to Alaimo, most states have already indicated that they will tax any forgiven PPP loans just as they would tax any other forgiven debt. However, if your business loan wasn’t forgiven before you shut down operations, you may have to pay it back – plus taxes – unless you file for bankruptcy.

Forgiveness of debt can be a taxable event.

If you’re writing off debt as part of your business shutdown, it could trigger a taxable event. Like PPP loans, any reduction in debt you negotiate as part of your closing may be subject to tax. Let’s say you owe $100,000 to a creditor and they forgive you that debt: That $100,000 is treated as taxable income, according to John Smallwood, president of Smallwood Wealth Management.

Keep the IRS in the loop.

To avoid tax penalties, you have to make your business closure official. To do that, you must file your final tax return with the IRS. Whether you operate a partnershipC corporationS corporation or sole proprietorship, the IRS needs to know your business is closed.

“The final tax return is due within three to four months after the business date it closed,” said Slack said. “People get in trouble with that. Late filings are subject to penalties.”  

When filing your final taxes, Slack said, be mindful of how you account for proceeds from the sale of business assets. “When you sell assets, you are still supposed to report them as a disposition on your tax return. There’s a lot of nuances to it.”

“A lot of nuances” is particularly true during the COVID-19 pandemic, as business owners navigate forced closures and social distancing rules. Some run into tax trouble, despite states’ assurances.

That was the case with Heather Manto, owner and operator of Independence Barber Co. in Austin, Texas. To help businesses forced to shut down by the pandemic, Texas announced that it would extend the sales tax due dates and waive late fees. That was a relief to Manto, who had no income as her shop remained shuttered. But when she paid her sales tax a week late, she got hit with a penalty.

“Getting a human on the phone at that time was impossible, so I just paid and lived with it,” said Manto, who has since reopened her business. “It’s just a small example, but for a small business like mine, even those minor things hurt an already-pained business.”

Sweat the small stuff.

Paying sales tax late isn’t the only thing that can get you in trouble with the IRS or local tax collectors. You can face penalties for myriad reasons. The two big ones in dissolving a small business are neglecting to notify the state and failing to pay payroll taxes.

1. Notify the state.

Unless you file dissolution documents with the state where you operated, your business is not closed in the state’s eyes.

“As far as the state is concerned, they think you are still running your business and may hit you with state taxes for that year,” said Lisa Lewis, CPA and editor of the TurboTax Blog.

Make sure to cancel your employer identification number (EIN) and close your IRS business account. That requires you to send the IRS a letter that includes the business name, EIN, address and the reason you’re closing the account. The business remains open until you’ve filed all the required returns and paid all the taxes you owe.

2. Don’t forget payroll taxes.

If you have any employees, you must not only pay them their final wages, but also make good on any payroll taxes and report employment taxes. Failure to withhold or deposit employee income, Social Security and Medicare taxes could subject you to the trust fund recovery penalty.

Taxes are an unavoidable headache of starting, running and closing a business. But they shouldn’t be ignored; the last thing you want to do is simply walk away.

“You really have to be deliberate and thoughtful when winding up your business,” Smallwood said. “You have to make sure there are no personal problems and consequences that come as a result of your failed business.” 

Credit given to: Donna Fuscaldo. She is a business.com Writer. This article was published on Nov 10, 2020.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.
.

Bonus Depreciation: A Simple Guide for Businesses February 17, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Depreciation options, General, Section 168, Section 179, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

In our tax and business planning meetings, we tend to drone on forever about the use of accelerated depreciation methods. Not that long ago, our first choice was Section 179; and, Section 168 (bonus depreciation) was our second choice. Reason being that, unlike Section 179, Section 168 was originally for NEW property only. That has changed in the last few years and now qualifying property for Section 168 may be NEW OR USED. Also, unlike Section 179, Section 168 does not have a ceiling on qualifying purchases. The business plan is a fundamental tool and is necessary for a startup that needs a sense of direction. The business plan also typically includes a brief look at the industry within which the business will operate and how the business will differentiate itself from the competition. If you are looking for professional Business Plans Writers make sure to check out this url https://wimgo.com/s/usa/business-plan-writers/.

Who doesn’t love a bonus? If you purchase fixed assets for your business, one bonus you want to get familiar with is bonus depreciation. Here’s a look at what you need to know about this valuable tax-saving tool.

What is bonus depreciation?

Depreciation allows a business to write off the cost of an asset over its useful life, or the number of years the asset will be used in the business. For example, if you purchase a $10,000 piece of machinery that you’ll use for ten years, rather than expense the full $10,000 in year one, you might write off $1,000 per year for ten years.

That $1,000 write-off is nice, but it might not be enough of an incentive to encourage you to reinvest in your business–and Congress wants business owners to stimulate the economy by purchasing assets. That’s why they invented bonus depreciation.

Bonus depreciation is a way to accelerate depreciation. It allows a business to write off more of the cost of an asset in the year the company starts using it.

Thanks to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA), a business can now write off up to 100% of the cost of eligible property purchased after September 27, 2017 and before January 1, 2023, up from 50% under the prior law. However, that 100% limit will begin to phase down after 2022. Starting in 2023, the rate for bonus depreciation will be:

To take advantage of bonus depreciation:

Step 1: Purchase qualified business property.

Qualified business property includes:

Step 2: Place the property in service

Placing property in service means you have to start using the asset in your business. For example, if you purchase a piece of machinery in December of 2020, but don’t install it or start using it until January of 2021, you would have to wait until you file your 2021 tax return to claim bonus depreciation on the machinery.

Step 3: Claim bonus depreciation on your tax return

You can write off up to 100% of the cost of the asset on Form 4562, which gets filed along with your business tax return.

Frequently asked questions about bonus depreciation

Depreciation is complicated, so many business owners have questions about when and how bonus depreciation applies to their business. Here are some common ones.

Do I have to take bonus depreciation?

If you purchase depreciable property in your business, depreciating the property isn’t optional–it’s required.
But bonus depreciation isn’t mandatory. If you purchase property that qualifies for bonus depreciation, and for whatever reason don’t want to write off 100% of the cost, you can elect not to take it. Instead, you can use the applicable MACRS depreciation method instead.

Is bonus depreciation the same as Section 179?

Business owners often confuse bonus depreciation with the Section 179 deduction because they both allow a business to write off the cost of qualified property immediately. While these two tax breaks serve a similar purpose, they aren’t the same.

A business can’t claim Section 179 unless it has a taxable profit. For example, if your business has $5,000 of taxable income before taking the Section 179 deduction into account, and you purchase a $10,000 piece of machinery, your Section 179 deduction is limited to $5,000. At that point, you can opt to claim regular depreciation on the remaining $5,000 or carry your unused Section 179 deduction forward and deduct it in a future tax year.

On the other hand, bonus depreciation isn’t limited by the business’ taxable income. Returning to the previous example, you could take a Section 179 deduction of $5,000 to reduce your taxable income to zero, then take bonus depreciation for the remaining $5,000.

Are there different bonus depreciation rules for vehicles?

Depending on the type and size of the vehicle, there may be different bonus depreciation limits. The IRS sets different limits for vehicles to keep people from claiming large tax deductions on luxury cars or ones that are used mainly for personal driving.

For example, vehicles with a gross vehicle weight (GVW) rating of 6,000 pounds or less are limited to $8,000 of bonus depreciation in the first year they’re placed in service.

On the other hand, heavy vehicles with a GVW rating above 6,000 pounds that are used more than 50% for business can deduct 100% of the cost.

Can I claim bonus depreciation on used property?

The TCJA expanded the definition of qualified property to include used property. Previously, only new assets were eligible for bonus depreciation.

However, to be eligible for bonus depreciation, the property must meet the following requirements:

Bonus depreciation can be a valuable tax break for businesses that purchase furniture, equipment, and other fixed assets. However, depreciation laws and limits are always changing.

Before you decide to buy property, it’s a good idea to talk to your tax professional to be sure you’re making the right move for your business.

Credit Given to:   Janet Berry-Johnson, CPA. This article was published on November 3, 2020.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

A Checklist of Business Deductions January 6, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Deductions, Depreciation options, General, Section 168, Section 179, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes , add a comment

Sara Sugar has created a list of small business deductions as shown below.  It is a great list to scan through and see if you have been overlooking any tax deductions.  Always fine to call us with any questions or comments you may have.

                                 -Mark Bradstreet

THE ULTIMATE LIST OF SMALL BUSINESS TAX DEDUCTIONS

Every small business owner wants to save money — and small business tax deductions are one way to do exactly that.

This list of 37 deductions will take you from “Ugh, taxes” to “Taxes? I got this.”

1. Vehicle Expenses.
Keep records during the year to prove the use of your car, truck or van, for business, especially if you also use the vehicle for personal reasons. When it’s time to pay taxes, you can choose to deduct your actual expenses (including gasoline, maintenance, parking, and tolls), or you can take the more straightforward route of using the IRS standard mileage rate — 58 cents per mile in 2019.

Whether you’re running errands in your own car or making deliveries in your bakery van, track the mileage and run some numbers to see which method gives you the higher deduction. If you drive a lot of miles each year, it makes more sense to use the standard mileage deduction when filing taxes. However, if you have an older vehicle that regularly needs maintenance, or isn’t fuel efficient, you might be able to get a larger deduction by using your actual expenses vs. the IRS mileage rate.

Either way, we all know that gas, repairs, parking, and mileage add up, so taking advantage of the standard mileage rate, or deducting your actual expenses, is a no-brainer way to put some of that money back in your pocket. Just make sure you keep records diligently to avoid mixing personal expenses with business ones.

2. Home Office.
Do you run part of your small business out of your home, maybe doing the books in the evenings after you’ve parked your food truck for the night? Or perhaps you run an entirely home-based business. For many self-employed individuals and sole proprietors, it’s pretty standard to have a space at home that’s devoted to your work. The key here is the word devoted. Sometimes doing work on at the kitchen table while your kids do their homework doesn’t count as a home office. You must have a specific room that’s dedicated to being your office in order for it to be tax deductible.

Calculating the size of your deduction is primarily related to the amount of your home that’s used as an office. For example:

Total square footage of your home / divided into square footage used as an office = the percentage of direct and indirect expenses (rent, utilities, insurance, repairs, etc.) that can be deducted.

We highly recommend that you read the IRS’ literature on this particular tax deduction, and/or speak with a tax professional before filing taxes with this deduction. It’s one of the more complicated ones available to small business owners, and there have been numerous court cases and controversies over the years. When dealing with the potential for a costly audit, it pays to be safe by consulting a professional tax preparer rather than sorry.

3. Bonus Depreciation.
If you buy new capital equipment, such as a new oven for your pizzeria, you get a depreciation tax break that lets you deduct 100 percent of your costs upon purchase. Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, 100% bonus depreciation only pertains to equipment purchased and placed in use between September 27, 2017 and January 1, 2023 — something to keep in mind as you plan for new equipment purchases in the next few years.

It’s important to note that according to the IRS, the asset you purchase must meet the following three requirements:

A few things that don’t count as assets include:

4. Professional Services.
As a small business, you don’t have in-house accountants or attorneys, but that doesn’t mean you can’t deduct their services. If you hire a consultant to help you grow your gift shop’s outreach, the fees and overall expense you pay for those services are deductible. Make sure the fees you’re paying are reasonable and necessary for the deduction to count by checking with the appropriate IRS publication or a tax professional. But you’d do that anyway, wouldn’t you?

5. Salaries and Wages.
If you’re a sole proprietor or your company is an LLC, you may not be able to deduct draws and income that you take from your business. However, salaries and wages that you pay to those faithful part-time and full-time employees behind the cash register are indeed deductible.

However, this doesn’t just stop at standard salaries and wages. Other payments like bonuses, meals, lodging, per diem, allowances, and some employer-paid taxes are also deductible. You can even deduct the cost of payroll software and systems in many cases.

6. Work Opportunity Tax Credit.
Have you hired military veterans or other long-term unemployed people to work behind your counter? If so, you may be eligible to take advantage of the Work Opportunity Tax Credit of 40 percent of your first $6,000 in wages.

7. Office Supplies and Expenses.
If you’re running a frozen yogurt shop, when you hear the word “supplies,” you probably think of plastic spoons. However, even if your business doesn’t have a traditional office, you can still deduct conventional business supplies and office expenses, as long as they are used within the year they’re purchased, so set up a file for your receipts. Many times, you can also deduct the cost of postage, shipping, and delivery services so if mail-order is a part of your business, be sure to keep track of this cost.

8. Client and Employee Entertainment.
Yes, you can take small business deductions for schmoozing your clients, as long as you do indeed discuss business with them, and as long as the entertainment occurs in a business setting and for business purposes. In some cases, you can’t deduct the full amount of your entertainment expenses, but every bit helps.

Here are some tips to guide when and what you can deduct:

(Please note:  the TCJA affected Meals & Entertainment deductions beginning in 2018.)

9. Freelance/Independent Contractor Labor.
If you bring in independent contractors to keep your checkout lines moving during the holidays or to create new marketing materials for your shop, you can deduct your costs. Make sure you issue Form 1099-NEC to anyone who earned $600 or more from you during the tax year.

10. Furniture and Equipment.
Did you buy new chairs for your eat-in bakery or new juicing blenders for your juice bar this year? You have a choice regarding how you take your small business tax deduction for furniture and equipment. You can either deduct the entire cost for the tax year in which it was purchased, or you can depreciate the purchases over a seven-year period. The IRS has specific regulations that govern your choices here, so make sure you’re following the rules and make the right choice between depreciation and full deduction.

11. Employee Benefits.
The benefits that businesses like yours offer to employees do more than attract high-quality talent to your team. They also have tax benefits. Keep track of all contributions you make to your employees’ health plans, life insurance, pensions, profit-sharing, education reimbursement programs, and more. They’re all tax-deductible.

12. Computer Software.
You can now deduct the full cost of business software as a small business tax deduction, rather than depreciating it as in years past. This includes your POS software and all software you use to run your business.

13. Rent on Your Business Location.
You undoubtedly pay rent for your pet store or candy shop. Make sure you deduct it.

14. Startup Expenses.
If you’ve just opened your gift shop or convenience store, you may be able to deduct up to $5,000 in start-up costs and expenses that you incurred before you opened your doors for business. These can include marketing and advertising costs, travel, and employee pay for training.

15. Utilities.
Don’t miss the small business tax deductions for your electricity, mobile phone, and other utilities. If you use the home office deduction, your landline must be dedicated to your business to be deductible.

16. Travel Expenses.
Most industries offer some form of trade show or professional event where similar businesses can gather to discuss trends, meet with vendors, sell goods and discuss industry news. If you’re traveling to a trade show, you can take a small business deduction for all your expenses, including airfare, hotels, meals on the road, automobile expenses – whether you use the IRS standard mileage rate or actual expenses – and even tipping your cab driver.

There are also deductions for expenses that might not immediately come to mind, like:

In order for your trip to qualify for a travel deduction, it must meet the following criteria:

As with all deductions, it’s imperative that you keep receipts and records of all business travel expenses you plan to deduct in case of an audit.

17. Taxes.
Deducting taxes is a little tricky because the small business deduction depends on the type of tax. Deduct all licenses and fees, as well as taxes on any real estate your business owns. You should also deduct all sales taxes that you have collected from the customers at your deli. You can also deduct your share of the FICA, FUTA, and state unemployment taxes that you pay on behalf of your employees.

18. Commissions.
If you have salespeople working on commission, those payments are tax-deductible. You can also take a small business tax deduction for third-party commissions, such as those you might pay in an affiliate marketing set-up.

19. Machinery and Equipment Rental.
Sometimes renting equipment for your coffee shop or concession stand is beneficial to your bottom line, since you can deduct these business expenses in the year they occur with no depreciation.

20. Interest on Loans.
If you take out a business line of credit, the interest you pay is completely deductible as a small business tax deduction. If you take out a personal loan and funnel some of the proceeds into your business, however, the tax application becomes somewhat more complicated.

21. Inventory for Service-Based Businesses.
Inventory normally isn’t deductible. However, if you’re a service-based business and you use the cash method of accounting (instead of the standard accrual method typically used for businesses with inventory), you can treat some inventory as supplies and deduct them. For instance, if you’re an ice cream shop but you sell your special hot fudge sauce as a product, your inventory may be deductible. Consult a tax professional to see if you qualify.

22. Bad Debts.
Did you advance money to an employee or vendor, and then not receive repayment or the goods or services you thought you were contracting for? If so, you may be able to treat this bad business debt as a small business deduction.

23. Employee Education and Child Care Assistance.
If you go above and beyond with your employee benefits, you may be able to take small business tax deductions for education assistance and dependent care assistance. The IRS is pretty much rewarding you here for being a great employer. So, take a bow, and the deduction.

24. Mortgage Interest.
If your business owns its own building, even if it’s just a hot dog stand, you can deduct all your mortgage interest.

25. Bank Charges.
Don’t forget to deduct the fees your bank charges you for your business accounts. Even any ATM fees are deductible.

26. Disaster and Theft Losses.
If your business is unfortunate enough to suffer theft or to be the victim of a natural disaster during the year, you may be able to turn any losses that your insurance company didn’t reimburse into a small business tax deduction.

27. Carryovers From Previous Years.
Some small business tax deductions carry over from year to year. For instance, if you had a capital loss in a previous year, you may be able to take it in the current year. Specifics often change from year to year, so make sure you’re up to date on the latest IRS regulations.

28. Insurance.
The insurance premiums you pay for coverage on your business is all tax-deductible. To qualify, your insurance must provide coverage that is “ordinary and necessary.”

This could include coverage for:

There are a few insurance types that you can’t deduct, the most common being life insurance. If you’re not sure whether you can deduct a certain type of insurance, and that deduction is an important factor in your decision, please speak with a tax professional first and save yourself any unnecessary expenses.

29. Home Renovations and Insurance.
Did you take a deduction for a home office already? If so, business expenses related to any renovations to that part of your home are also deductible, and so is the percentage of your homeowner’s insurance that covers that part of your home. Remember, all small business deductions related to home offices only apply if you use part of your home exclusively for business.

30. Tools.
The IRS distinguishes between tools and equipment. While you may have to capitalize on equipment rather than deducting it in one year, you can deduct tools that aren’t expensive or that have a life of only a year or less. And for the IRS, “tools” doesn’t just refer to hammers or screwdrivers; your spatulas and cookie sheets are tools as well.

31. Unpaid Goods.
If your business produces goods rather than providing a service, you can deduct the cost of any goods that you haven’t been paid for yet.

32. Education.
Did you attend any seminars, workshops or classes in the past year that were designed to help you improve your job skills? Your work-related educational expenses may be deductible, especially if they’re required to keep up or renew a professional license. Remember, they have to be work-related. If you own a bar or cafe, you won’t be able to deduct skiing lessons.

33. Advertising and Marketing.
You already know that providing amazing goods and services isn’t enough to make your business succeed. You also need to advertise so your potential customers can find you. Advertising and marketing dollars can add up fast, but fortunately, they are all tax-deductible.

This is great news since advertising and marketing are often of the biggest business expenses that small businesses need to deal with as they get off the ground. Rest assured, you can deduct everything from flyers to billboards to business cards, and even a new website. Political advertising is the biggest exception to this rule. Those expenses are not deductible.

34. Charitable Deductions.
Yes, your small business can donate to charity and take a deduction for it. It can donate supplies, money, or property to a recognized charity, but pay attention to the rules before you go crazy giving stuff away. Donations of your time don’t count, and you can’t wipe out your business income with donations. Also, check with the IRS before you make a charitable deduction to make sure the organization you want to support qualifies for the deduction.

35. Cleaning and Janitorial Expenses.
You know all too well that the workday isn’t over when you flip the sign on the door to say “Closed.” If you hire any type of cleaning service, make sure you take your small business tax deduction.

36. Moving Expenses.
Did you need to move to start your business? If you’re a sole proprietor or self-employed worker and you had to move more than 50 miles for business, you may be able to deduct some of your moving expenses from your taxes. Specifically, you may be able to deduct packing and transportation costs, utility and service connection fees, and travel costs. However, you can’t deduct the cost of any meals or security deposits you’ve had to pay.

Lastly, to qualify for these deductions, you will need to remain a full-time employee of the business that required you to move for at least 78 weeks out of the following two years.

37. Intangibles like Licenses, Trademarks, and other Intellectual Property.
Most of the time, expenses related to the registering or protection of intellectual property are deductible. However, the process you go about it can differ depending on what you’re trying to deduct. Some costs must be depreciated over multiple years, while others can be fully deducted within the year in which they were incurred. For example, licensing fees are typically considered capital expenses that must be depreciated. However, trademarks can often be deducted in the same tax year. If you’re uncertain, we recommend working with a tax professional to ensure you’re in compliance with the regulations governing your specific situation.

No matter what type of small business entity you have, you have to pay quarterly estimated taxes if the business owes income taxes of $1,000 or more. Corporations only have to pay quarterly estimated taxes if they expect to owe $500 or more in tax for the year.

Before you owned a business, filing taxes was a one-time thing. But as a small business owner, you’ll have to pay the IRS four times per year. On one hand, that’s four more tax deadlines you might miss. But on the bright side, by the time your yearly tax deadline comes around, you’ll have already paid three-quarters of your tax return.

To make things even more complicated, businesses must deposit federal income tax withheld from employees, federal unemployment taxes, and both the employer and employee social security and Medicare taxes. Depositing can be on a semi-weekly or monthly schedule.

Whether you’re filing your taxes quarterly or holding off for the next annual deadline, you should begin preparing for your taxes by keeping records of your expenses as of January of each year. Make sure to document each of these small business tax deductions by keeping physical receipts and writing down the business reason for the expense on your receipts as soon as you receive it.

With this comprehensive list of small business tax deductions, you’ll be well on your way to saving on your taxes this year. However, deductions can be tricky, it’s always best to consult a tax expert for any questions that might arise to ensure you are complying with all regulation and avoid any penalties.

Credit given to Sara Sugar. Published in MONEY & PROFITS on Jan 21, 2020.  

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

5 New Rules for Charitable Giving October 14, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Charitable Giving, Deductions, Depreciation options, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes , add a comment

New tax laws and strategies can help you maximize tax breaks for yourself and benefits for the charity.

THERE ARE SO MANY reasons to make charitable gifts this year – whether it’s to support nonprofits that help people and communities with challenges from the coronavirus pandemic, or to provide assistance after disasters such as the Beirut explosion or an active hurricane season.

Even though a lot of people are struggling financially right now, many people whose finances have stabilized want to do whatever they can to help out. And they’re not waiting until the end of the year to make their gifts. “A lot of things are driving people to be generous, and our numbers prove it,” says Kim Laughton, president of Schwab Charitable, which runs Schwab’s donor-advised funds. From January through June 2020, its donors recommended over $1.7 billion in 330,000 grants, almost a 50% increase in the dollars granted and the number of grants compared to the same period in 2019. “There’s great need out there, and people are stepping up.”

“Philanthropy and giving is on everyone’s mind,” says Dien Yuen, who holds the Blunt-Nickel Professorship in Philanthropy at the American College of Financial Services. Some nonprofits need help now just to stay afloat. “The donors who are quite active are making gifts now and not waiting until later in the year, because the nonprofit might not be there later on.”

New tax laws and strategies can help you maximize tax breaks for yourself and the benefits for the charity. Here’s what you need to know:

New $300 Charitable Deduction for Non-Itemizers

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, created several incentives for people to help charities right away, including a charitable deduction of up to $300 in 2020, even if you don’t itemize. Otherwise, you generally need to itemize to take the charitable deduction, which fewer people do since the standard deduction doubled a few years ago – now at $12,400 for single filers and $24,800 for married couples filing jointly in 2020.

“As a result of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, most taxpayers utilize the significantly higher standard deduction instead of itemizing deductions for mortgage interest, state taxes paid and charitable contributions,” says Mark Alaimo, a certified public accountant and certified financial planner in Lawrence, Massachusetts. “This special CARES Act provision now gives a tax incentive to all taxpayers to give at least $300 to charity during 2020.” To qualify, the gift must be made in cash and go directly to the charity, rather than to a donor-advised fund or private foundation.

“I think that the additional $300 provision in the CARES Act is really great, especially for the younger generation who may be just starting to work and may not be paying substantial mortgage interest,” says Kelsey Clair, tax strategist for Baird’s Private Wealth Management Group. “It allows them to give even in a small way and reap the tax benefit for it.”

The CARES Act also helps people who are in a financial position to make very large gifts. In 2020, you can deduct cash gifts of up to 100% of your adjusted gross income, rather than the usual 60% limit. To qualify for this higher limit, the gifts must go directly to the charities, rather than to a donor-advised fund or private foundation. This can help wealthy people reduce their taxable income significantly in 2020, and it may also help retirees who have money to give but bump up against the income limits for the deduction. “I see it in the older generation who have a lot of cash but don’t have a lot of income coming in and are trying to help out the community in any way they can,” says Clair.

Bunching Contributions and Donor-Advised Funds

Bunching contributions is a strategy that became popular after the standard deduction was increased. Instead of making smaller charitable contributions spread over several years, you can make larger contributions in one year so you can itemize your deductions (and claim the charitable deduction) that year, then take the standard deduction in the other years. “Rather than making a steady stream of charitable contributions from year to year, it may be beneficial instead to use a bunching strategy – give more and itemize in one year, and claim the standard deduction in other years,” says Clair.

Even though this can help you tax-wise, you might not want to give all of the money to the charities at one time and then neglect them over the next few years. But bunching can work well if you have a donor-advised fund. These funds are offered by brokerage firms, banks and community foundations, and you can take the charitable deduction in the year you give the money to the donor-advised fund, but then you have an unlimited amount of time to decide which charities to support. You can usually open a donor-advised fund with an initial contribution of $5,000 to $10,000 (it’s $5,000 at Schwab and Fidelity, $10,000 at T. Rowe Price, and $25,000 at Vanguard). You can make grants to charities of $50 or $100 up to thousands of dollars or more, and you can invest the money in a handful of mutual funds or investing pools until you make the grants. “It can be a great way to go ahead and make the contribution, without having to decide where that money goes right away,” says Clair.

Another benefit of the donor-advised fund is simplicity – you get one receipt for your tax records when you make the contribution and don’t have to wait for a variety of paperwork from each of the charities. “Donor-advised funds really help with the administrative side of things,” says Elliot Dole, a certified financial planner with Buckingham Strategic Wealth in St. Louis. “Itemizing charitable gifts is a hot button audit area. But with a donor-advised fund, it’s clear that you met the requirements.”

A Double Tax Break From Giving Appreciated Stock

Many people just write a check to the charity, but you may get a bigger tax benefit if you give appreciated stock. If you owned the stock for more than a year, you can deduct the value of the stock on the date you give it to the charity if you itemize. And even if you don’t itemize, you can avoid having to pay long-term capital gains taxes on your profits, which could have cost up to 20% if you sold the stock first. (Giving appreciated stock doesn’t qualify for the special $300 charitable deduction for non-itemizers for 2020; that only applies to cash.)

Most charities can accept appreciated stock, but the process can be easier if you have a donor-advised fund. “Given how volatile the stock market can be, many advisors recommend utilizing donor-advised funds due to the ease and speed that one can make a contribution,” says Alaimo. “This makes it easier to opportunistically gift highly appreciated securities, while regulating which charity receives how much of the donation, and when they receive it.”

It’s even easier if your brokerage account and donor-advised fund are with the same company. “When you log into your Schwab accounts, it shows your investment accounts, your bank accounts and your charitable account,” says Laughton. You can sort your investments by most highly appreciated or highly concentrated and see if you’re overweighted in one area. “We encourage people to rebalance their portfolios regularly, and when they see they’re overconcentrated, instead of selling those shares, they can just move them over to their charitable account,” says Laughton.

With so much stock market volatility this year, you may want to donate the stock when it reaches a target price, rather than giving at a certain time of year.

The donor-advised fund can also accept a variety of contributions – whether you write a check or you give appreciated stock, privately held stock, real estate, limited partnerships or even a horse farm. “It always makes sense for people who have highly appreciated non-cash assets to at least explore whether they could make good charitable gifts,” says Laughton. “Donor-advised funds can make that simple and easy.”

If you have investments that have lost value, however, it’s better to sell them first – and take a Charitable loss – and then give the cash to charity. “I’ve seen multiple times where people made mistakes of donating stocks that were in a loss,” says Clair. “It’s better to sell that and claim the loss on your return and donate the cash.” When you sell the losing stock, you can use the loss to offset your capital gains and can use up to $3,000 in losses to reduce your ordinary income, which you couldn’t do if you gave the stock directly to the charity.

Make a Tax-Free Transfer From Your IRA

People who are age 70½ and older can give up to $100,000 per year tax-free from their IRA to charity, a procedure called a qualified charitable distribution or QCD. The gift counts as their required minimum distribution but isn’t included in their adjusted gross income. (Even though the SECURE Act, another recent tax law, increased the age to start taking RMDs from 70½ to 72, you can still make a qualified charitable distribution any time after you turn age 70½.)

This is usually a great strategy for people who have to take RMDs and would like to give money to charity – they can help the charity and not have to pay taxes on the money they have to withdraw from their IRA. But because of the CARES Act, people are not required to take RMDs in 2020. However, you may still be able to benefit from making a QCD this year. “Some people who have been doing the QCD have been supporting a couple of charities every year, and they’re not going to stop, especially during this time of need,” says Yuen. The tax-free transfer takes money out of your IRA, which can help reduce future RMDs. “It’s great planning,” she says.

To keep the money out of your AGI, it must be transferred directly from your IRA to the charity – you can’t withdraw it first. Ask your IRA administrator about the procedure, and let the charity know the money is coming. You have to give this money directly to a charity; it can’t go to a donor-advised fund.

Make an Extra Effort to Research Charities This Year

Scam artists have been out in full force to take advantage of the coronavirus pandemic. It’s even more important now to check out charities before you give money, especially if they contact you first. You can look up charities at sites such as Charity Navigator and the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. Local community foundations are also a great resource for aid focused on your community – see the Community Foundation Locator for links. If you have a donor-advised fund, you may have access to additional research tools, such as GuideStar.

Schwab Charitable can help its donors vet the charities and also provides lists of selected charities that focus on timely issues, such as COVID-19 relief and social justice. “We’re trying to develop short lists to help people narrow the charities down to ones we know are valid and doing good work,” says Laughton.

Credit given to US News & World Report published Aug 21, 2020 by Kimberly Lankford.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

–until next week.

Where’s My Refund? July 29, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : 2019 Taxes, tax changes, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

                     

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, IRS live phone assistance is extremely limited. People are encouraged to first check the Where’s My Refund? tool on the IRS website and the IRS2Go app. Taxpayers can also review the IRS Services Guide (PDF) which links to additional IRS online services.

The IRS issues 9 out of 10 refunds in less than 21 days, and the fastest way to get a refund is to use IRS e-file and direct deposit. Taxpayers should also know they can have their refunds divided into up to three separate accounts.

Please note: Ordering a tax transcript will not speed delivery of tax refunds nor does the posting of a tax transcript to a taxpayer’s account determine the timing of a refund delivery. Calls to request transcripts for this purpose are unnecessary. Transcripts are available online and by mail at Get Transcript.

A few necessary items

To use the “Where’s My Refund” tool, taxpayers will need to enter their Social Security number, tax filing status (single, married, head of household) and exact amount of the tax refund claimed on the return.

Taxpayers who file electronically can check “Where’s My Refund” within 24 hours after they receive their e-file acceptance notification. The tool can tell taxpayers when their tax return has been received, when the refund is approved and the date the refund is to be issued.

Some refunds may take longer

While the IRS continues to process electronic and paper tax returns, issue refunds, and accept payments, there are delays in processing paper tax returns due to limited staffing. If a taxpayer filed a paper tax return, the return will be processed in the order in which it was received. Do not file a second tax return or call the IRS.

Many different factors can affect the timing of a refund. In some cases, a tax return may require additional review. It is also important to consider the time it takes for a financial institution to post the refund to an account or for a refund check to be delivered by mail.

Taxpayers who owe

The IRS encourages taxpayers who owe to do a Paycheck Checkup every year to ensure enough tax is withheld from their pay to avoid an unexpected tax bill.

This week’s article – From IRS.gov – Click Here

– Tammy

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

– until next week.

Two New Employer Tax Credits July 15, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Business Consulting, COVID, COVID-19, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

July 15, 2020                         

Many businesses that have been severely impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19) will qualify for two new employer tax credits – the Credit for Sick and Family Leave and the Employee Retention Credit.

Sick and Family Leave – Credit for Sick and Family Leave

An employee who is unable to work (including telework) because of Coronavirus quarantine or self-quarantine or has Coronavirus symptoms and is seeking a medical diagnosis, is entitled to paid sick leave for up to ten days (up to 80 hours) at the employee’s regular rate of pay, or, if higher, the Federal minimum wage or any applicable State or local minimum wage, up to $511 per day, but no more than $5,110 in total.

Caring for someone with Coronavirus

An employee who is unable to work due to caring for someone with Coronavirus, or caring for a child because the child’s school or place of care is closed, or the paid child care provider is unavailable due to the Coronavirus, is entitled to paid sick leave for up to two weeks (up to 80 hours) at two-thirds the employee’s regular rate of pay or, if higher, the Federal minimum wage or any applicable State or local minimum wage, up to $200 per day, but no more than $2,000 in total.

Care for children due to daycare or school closure

An employee who is unable to work because of a need to care for a child whose school or place of care is closed or whose child care provider is unavailable due to the Coronavirus, is also entitled to paid family and medical leave equal to two-thirds of the employee’s regular pay, up to $200 per day and $10,000 in total. Up to ten weeks of qualifying leave can be counted towards the family leave credit.

Credit for eligible employers

Eligible employers are entitled to receive a credit in the full amount of the required sick leave and family leave, plus related health plan expenses and the employer’s share of Medicare tax on the leave, for the period of April 1, 2020, through December 31, 2020.  The refundable credit is applied against certain employment taxes on wages paid to all employees. Eligible employers can reduce federal employment tax deposits in anticipation of the credit.  They can also request an advance of the paid sick and family leave credits for any amounts not covered by the reduction in deposits. The advanced payments will be issued by paper check to employers.

Employee Retention Credit

Eligible employers can claim the employee retention credit, a refundable tax credit equal to 50 percent of up to $10,000 in qualified wages (including health plan expenses), paid after March 12, 2020 and before January 1, 2021.  Eligible employers are those businesses with operations that have been partially or fully suspended due to governmental orders due to COVID-19, or businesses that have a significant decline in gross receipts compared to 2019.

The refundable credit is capped at $5,000 per employee and applies against certain employment taxes on wages paid to all employees.  Eligible employers can reduce federal employment tax deposits in anticipation of the credit.  They can also request an advance of the employee retention credit for any amounts not covered by the reduction in deposits. The advanced payments will be issued by paper check to employers.

Need more information on how to apply? Click here

This week’s article – From IRS.gov – Click Here

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

Correction/Update to an earlier Tax Tip of the Week regarding municipal income taxes.  A local Income Tax Administrator was kind enough to send the below information to us as follows:

“H.B. 197 sets aside 718.011 of the Ohio Revised Code, stating:

…during the period of the emergency declared by Executive Order 2020-01D, issued on March 9, 2020, and for thirty days after the conclusion of that period, any day on which an employee performs personal services at a location, including the employee’s home, to which the employee is required to report for employment duties because of the declaration shall be deemed to be a day performing personal services at the employee’s principal place of work.

That said, employees who were sent home to work during the pandemic are still considered to be working at their principal place of work and not their city of residence.  That’s why employees should not have had a change in their municipal withholding from pre-pandemic times.  There are those that question the constitutionality of the executive order, so I’m sure that the State or others will address this at a later time.  Unfortunately, due to ORC Section 718, municipalities cannot pass legislation to override H.B. 197 or any section of 718.”

– until next week.

-Mark

Working Remotely? Watch Out for Unintended Tax Consequences! July 1, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : COVID, COVID-19, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

  Typically, you are taxed by the location of your physical presence (this is changing now to some degree to better deal with the complexities of the internet).  For example, Ohio cities tax you first where you work and then next where you live.  That is to say that you won’t owe any city tax for your residence city if your workplace is located in a city whose tax rate is equal to or higher than the city where you live.  This is true only if your resident city allows a full tax credit for the city taxes paid where you work and its tax rate is equal to or less than your work city.  Not too long ago, almost all cities allowed a full credit for the tax paid to the city where you are employed.  But this full tax offset is becoming more of a rarity the last few years as city budgets continue to become more and more strained. These deficit situations for state and local governments won’t become any better with the current pandemic placing even greater demands on city finances. Take a look at this roster management system many businesses are using to manage their finances.

    For all intents and purposes, your state income tax model differs little from that of the cities.  It is not unlikely to find yourself double taxed by cities AND states.

    Now having attempted to make a long story short and leaving out the numerous tax exceptions for the general tax rules for cities and states as mentioned above; and, all the while assuming you have a good handle on how your state and local taxes should currently be filed, let’s throw you a curve ball.  Let’s presume you are now working from home.  And, your home is in a different city or even a different state than where you work.  What if you are working half the week at home and the rest of the week at work?  All of a sudden, a tax nightmare has developed.  

    I wish I had the silver bullet to answer my own questions.  Perhaps, the cities and states will pass legislation to overcome these added complexities resulting from the pandemic.  But I doubt it.  In the meantime, we better become accustomed to even more tax correspondence from cities and states.  None of them are going to roll-over in their efforts to collect all the monies that they can.  It is always a mystery to me why they would spend megabucks and create huge amounts of ill will in the community all in an effort to collect a nominal amount of taxes.  But some things never change.

This week’s Author – Mark Bradstreet

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

– until next week.

Your Age-by-Age Checklist to Prepare for Retirement Conversations June 24, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Retirement, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

June 24, 2020

The question isn’t at what age I want to retire, it’s at what income.                      -George Foreman

Never have times been so interesting. Never has change occurred so fast.  We all know that time moves faster as we grow older.  However, it may not make sense to bend over backwards in an effort to fund your retirement at a young age.  But neither may it be ignored completely either.  
                           -Mark Bradstreet

What should you and your loved ones be doing to prepare for a retirement when and how you want? While the answer partially depends on whether your own personal finish line is just around the corner or decades away, there’s one thing that everyone should be doing, no matter your age: talking.

It’s important to have conversations about retirement planning early and often, but not everyone knows what to talk about or how to get started. These age-based guidelines can serve as discussion points with your loved ones to make sure you’re on track for the retirement you want.

Preparing for retirement in your 30’s

• Don’t let student loans prevent you from saving for retirement. It’s usually a mistake to think that student loan debt should be fully paid off before putting aside money for retirement. Your retirement savings need time to grow so you can achieve your goals, and investing early will pay off in the long run — even if you can’t save as much as you’d like.  The right balance will likely include payments toward both goals, with the exact amounts depending on factors like interest rates and expected returns. 

• Make sure you’re maxing out your company’s 401(k) matching contributions. Employers often match up to a certain amount of your contributions; it’s essentially free money that you could be taking advantage of! 

• Don’t leave your job without taking vesting into consideration. Many companies tie their retirement contributions to a requirement that you stay with the company for a minimum amount of time, known as the vesting period. If you leave before the allotted period of time, be aware of the financial repercussions. 

• Revisit your 401(k) contributions each time you get a raise or promotion. If you’ve set up automatic contributions, it’s important that you don’t fall into the trap of sticking to those levels indefinitely.

• Understand the power of compounding returns. The earlier you begin investing, the more time your money will have to grow. Don’t delay. 

Preparing for your retirement in your 40’s

• Prioritize paying down your high-interest debt. Whether you have credit card debt, a car loan or a home mortgage, paying interest can eat away at your ability to save money for retirement. Prioritize your highest interest debt first and work your way down until you’re debt free. 

• Don’t fall behind. Your 40’s can be a stressful time financially. Many people in today’s “sandwich generation” are squeezed by the needs of children getting ready for college and elderly parents with dwindling reserves. Try to at least keep pace with your previous level of retirement savings. 

• Start running the numbers. Making some quick calculations can help show you where different savings scenarios are likely to lead you. If you’re not sure where to start, try Lincoln Financial’s retirement calculators.

• Talk to a financial advisor to make sure you’re on the right track. “Meeting with a financial advisor can help alleviate some of the stress surrounding retirement by helping savers create a plan,” said Jamie Ohl, Executive Vice President, President, Retirement Plan Services, Lincoln Financial Group. “People who have a plan are more confident and better prepared for retirement.”

Preparing for retirement in your 50’s

• Don’t let your spending get out of control. People often find that their disposable income increases in their 50’s as they become empty nesters and their salaries peak. Instead of letting your spending increase in tandem, increase the amount of money you put into your retirement accounts and practice frugality — getting accustomed to a more luxurious lifestyle can make it more difficult to retire.

• Ask your employer about catch-up contributions. Most companies allow workers who are age 50 and above to contribute an extra $6,000 annually to their 401(k) on top of the regular contribution limits. 

• Don’t count on an “average” lifespan. “People are living longer than ever before, and they may not factor that into their retirement planning,” said Will Fuller, Executive Vice President, President, Annuities, Lincoln Financial Distributors and Lincoln Financial Network. “That makes outliving your savings a real concern for the millions of households in America that do not have any kind of income protection in place.”

• Consider purchasing an annuity to protect against uncertainty. Annuities provide you with a guaranteed income for life, safeguarding you against longevity risk and stock market risk. 

• Get your financial advisor to align with your expected retirement age. You may have an ideal retirement age in mind, but your financial advisor is best situated to help you determine whether it’s realistic and what you need to do to get there. 

Tips like these will make sure that you’re heading in the right direction, but there’s no substitute for talking through your own personal circumstances with human financial advisors every step of the way. You’re never too young or too old to get help from a professional — and if you’ve already followed the steps above, it will be easy for them to take you across the finish line.

Today’s author – Mark Bradstreet

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

– until next week.

Unraveling Conflicting Tax Rules for Active vs. Passive Income February 26, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : 2019 Taxes, Business consulting, General, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

February 26, 2020

Few topics in the office cause more arguments than the tax definition of active versus passive.  The answer affects your income taxes vastly more than one would ever guess.  And, not in just one area of tax but often involving a multitude of seemingly unrelated areas.  At times, both parties in our office scuffles will have written evidence to support each of their opposing views.  Taxes have many shades of gray.

                            -Mark Bradstreet

It is commonly accepted wisdom that tax rules are complicated. This belief is well supported by the conflicting tax rules that apply to business owners, depending on their participation in the business. Let me try to make some sense of these conflicting rules.

Overview

Business owners may be active in their business. This means they are hands-on and are involved in day-to-day activities. Other business owners may be mere investors, adding their capital but not their labor. The following are various rules that take into account whether owners do or do not work in their businesses.

Qualified business income deduction

The 20% deduction for qualified business income (QBI) applies to owners of pass-through entities. There is no requirement that they do or do not participate in the daily operations of the business in order to claim this personal deduction based on their share of business income. If they participate (e.g., they are an S corporation shareholder who receives a salary), this factors into the QBI determination. For example, salary to an S corporation shareholder is not an item allowed in determining QBI, but the salary does count as wages for purposes of W-2 wages used in the formula for the QBI deduction.

Net investment income deduction

The 3.8% net investment income (NII) tax depends entirely on an owner’s participation in the business. Only income from a business in which the taxpayer does not materially participate is treated as investment income and potentially subject to the NII tax. The determination of material participation is made using the passive activity loss rules (below).

Passive activity loss rules

Under the passive activity loss rules, losses from a business activity in which an owner does not materially participate, and has no passive income, are not currently deductible (sorry for the double negative but it’s the best way to explain this limitation). Suspended losses can be carried forward and used to offset passive activity income in the future.

The determination of whether an owner is passive or active is based on 7 tests. An owner is treated as materially participating (i.e., active) and is exempt from the passive activity loss rules if he or she meets any of these tests:

1.    The owner participated in the activity for more than 500 hours.
2.    The owner’s participation was substantially all the participation in the activity of all individuals for the tax year, including the participation of individuals who didn’t own any interest in the activity.
3.    The owner participated in the activity for more than 100 hours during the tax year, and he or she participated at least as much as any other individual (including individuals who didn’t own any interest in the activity) for the year.
4.    The activity is a significant participation activity, and the owner participated in all significant participation activities for more than 500 hours (i.e., participation for more than 100 hours during the year and in which the owner didn’t materially participate under any of the material participation tests).
5.    The owner materially participated in the activity (other than by meeting this fifth test) for any 5 (whether or not consecutive) of the 10 immediately preceding tax years.
6.    The activity is a personal service activity in which you materially participated for any 3 (whether or not consecutive) preceding tax years. An activity is a personal service activity if it involves the performance of personal services in the fields of health (including veterinary services), law, engineering, architecture, accounting, actuarial science, performing arts, consulting, or any other trade or business in which capital isn’t a material income-producing factor.
7.    Based on all the facts and circumstances, the owner participated in the activity on a regular, continuous, and substantial basis during the year.

Note: When it comes to rental real estate activities and the passive activity loss rules, an owner’s participation doesn’t entitle him or her to claim losses. Owners of rental real estate activities can escape the passive activity loss rules only by demonstrating that they are real estate professionals (part of the definition of a real estate professional is based on material participation).

Self-employment tax

Sole proprietors pay self-employment tax on their net self-employment income. This is so whether they run their business or are totally in the background, relying on a full-time manager to handle the business.

General partners are subject to self-employment tax on their distributive share of self-employment income, plus any guaranteed payments. In contrast, limited partners are exempt from self-employment tax (other than for any guaranteed payments they receive for personal services rendered for the partnership).

Members in limited liability companies may or may not be subject to self-employment tax. There is no firm IRS guidance on this matter. However, tax professionals have argued that where members are mere investors (i.e., they act like limited partners), they should be treated like limited partners who are exempt from self-employment tax on their distributive shares.

Bottom line

Whether you sweat each day in your endeavors or are an investor who watches the books determines the tax rules that apply to you. Discuss your status with your CPA or other tax advisor.

Credit given to:Barbara Weltman

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

Today’s author – Mark Bradstreet

–until next week.

Energy Tax Credit: Which Home Improvements Qualify? February 19, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : 2019 Taxes, Taxes, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Updated for Tax Year 2019

Taxpayers who upgrade their homes to make use of renewable energy may be eligible for a tax credit to offset some of the costs. Through the 2019 tax year, the federal government offers the Non-business Energy Property Credit. The renewable energy tax credits are good through 2019 and then are reduced each year through the end of 2021. Claim the credits by filing Form 5695 with your tax return.

Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit

Equipment that qualifies for the Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit includes solar, wind, geothermal and fuel-cell technology:

Renewable energy tax credit details

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, you can claim the Residential Energy Efficiency Property Credit for solar, wind, and geothermal equipment in both your principal residence and a second home. But fuel-cell equipment qualifies only if installed in your principal residence.

Non-business Energy Property Tax Credit
(Extended through December 31, 2019)

Equipment and materials can qualify for the Non-business Energy Property Credit only if they meet the standards set by the Department of Energy. The manufacturer can tell you whether a particular item meets those standards.

For this credit, the IRS distinguishes between two kinds of upgrades.

The first is “qualified energy efficiency improvements,” and it includes:

The second category is “residential energy property costs.” It includes:

Details of the Non-business Energy Property Credit
(Extended through December 31, 2019)

You can claim a tax credit for 10% of the cost of qualified energy efficiency improvements and 100% of residential energy property costs. This credit is worth a maximum of $500 for all years combined, from 2006 to its expiration.  Of that combined $500 limit;

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

–until next week.