jump to navigation

What You Need to File your Taxes January 20, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Deductions, Depreciation options, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Our job includes minimizing your income tax liability both in the short-term and long-term. Our ability to do so is closely tied to the accuracy and completeness of the information given us. Our client tax organizer and checklist are designed to help you report your income and deductions to us.  When your tax organizer and checklist are not completed, we may not know what we don’t know. Always, a good idea to call, mail, text or email any new events or questions during the year so we may either give you immediate suggestions and/or be on the alert during your tax preparation.

The following article by the Taxslayer Blog Team is written from the 30,000 feet view. Our tax organizer and checklist are more comprehensive. But the article will give you a starting point for gathering your tax information. 
                                                                                                                                                                                                -Mark Bradstreet

Tax Prep Checklist: Everything You Need to File Your Taxes

If you’d rather do something – anything – other than filing your taxes, remember that the sooner you file, the sooner you’ll get your refund. To make the e-filing process quicker, gather your forms and documents before you begin. Below is a checklist of the basic forms and records you’ll need to make slaying your taxes a cinch. 

Personal Information 

Income and Investment Information 

Self-Employment and Business Records (where applicable) 

Medical Expense Receipts and Records 

Charitable Donations 

Other Homeownership Info 

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

Business Planning for a Pandemic January 13, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Not sure how to even begin this article. What I believe today I can practically guarantee you will change tomorrow. We have made some good decisions. We have made some bad decisions. We have also been overly reactive at times. But I suppose most of our decisions were sound based upon the information available at that moment. Turns out that a lot of that information was false or speculative. But who knew?

Many of our clients are prospering in this pandemic. Several clients are having a record year. A few clients through absolutely no fault of their own are suffering. A vaccine is on the horizon. I hope that that is a game changer. 

The following article is how some CFOs across the country are dealing with the pandemic. I hope it is of value.

            -Mark Bradstreet

Three experienced finance leaders share what they have learned and what they are doing to deal with turmoil and uncertainty.

The ongoing economic crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic is forcing businesses to re-evaluate their spending, staffing, and structure. Company leaders are looking to their CFOs and management accountants to advise them on how to navigate the unique financial challenges they face as a result of the outbreak.

Three financial leaders with experience guiding companies through times of economic turmoil, including the 2008 recession, say there are specific ways CFOs and other leaders can handle the coronavirus crisis moving forward.

On matters from communications to cash flow, the experts offered advice about how to react quickly, stay calm, focus on what’s important, and be willing to let some things go. The advice is especially important for leaders experiencing their first financial disaster.

Save more cash

“Cash is king. … Never, ever in my career, and I’ve been doing this for 35 years, has that statement been more true than right now,” said Brenda Morris CPA (inactive), CGMA, who lives in the Seattle area and is a partner with CSuite Financial Partners based in Manhattan Beach, Calif. She is on the Association’s Americas Regional Advisory Panel, and also serves as a consultant and coach for several public and private businesses, including Boot Barn and Duluth Trading Company.

Morris works with Fortune 500 and Fortune 1000 companies, some of which “have a lot of cash on the balance sheet”, she said, but fixed costs such as payroll and building rent and mortgages can add up quickly, eating into those reserves.

“It’s pretty amazing how fast companies can burn through what seemed to be a very adequate balance sheet,” she said.

Morris advises companies to create a robust cash sensitivity model and run as many scenarios as possible to see how much money would be needed in a crisis. Some of the models might include the financial impacts of furloughing employees, figuring out ways to quickly drive up sales, getting more aggressive in negotiations, or finding more investors.

“You step it up and figure it out,” Morris said. “React quickly. Don’t languish too long in making some of the hard decisions. Those are the [companies] that’ll make it through.”

Bob Sannerud, CPA, CGMA, the CFO of the air medical company Life Link III, and chair of the Association’s Americas Regional Advisory Panel, knows the stress of not having enough cash on hand. He joined Life Link III during the 2008 financial crisis and found the business “in dire straits.”

“We had four days of cash when I came on board and came in to turn around the company,” he said.

Since then, he has done some financial engineering to correct the company’s cash flow, working with leaders of various departments to discuss business challenges and priorities. Today, the company is stronger financially and will likely survive the uncertainty of the coronavirus outbreak, Sannerud said.

“If it goes on for a year, well, all bets are off. But in the short term, we feel we can handle it,” he said.

Create a disaster recovery plan

Companies should create disaster recovery plans and select a task force of leaders to discuss the what-ifs, Morris said. If possible, they should test out their plans, but “it’s rare for companies to actually do exercises or dry runs. [Some] companies don’t have the bandwidth to run catastrophic scenarios as exercises and just sort of see what happens,” she said. “That’s an investment.”

Her work with various businesses and boards has allowed her to see how different companies are responding to the coronavirus crisis. That insight has convinced her how important it is for companies to have a team of people investigating what is working and what isn’t before, during, and after an economic crisis.

She is leading a coronavirus crisis response team for one of the boards she sits on and said her goal is to limit distractions for company leaders so they can focus on the priority areas of the business.

Having a disaster plan is essential in the broadcast company says Ralph Bender, CPA, CGMA, who serves as CFO.

“We’ve been through floods, hurricanes, [and] now this,” he said, noting the financial and logistical challenges the media industry is facing during the coronavirus outbreak. Bender is the CFO of Manship Media, a family-owned broadcasting group that runs TV stations in Baton Rouge, La., and the Rio Grande Valley in Texas.

“Things are going to be dire. … But most people will find ways to get through this,” Bender said. “It’s important to have a disaster recovery plan … to not just have something on paper, but to have tried things out.”

Build trust

Life Link III transports more than 2,000 patients a year by helicopter and airplane ambulance in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Some of the company’s first responders have been on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, leading them to ask questions about their own personal safety when dealing with sick patients, what protective gear they will have access to, and whether their jobs are in jeopardy, according to Sannerud.

The company saw a decreased flight volume in March, partly due to weather but mostly due to the coronavirus outbreak, he said, but there are no plans to let go of staff or close any of the eight bases where they are located.

“For us, the challenge has been really making sure our people are being taken care of and making sure that they’re assured that we’ve got their best interests in mind as we go forward,” Sannerud said.

Providing employees, stakeholders, and customers with timely, transparent communication is vital during tumultuous times like these, Sannerud said. Companies need to establish a central communications hub and make sure the various leaders are speaking with one voice.

“It helps build the trust, because we are able to clearly state what we know, what we don’t know, and what we’re doing,” Sannerud said, noting that communication shouldn’t be too negative or overly optimistic.

Life Link III leaders decided to reach out to employees’ family members as well to assure them that the company cares and to acknowledge the stress they are under. That kind of personal touch can help build credibility and calm any fears spouses or other family members might have, Sannerud said.

Be prepared to pivot, but don’t panic

When Bender and his company, Manship Media, first realized how big the coronavirus outbreak might be, they quickly pivoted to a new plan to prepare for the possibility that staff might need to work from home.

Using some of the company’s cash reserves, they bought 30 Google Chromebooks for employees to take home. The decision paid off as businesses across the country, including news media, moved to more remote work in an effort to stop the coronavirus from spreading.

“It was under a $7,500 investment, and look at the rewards,” Bender said. “People are working. But more importantly, people are working safely.”

CFOs and other financial leaders need to think of themselves as chief strategists and not just tell company leaders not to spend any money during a crisis, according to Bender.

“Be calm and do not panic,” he said. “You calmly look into details. What’s essential? What’s not?”

Sannerud agreed and said it’s crucial that financial leaders “be prepared to pivot.”

“Just because you made a plan yesterday doesn’t mean it’s going to hold water today,” he said. “Be adaptable, and be willing to make a change based on information.”

The best way to get that information is to talk with employees on the front lines of the work, Sannerud said. Take time to ask them what they are seeing and experiencing and use that information to guide your business plans during times of VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity), according to Sannerud.

Focus on what’s important and what you can control, and forget the rest

Sannerud is used to forecasting long-term operations for Life Link III, but the coronavirus pandemic has made budgeting nearly impossible with the uncertainty his business and others are facing.

“I can’t forecast operations out much more than the next three months, and even that’s not exactly crystal-clear,” he said.

Instead, Sannerud has tried to focus on the limited things he can control, such as providing calm and steady leadership during a crisis, being transparent with employees about the state of the business, and keeping a set routine even while working from home.

He is usually in the office by 6 a.m., so he decided to keep the same hours while working from home. When he is finished with work, he makes sure to exercise, usually by biking or taking a walk with his wife. He also tries to find humor in each day, limit the amount of media he consumes, and focus on his mental and physical health.

“Those are all things you can control,” he said.

Morris’s biggest piece of advice for financial leaders is to determine what’s most important to your business and not get distracted by outside noise. Ask yourself: What is the biggest and most impactful issue facing the company?

“Have a course of action that keeps you focused each day,” she said.

Bender suggested focusing on what your company does well and where it can have the most success. For his company, that meant letting go of a newspaper and radio stations it owned several years ago and focusing on its two TV stations. Downsizing the company caused it to be more profitable and workable, he said.

Now, as he and his company navigate the coronavirus pandemic, they are again looking at what their focus should be to get through this crisis. This time, it has less to do with the bottom line.

“As CPAs, we hate to say, ‘Who cares about the bottom line?’ But right now, that’s not the most important thing to us,” Bender said. “There’s an opportunity for companies to show their employees that their values are not just about a bottom line, but they’re about welfare of employees, stockholders, and customers.”

Bender said he understands some CFOs and leaders don’t have the same financial advantages as his company. To them, he has this message: “Stay focused. Stay safe. For God’s sake, keep a sense of humor. This has all of us on edge.”

Credit given to: Kelly Hinchcliffe is a freelance writer based in North Carolina. Published on June 15, 2020.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

A Checklist of Business Deductions January 6, 2021

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Deductions, Depreciation options, General, Section 168, Section 179, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes , add a comment

Sara Sugar has created a list of small business deductions as shown below.  It is a great list to scan through and see if you have been overlooking any tax deductions.  Always fine to call us with any questions or comments you may have.

                                 -Mark Bradstreet

THE ULTIMATE LIST OF SMALL BUSINESS TAX DEDUCTIONS

Every small business owner wants to save money — and small business tax deductions are one way to do exactly that.

This list of 37 deductions will take you from “Ugh, taxes” to “Taxes? I got this.”

1. Vehicle Expenses.
Keep records during the year to prove the use of your car, truck or van, for business, especially if you also use the vehicle for personal reasons. When it’s time to pay taxes, you can choose to deduct your actual expenses (including gasoline, maintenance, parking, and tolls), or you can take the more straightforward route of using the IRS standard mileage rate — 58 cents per mile in 2019.

Whether you’re running errands in your own car or making deliveries in your bakery van, track the mileage and run some numbers to see which method gives you the higher deduction. If you drive a lot of miles each year, it makes more sense to use the standard mileage deduction when filing taxes. However, if you have an older vehicle that regularly needs maintenance, or isn’t fuel efficient, you might be able to get a larger deduction by using your actual expenses vs. the IRS mileage rate.

Either way, we all know that gas, repairs, parking, and mileage add up, so taking advantage of the standard mileage rate, or deducting your actual expenses, is a no-brainer way to put some of that money back in your pocket. Just make sure you keep records diligently to avoid mixing personal expenses with business ones.

2. Home Office.
Do you run part of your small business out of your home, maybe doing the books in the evenings after you’ve parked your food truck for the night? Or perhaps you run an entirely home-based business. For many self-employed individuals and sole proprietors, it’s pretty standard to have a space at home that’s devoted to your work. The key here is the word devoted. Sometimes doing work on at the kitchen table while your kids do their homework doesn’t count as a home office. You must have a specific room that’s dedicated to being your office in order for it to be tax deductible.

Calculating the size of your deduction is primarily related to the amount of your home that’s used as an office. For example:

Total square footage of your home / divided into square footage used as an office = the percentage of direct and indirect expenses (rent, utilities, insurance, repairs, etc.) that can be deducted.

We highly recommend that you read the IRS’ literature on this particular tax deduction, and/or speak with a tax professional before filing taxes with this deduction. It’s one of the more complicated ones available to small business owners, and there have been numerous court cases and controversies over the years. When dealing with the potential for a costly audit, it pays to be safe by consulting a professional tax preparer rather than sorry.

3. Bonus Depreciation.
If you buy new capital equipment, such as a new oven for your pizzeria, you get a depreciation tax break that lets you deduct 100 percent of your costs upon purchase. Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, 100% bonus depreciation only pertains to equipment purchased and placed in use between September 27, 2017 and January 1, 2023 — something to keep in mind as you plan for new equipment purchases in the next few years.

It’s important to note that according to the IRS, the asset you purchase must meet the following three requirements:

A few things that don’t count as assets include:

4. Professional Services.
As a small business, you don’t have in-house accountants or attorneys, but that doesn’t mean you can’t deduct their services. If you hire a consultant to help you grow your gift shop’s outreach, the fees and overall expense you pay for those services are deductible. Make sure the fees you’re paying are reasonable and necessary for the deduction to count by checking with the appropriate IRS publication or a tax professional. But you’d do that anyway, wouldn’t you?

5. Salaries and Wages.
If you’re a sole proprietor or your company is an LLC, you may not be able to deduct draws and income that you take from your business. However, salaries and wages that you pay to those faithful part-time and full-time employees behind the cash register are indeed deductible.

However, this doesn’t just stop at standard salaries and wages. Other payments like bonuses, meals, lodging, per diem, allowances, and some employer-paid taxes are also deductible. You can even deduct the cost of payroll software and systems in many cases.

6. Work Opportunity Tax Credit.
Have you hired military veterans or other long-term unemployed people to work behind your counter? If so, you may be eligible to take advantage of the Work Opportunity Tax Credit of 40 percent of your first $6,000 in wages.

7. Office Supplies and Expenses.
If you’re running a frozen yogurt shop, when you hear the word “supplies,” you probably think of plastic spoons. However, even if your business doesn’t have a traditional office, you can still deduct conventional business supplies and office expenses, as long as they are used within the year they’re purchased, so set up a file for your receipts. Many times, you can also deduct the cost of postage, shipping, and delivery services so if mail-order is a part of your business, be sure to keep track of this cost.

8. Client and Employee Entertainment.
Yes, you can take small business deductions for schmoozing your clients, as long as you do indeed discuss business with them, and as long as the entertainment occurs in a business setting and for business purposes. In some cases, you can’t deduct the full amount of your entertainment expenses, but every bit helps.

Here are some tips to guide when and what you can deduct:

(Please note:  the TCJA affected Meals & Entertainment deductions beginning in 2018.)

9. Freelance/Independent Contractor Labor.
If you bring in independent contractors to keep your checkout lines moving during the holidays or to create new marketing materials for your shop, you can deduct your costs. Make sure you issue Form 1099-NEC to anyone who earned $600 or more from you during the tax year.

10. Furniture and Equipment.
Did you buy new chairs for your eat-in bakery or new juicing blenders for your juice bar this year? You have a choice regarding how you take your small business tax deduction for furniture and equipment. You can either deduct the entire cost for the tax year in which it was purchased, or you can depreciate the purchases over a seven-year period. The IRS has specific regulations that govern your choices here, so make sure you’re following the rules and make the right choice between depreciation and full deduction.

11. Employee Benefits.
The benefits that businesses like yours offer to employees do more than attract high-quality talent to your team. They also have tax benefits. Keep track of all contributions you make to your employees’ health plans, life insurance, pensions, profit-sharing, education reimbursement programs, and more. They’re all tax-deductible.

12. Computer Software.
You can now deduct the full cost of business software as a small business tax deduction, rather than depreciating it as in years past. This includes your POS software and all software you use to run your business.

13. Rent on Your Business Location.
You undoubtedly pay rent for your pet store or candy shop. Make sure you deduct it.

14. Startup Expenses.
If you’ve just opened your gift shop or convenience store, you may be able to deduct up to $5,000 in start-up costs and expenses that you incurred before you opened your doors for business. These can include marketing and advertising costs, travel, and employee pay for training.

15. Utilities.
Don’t miss the small business tax deductions for your electricity, mobile phone, and other utilities. If you use the home office deduction, your landline must be dedicated to your business to be deductible.

16. Travel Expenses.
Most industries offer some form of trade show or professional event where similar businesses can gather to discuss trends, meet with vendors, sell goods and discuss industry news. If you’re traveling to a trade show, you can take a small business deduction for all your expenses, including airfare, hotels, meals on the road, automobile expenses – whether you use the IRS standard mileage rate or actual expenses – and even tipping your cab driver.

There are also deductions for expenses that might not immediately come to mind, like:

In order for your trip to qualify for a travel deduction, it must meet the following criteria:

As with all deductions, it’s imperative that you keep receipts and records of all business travel expenses you plan to deduct in case of an audit.

17. Taxes.
Deducting taxes is a little tricky because the small business deduction depends on the type of tax. Deduct all licenses and fees, as well as taxes on any real estate your business owns. You should also deduct all sales taxes that you have collected from the customers at your deli. You can also deduct your share of the FICA, FUTA, and state unemployment taxes that you pay on behalf of your employees.

18. Commissions.
If you have salespeople working on commission, those payments are tax-deductible. You can also take a small business tax deduction for third-party commissions, such as those you might pay in an affiliate marketing set-up.

19. Machinery and Equipment Rental.
Sometimes renting equipment for your coffee shop or concession stand is beneficial to your bottom line, since you can deduct these business expenses in the year they occur with no depreciation.

20. Interest on Loans.
If you take out a business line of credit, the interest you pay is completely deductible as a small business tax deduction. If you take out a personal loan and funnel some of the proceeds into your business, however, the tax application becomes somewhat more complicated.

21. Inventory for Service-Based Businesses.
Inventory normally isn’t deductible. However, if you’re a service-based business and you use the cash method of accounting (instead of the standard accrual method typically used for businesses with inventory), you can treat some inventory as supplies and deduct them. For instance, if you’re an ice cream shop but you sell your special hot fudge sauce as a product, your inventory may be deductible. Consult a tax professional to see if you qualify.

22. Bad Debts.
Did you advance money to an employee or vendor, and then not receive repayment or the goods or services you thought you were contracting for? If so, you may be able to treat this bad business debt as a small business deduction.

23. Employee Education and Child Care Assistance.
If you go above and beyond with your employee benefits, you may be able to take small business tax deductions for education assistance and dependent care assistance. The IRS is pretty much rewarding you here for being a great employer. So, take a bow, and the deduction.

24. Mortgage Interest.
If your business owns its own building, even if it’s just a hot dog stand, you can deduct all your mortgage interest.

25. Bank Charges.
Don’t forget to deduct the fees your bank charges you for your business accounts. Even any ATM fees are deductible.

26. Disaster and Theft Losses.
If your business is unfortunate enough to suffer theft or to be the victim of a natural disaster during the year, you may be able to turn any losses that your insurance company didn’t reimburse into a small business tax deduction.

27. Carryovers From Previous Years.
Some small business tax deductions carry over from year to year. For instance, if you had a capital loss in a previous year, you may be able to take it in the current year. Specifics often change from year to year, so make sure you’re up to date on the latest IRS regulations.

28. Insurance.
The insurance premiums you pay for coverage on your business is all tax-deductible. To qualify, your insurance must provide coverage that is “ordinary and necessary.”

This could include coverage for:

There are a few insurance types that you can’t deduct, the most common being life insurance. If you’re not sure whether you can deduct a certain type of insurance, and that deduction is an important factor in your decision, please speak with a tax professional first and save yourself any unnecessary expenses.

29. Home Renovations and Insurance.
Did you take a deduction for a home office already? If so, business expenses related to any renovations to that part of your home are also deductible, and so is the percentage of your homeowner’s insurance that covers that part of your home. Remember, all small business deductions related to home offices only apply if you use part of your home exclusively for business.

30. Tools.
The IRS distinguishes between tools and equipment. While you may have to capitalize on equipment rather than deducting it in one year, you can deduct tools that aren’t expensive or that have a life of only a year or less. And for the IRS, “tools” doesn’t just refer to hammers or screwdrivers; your spatulas and cookie sheets are tools as well.

31. Unpaid Goods.
If your business produces goods rather than providing a service, you can deduct the cost of any goods that you haven’t been paid for yet.

32. Education.
Did you attend any seminars, workshops or classes in the past year that were designed to help you improve your job skills? Your work-related educational expenses may be deductible, especially if they’re required to keep up or renew a professional license. Remember, they have to be work-related. If you own a bar or cafe, you won’t be able to deduct skiing lessons.

33. Advertising and Marketing.
You already know that providing amazing goods and services isn’t enough to make your business succeed. You also need to advertise so your potential customers can find you. Advertising and marketing dollars can add up fast, but fortunately, they are all tax-deductible.

This is great news since advertising and marketing are often of the biggest business expenses that small businesses need to deal with as they get off the ground. Rest assured, you can deduct everything from flyers to billboards to business cards, and even a new website. Political advertising is the biggest exception to this rule. Those expenses are not deductible.

34. Charitable Deductions.
Yes, your small business can donate to charity and take a deduction for it. It can donate supplies, money, or property to a recognized charity, but pay attention to the rules before you go crazy giving stuff away. Donations of your time don’t count, and you can’t wipe out your business income with donations. Also, check with the IRS before you make a charitable deduction to make sure the organization you want to support qualifies for the deduction.

35. Cleaning and Janitorial Expenses.
You know all too well that the workday isn’t over when you flip the sign on the door to say “Closed.” If you hire any type of cleaning service, make sure you take your small business tax deduction.

36. Moving Expenses.
Did you need to move to start your business? If you’re a sole proprietor or self-employed worker and you had to move more than 50 miles for business, you may be able to deduct some of your moving expenses from your taxes. Specifically, you may be able to deduct packing and transportation costs, utility and service connection fees, and travel costs. However, you can’t deduct the cost of any meals or security deposits you’ve had to pay.

Lastly, to qualify for these deductions, you will need to remain a full-time employee of the business that required you to move for at least 78 weeks out of the following two years.

37. Intangibles like Licenses, Trademarks, and other Intellectual Property.
Most of the time, expenses related to the registering or protection of intellectual property are deductible. However, the process you go about it can differ depending on what you’re trying to deduct. Some costs must be depreciated over multiple years, while others can be fully deducted within the year in which they were incurred. For example, licensing fees are typically considered capital expenses that must be depreciated. However, trademarks can often be deducted in the same tax year. If you’re uncertain, we recommend working with a tax professional to ensure you’re in compliance with the regulations governing your specific situation.

No matter what type of small business entity you have, you have to pay quarterly estimated taxes if the business owes income taxes of $1,000 or more. Corporations only have to pay quarterly estimated taxes if they expect to owe $500 or more in tax for the year.

Before you owned a business, filing taxes was a one-time thing. But as a small business owner, you’ll have to pay the IRS four times per year. On one hand, that’s four more tax deadlines you might miss. But on the bright side, by the time your yearly tax deadline comes around, you’ll have already paid three-quarters of your tax return.

To make things even more complicated, businesses must deposit federal income tax withheld from employees, federal unemployment taxes, and both the employer and employee social security and Medicare taxes. Depositing can be on a semi-weekly or monthly schedule.

Whether you’re filing your taxes quarterly or holding off for the next annual deadline, you should begin preparing for your taxes by keeping records of your expenses as of January of each year. Make sure to document each of these small business tax deductions by keeping physical receipts and writing down the business reason for the expense on your receipts as soon as you receive it.

With this comprehensive list of small business tax deductions, you’ll be well on your way to saving on your taxes this year. However, deductions can be tricky, it’s always best to consult a tax expert for any questions that might arise to ensure you are complying with all regulation and avoid any penalties.

Credit given to Sara Sugar. Published in MONEY & PROFITS on Jan 21, 2020.  

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author, Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

Special Holiday Edition December 23, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Depreciation options, General, Retirement, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Enjoy the Holidays!

We are going to take a break from our tax and business tips this week.  Instead, the family of Bradstreet & Company would like to wish you and your family the most joyous holiday season and best wishes for 2021.

We hope you enjoy the Tax Tip of The Week.  As always, your topic suggestions and questions are always appreciated.

Is the Tax Tip of the Week real?

While your kids are questioning if Santa is real, we continue to receive some interesting feedback that some of you don’t realize this is really Bradstreet CPAs reaching out each week (… some suspect this is a “packaged” communication to which we add our logo.) Well, rest assured it’s us and we love to hear from you.
Enjoy the week and, “Yes Virgina, there is a Santa Claus”.

Wishing you all great things,

The Staff at Bradstreet & Company

Final Rules on Business & Entertainment Deductions November 18, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

The IRS has still not cashed many of our clients checks BUT they have found the time to issue final rules on business meals and entertainment.  Small wonder the government is running short on cash.  Interesting times!

Long story short – not much changed on business meals and entertainment deductions unless you get down deep into the weeds.  Entertainment is still nondeductible.  Go figure!

                                -Mark Bradstreet

IRS releases final rules on business meals and entertainment

The IRS on Wednesday issued final regulations (T.D. 9925) implementing provisions of the law known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), P.L. 115-97, that disallow a business deduction for most entertainment expenses. The regulations also clarify the treatment of business deductions for food and beverages that remain deductible, generally limited to 50% of qualifying expenditures, and how taxpayers may distinguish those expenditures from entertainment.

The final regulations adopt, with a number of clarifications in response to comments, proposed regulations issued in February 2020 (REG-100814-19; see also “Proposed Regs. Issued on Meal and Entertainment Expense Deductions,” JofA, Feb. 24, 2020). The proposed regulations were based, in turn, on Notice 2018-76, published in October 2018.

Sec. 274(a)(1)(A) generally disallows a deduction for any activity of a type generally considered entertainment, amusement, or recreation. Before their deletion by the TCJA, effective for amounts paid or incurred after Dec. 31, 2017, the subsection allowed several exceptions, including for entertainment that was preceded or followed by substantial and bona fide business discussions. The TCJA did not repeal other exceptions under Secs. 274(e)(1) through (9), including, for example, certain recreational activities for the benefit of employees, reimbursed expenses, and entertainment treated as compensation to an employee or includible in gross income of a nonemployee as compensation for services or as a prize or award (and reported by the taxpayer as such).

The TCJA similarly removed a reference to entertainment in Sec. 274(n)(1) with respect to the 50% limitation of deductibility of food or beverages, but it left that provision otherwise intact. Also remaining with respect to food or beverage expenses are the Sec. 274(k) general requirements that they not be lavish or extravagant under the circumstances and that the taxpayer or an employee of the taxpayer is present when food or beverages are served. Food and beverages must also be an ordinary and necessary business expense under Sec. 162(a).

The TCJA also applied the 50% limitation on food or beverages to de minimis fringe employee benefits under Sec. 132(e) (unless another exception under Sec. 274(e) applies), which formerly were not subject to it.

Thus, business taxpayers must separate deductible meal expenses from nondeductible entertainment expenses, and the regulations address how this is done in a variety of circumstances.

The regulations clarify that “entertainment” for purposes of Sec. 274(a) does not include food or beverages unless they are provided at or during an entertainment activity and their costs are not separately stated from the entertainment costs.

The final regulations provide that the food or beverages must be provided to a “person with whom the taxpayer could reasonably expect to engage or deal in the active conduct of the taxpayer’s trade or business such as the taxpayer’s customer, client, supplier, employee, agent, partner, or professional adviser, whether established or prospective.”

Accordingly, the final regulations apply this definition to employer-provided food or beverage expenses by considering employees as a type of business associate, as well as to the deduction for expenses for meals provided by a taxpayer to both employees and nonemployee business associates at the same event.

The final regulations added several new examples to the proposed regulations and slightly modified others in response to comments asking for clarification.

The final regulations are effective upon their publication in the Federal Register. Taxpayers may also rely upon the proposed regulations for expenses paid or incurred after Dec. 31, 2017.

Credit Given to:  Paul Bonner (Paul.Bonner@aicpa-cima.com) a Journal of Accountancy senior editor.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This week’s Author – Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

Understanding AGI and How to Calculate it October 21, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, Deductions, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

What’s adjusted gross income? Here’s what to know about this important income tax calculation.

WHEN IT COMES TO filing income taxes, it’s essential to understand your adjusted gross income, or AGI, and its relationship to certain tax benefits.
“The reason it matters is because a lot of deductions, tax credits, whether or not you can contribute to certain retirement accounts depends on your AGI,” says Michele Cagan, certified public accountant and author of “Debt 101.” “A lot hangs on it.”

In fact, recently, Americans’ eligibility for COVID-19 stimulus checks was tied to adjusted gross income reported in 2018 or 2019. The final amount taxpayers receive will depend on their 2020 AGI.

Ready to understand this essential tax concept? Here’s what to know about AGI, how it’s calculated and strategies to reduce your adjusted gross income.

What Is Adjusted Gross Income, or AGI?

AGI is a calculation of income for tax purposes that measures taxable earnings while subtracting certain tax deductions. For 2020 income taxes, it’s marked on line 11 of your Form 1040, according to IRS draft forms.

“Basically it’s all of your income minus certain adjustments that are found on Schedule 1,” says Eva Rosenberg, a Los Angeles-based enrolled agent and founder of TaxMama.com.

Why Is AGI Important?

Your adjusted gross income is an important tax calculation because eligibility for many tax deductions, tax credits and other tax breaks are tied to it, Cagan says. “It can lock you out of tax benefits if your AGI is too high,” she says.

For example, your AGI impacts limitations on these itemized deductions:

It will also determine your eligibility for and amount received in certain tax credits, including the earned income credit and retirement savings contribution credit.

Recently, the stimulus checks designed to combat the coronavirus’ economic repercussions was tied to AGI. The full $1,200 per taxpayer is available to single filers earning less than $75,000 in adjusted gross income and married filers earning less than $150,000 in 2020. Reduced amounts are available to taxpayers earning an adjusted gross income of less than $99,000 if single or $198,000 if married filing jointly.

How Do I Calculate AGI?

AGI is calculated this way:

All income
– exclusions from income
= gross income
– deductions for AGI
= adjusted gross income

On a practical note, most tax software programs will take you through the steps to calculate adjusted gross income within their interfaces. A tax professional can also help you calculate this number.

Here are the elements of the calculation in more detail.

All income. To determine this, collect income statements from all sources, including businesses, unemployment compensation, insurance, wages, investments, gifts and other sources.

Exclusions from income. Certain types of income are excluded from gross income for the purposes of calculating adjusted gross income. Depending on the circumstances, those could include these sources of income:

If you’re not sure whether an income source is excluded, consult with a tax professional.

Deductions for AGI. To calculate adjusted gross income, you’ll be able to subtract certain above-the-line deductions from gross income. Those deductions include:

Additionally, taxpayers who don’t itemize may deduct $300 in cash donations to charity. This is due to the coronavirus stimulus bill and new for 2020 taxes.

Keep in mind that some of these deductions are capped at a certain level. Subtracting them will yield your AGI. It’s simple math, although identifying the appropriate income sources and deductions may be less simple.

How Do I Reduce AGI?

A key tax-planning strategy is to reduce adjusted gross income to make the taxpayer eligible for more generous tax benefits. Most of those strategies are best enacted before Dec. 31, Rosenberg says. “If you’re looking at AGI, and it’s starting to make you ineligible for some things, it’s important to do the planning before the end of the year,” she says.

For example, you may want to generate investment losses by selling off stocks or securities at a loss to reduce your AGI, she says. Or you could consider making a contribution to your IRA or self-employed retirement plan. Contribute to your health savings account if you’re eligible or consider taking the deduction for tuition and fees interest.

“Every little bit makes a difference when you’re trying to reduce AGI,” Cagan says.

What’s the Difference Between AGI and Modified Adjusted Gross Income, or MAGI?

Don’t confuse AGI with modified AGI. To calculate your eligibility for certain tax benefits, such as the deduction associated with contributions to an IRA, modified adjusted gross income may be used.

Rosenberg says that different credits and deductions require different calculations for modified AGI. “Sometimes modified adjusted gross income might not include certain deductions,” she says. “Sometimes it may include nontaxable income, so there are different elements.”

Take note of whether a tax benefit you’re eyeing is tied to AGI or MAGI. If it’s tied to MAGI, you may have to do some extra math to determine your eligibility. It is entirely possible, however, that depending your financial situation, your AGI and MAGI will be the same since some of these deductions and forms of income are uncommon.

Credit given to US News & World Report published on Sept 17, 2020 by Susannah Snider

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

–until next week.

5 New Rules for Charitable Giving October 14, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Charitable Giving, Deductions, Depreciation options, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes , add a comment

New tax laws and strategies can help you maximize tax breaks for yourself and benefits for the charity.

THERE ARE SO MANY reasons to make charitable gifts this year – whether it’s to support nonprofits that help people and communities with challenges from the coronavirus pandemic, or to provide assistance after disasters such as the Beirut explosion or an active hurricane season.

Even though a lot of people are struggling financially right now, many people whose finances have stabilized want to do whatever they can to help out. And they’re not waiting until the end of the year to make their gifts. “A lot of things are driving people to be generous, and our numbers prove it,” says Kim Laughton, president of Schwab Charitable, which runs Schwab’s donor-advised funds. From January through June 2020, its donors recommended over $1.7 billion in 330,000 grants, almost a 50% increase in the dollars granted and the number of grants compared to the same period in 2019. “There’s great need out there, and people are stepping up.”

“Philanthropy and giving is on everyone’s mind,” says Dien Yuen, who holds the Blunt-Nickel Professorship in Philanthropy at the American College of Financial Services. Some nonprofits need help now just to stay afloat. “The donors who are quite active are making gifts now and not waiting until later in the year, because the nonprofit might not be there later on.”

New tax laws and strategies can help you maximize tax breaks for yourself and the benefits for the charity. Here’s what you need to know:

New $300 Charitable Deduction for Non-Itemizers

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, created several incentives for people to help charities right away, including a charitable deduction of up to $300 in 2020, even if you don’t itemize. Otherwise, you generally need to itemize to take the charitable deduction, which fewer people do since the standard deduction doubled a few years ago – now at $12,400 for single filers and $24,800 for married couples filing jointly in 2020.

“As a result of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, most taxpayers utilize the significantly higher standard deduction instead of itemizing deductions for mortgage interest, state taxes paid and charitable contributions,” says Mark Alaimo, a certified public accountant and certified financial planner in Lawrence, Massachusetts. “This special CARES Act provision now gives a tax incentive to all taxpayers to give at least $300 to charity during 2020.” To qualify, the gift must be made in cash and go directly to the charity, rather than to a donor-advised fund or private foundation.

“I think that the additional $300 provision in the CARES Act is really great, especially for the younger generation who may be just starting to work and may not be paying substantial mortgage interest,” says Kelsey Clair, tax strategist for Baird’s Private Wealth Management Group. “It allows them to give even in a small way and reap the tax benefit for it.”

The CARES Act also helps people who are in a financial position to make very large gifts. In 2020, you can deduct cash gifts of up to 100% of your adjusted gross income, rather than the usual 60% limit. To qualify for this higher limit, the gifts must go directly to the charities, rather than to a donor-advised fund or private foundation. This can help wealthy people reduce their taxable income significantly in 2020, and it may also help retirees who have money to give but bump up against the income limits for the deduction. “I see it in the older generation who have a lot of cash but don’t have a lot of income coming in and are trying to help out the community in any way they can,” says Clair.

Bunching Contributions and Donor-Advised Funds

Bunching contributions is a strategy that became popular after the standard deduction was increased. Instead of making smaller charitable contributions spread over several years, you can make larger contributions in one year so you can itemize your deductions (and claim the charitable deduction) that year, then take the standard deduction in the other years. “Rather than making a steady stream of charitable contributions from year to year, it may be beneficial instead to use a bunching strategy – give more and itemize in one year, and claim the standard deduction in other years,” says Clair.

Even though this can help you tax-wise, you might not want to give all of the money to the charities at one time and then neglect them over the next few years. But bunching can work well if you have a donor-advised fund. These funds are offered by brokerage firms, banks and community foundations, and you can take the charitable deduction in the year you give the money to the donor-advised fund, but then you have an unlimited amount of time to decide which charities to support. You can usually open a donor-advised fund with an initial contribution of $5,000 to $10,000 (it’s $5,000 at Schwab and Fidelity, $10,000 at T. Rowe Price, and $25,000 at Vanguard). You can make grants to charities of $50 or $100 up to thousands of dollars or more, and you can invest the money in a handful of mutual funds or investing pools until you make the grants. “It can be a great way to go ahead and make the contribution, without having to decide where that money goes right away,” says Clair.

Another benefit of the donor-advised fund is simplicity – you get one receipt for your tax records when you make the contribution and don’t have to wait for a variety of paperwork from each of the charities. “Donor-advised funds really help with the administrative side of things,” says Elliot Dole, a certified financial planner with Buckingham Strategic Wealth in St. Louis. “Itemizing charitable gifts is a hot button audit area. But with a donor-advised fund, it’s clear that you met the requirements.”

A Double Tax Break From Giving Appreciated Stock

Many people just write a check to the charity, but you may get a bigger tax benefit if you give appreciated stock. If you owned the stock for more than a year, you can deduct the value of the stock on the date you give it to the charity if you itemize. And even if you don’t itemize, you can avoid having to pay long-term capital gains taxes on your profits, which could have cost up to 20% if you sold the stock first. (Giving appreciated stock doesn’t qualify for the special $300 charitable deduction for non-itemizers for 2020; that only applies to cash.)

Most charities can accept appreciated stock, but the process can be easier if you have a donor-advised fund. “Given how volatile the stock market can be, many advisors recommend utilizing donor-advised funds due to the ease and speed that one can make a contribution,” says Alaimo. “This makes it easier to opportunistically gift highly appreciated securities, while regulating which charity receives how much of the donation, and when they receive it.”

It’s even easier if your brokerage account and donor-advised fund are with the same company. “When you log into your Schwab accounts, it shows your investment accounts, your bank accounts and your charitable account,” says Laughton. You can sort your investments by most highly appreciated or highly concentrated and see if you’re overweighted in one area. “We encourage people to rebalance their portfolios regularly, and when they see they’re overconcentrated, instead of selling those shares, they can just move them over to their charitable account,” says Laughton.

With so much stock market volatility this year, you may want to donate the stock when it reaches a target price, rather than giving at a certain time of year.

The donor-advised fund can also accept a variety of contributions – whether you write a check or you give appreciated stock, privately held stock, real estate, limited partnerships or even a horse farm. “It always makes sense for people who have highly appreciated non-cash assets to at least explore whether they could make good charitable gifts,” says Laughton. “Donor-advised funds can make that simple and easy.”

If you have investments that have lost value, however, it’s better to sell them first – and take a Charitable loss – and then give the cash to charity. “I’ve seen multiple times where people made mistakes of donating stocks that were in a loss,” says Clair. “It’s better to sell that and claim the loss on your return and donate the cash.” When you sell the losing stock, you can use the loss to offset your capital gains and can use up to $3,000 in losses to reduce your ordinary income, which you couldn’t do if you gave the stock directly to the charity.

Make a Tax-Free Transfer From Your IRA

People who are age 70½ and older can give up to $100,000 per year tax-free from their IRA to charity, a procedure called a qualified charitable distribution or QCD. The gift counts as their required minimum distribution but isn’t included in their adjusted gross income. (Even though the SECURE Act, another recent tax law, increased the age to start taking RMDs from 70½ to 72, you can still make a qualified charitable distribution any time after you turn age 70½.)

This is usually a great strategy for people who have to take RMDs and would like to give money to charity – they can help the charity and not have to pay taxes on the money they have to withdraw from their IRA. But because of the CARES Act, people are not required to take RMDs in 2020. However, you may still be able to benefit from making a QCD this year. “Some people who have been doing the QCD have been supporting a couple of charities every year, and they’re not going to stop, especially during this time of need,” says Yuen. The tax-free transfer takes money out of your IRA, which can help reduce future RMDs. “It’s great planning,” she says.

To keep the money out of your AGI, it must be transferred directly from your IRA to the charity – you can’t withdraw it first. Ask your IRA administrator about the procedure, and let the charity know the money is coming. You have to give this money directly to a charity; it can’t go to a donor-advised fund.

Make an Extra Effort to Research Charities This Year

Scam artists have been out in full force to take advantage of the coronavirus pandemic. It’s even more important now to check out charities before you give money, especially if they contact you first. You can look up charities at sites such as Charity Navigator and the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. Local community foundations are also a great resource for aid focused on your community – see the Community Foundation Locator for links. If you have a donor-advised fund, you may have access to additional research tools, such as GuideStar.

Schwab Charitable can help its donors vet the charities and also provides lists of selected charities that focus on timely issues, such as COVID-19 relief and social justice. “We’re trying to develop short lists to help people narrow the charities down to ones we know are valid and doing good work,” says Laughton.

Credit given to US News & World Report published Aug 21, 2020 by Kimberly Lankford.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

–until next week.

What Will Filing Taxes Be Like in 2021 – And How Can You Prepare? September 30, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, COVID, COVID-19, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Some of the tax return changes listed below provide us with likely insights into the IRS’s future audit and cross matching software programs.  The IRS is always trying to close the so-called “tax gap.”  The tax gap is the amount of income taxes due which are not paid in a timely or voluntary fashion.  One of the studies in recent years indicated that about 16 percent of taxes are never paid.  At the time of this study, that amount represented about 18 percent of annual federal revenues (this study was pre-COVID era).

Let me share my thoughts on the dangers of two of the new changes below as recapped by Morris Armstrong.  The first change is the possibility of deferring the deposit and payment of the employer’s portion of the Social Security taxes.  The second one involves receiving retirement plan distributions and deferring their repayments.  Both are akin to kicking the can down the road which typically sounds like a good idea.  But, keep in mind, there is a day of reckoning.  Failure to later pay either the employer’s portion of the Social Security taxes or your retirement plan distributions will result in interest and penalties and maybe even additional income taxes.  Don’t get me wrong, sometimes kicking the can down the road is the only option one may have.  And, if that is the case, then I would take full advantage of the tax law.

-Mark Bradstreet


“THERE HAVE BEEN CHANGES to the tax code this year, and they will be reflected on the Form 1040 of your tax return.

Each year, if necessary, the IRS releases drafts of the forms so professionals may comment, and line numbers are subject to change. However, the advance notice is always appreciated and can give insights into what next year’s taxes will look like.

Here’s how tax-filing will look different in 2021 – when 2020 income taxes are filed – and what you can do to prepare.

A New Focus on Cryptocurrency
This year, the Department of Treasury is focusing on virtual currencies. The first question asks this: At any time during 2020, did you receive, sell, send, exchange, or otherwise acquire any financial interest in any virtual currency?

Over the past several years, the government has focused on cryptocurrencies, issued guidance on its tax treatment and advised certain taxpayers that they may have failed to report transactions properly. Likely, the government must feel that it has in place the infrastructure to trace your transactions.

As you answer this question, remember that you are signing the tax return under penalties of perjury, a conviction of which can carry a five-year prison sentence.

Adjustment to Income Via Charity
A bonus to taxpayers in 2020 is that they may be eligible to reduce their income by up to $300 for charitable contributions, thanks to the coronavirus relief bill.

These contributions must be in the form of cash, check or credit card payments, and you must have the proper documentation. You may not deduct donations of items such as the four bags of clothing that you dropped off at Goodwill this spring.

This “adjustment to income” is nice because it reduces your adjusted gross income, also called AGI, which impacts many other aspects of your financial life. Your Medicare Part B and Medicare Part D premiums and programs at the state level are tethered to AGI. So, having a lower adjusted gross income can reduce those premiums or make you eligible for additional state programs.

Prepare by keeping your receipts and other substantiating documents. Remember, contributions of $250 or more to a charity require a letter of acknowledgment.

Look Out for Changes in Reporting Taxes Paid
In the past, when you reported the amount of federal tax withheld, you reported one number. This would be the paid federal income tax shown on your W-2 and on any 1099 form.

This year, the numbers are being reported on separate lines, and that could mean that someone at the IRS will be focusing on 1099s in the future.

Tax Credit Reconciling the Economic Impact Payments
Line 30 seems to be reserved for something that the government is calling a recovery rebate credit, which refers to the stimulus payments you received. This is where you may receive an additional credit if your 2020 tax return has a smaller AGI than the one that was used to calculate the initial stimulus check or if you have additional dependents.

Prepare by keeping the letter from the IRS telling you how much you received. It is Notice 1444 that you want to have available when you are filing your tax returns.

Payroll Tax Deferment Impacts the Amount You Owe
If you had household employees or are self-employed, which you report on Schedule H and Schedule SE, you may have to pay extra attention to this calculation.

Normally, the calculation is a simple addition of the taxes owed minus any payments and credits, but this year, we have a wrinkle. The coronavirus relief bill allows employers to defer the deposit and payment of the employer’s portion of the Social Security taxes.

The span of March 27 through Dec. 31, 2020 is important because any payroll taxes that were due then may be deferred, with 50% paid by Dec. 31, 2021, and the balance by Dec. 31, 2022. If you are a Schedule C filer, this will apply to you.

Flexibility Around Retirement Plan Distributions for Taxpayers Impacted by COVID-19
The coronavirus relief bill allows for distributions from a retirement account, including an IRA, to be handled differently if the taxpayer was impacted by COVID-19. This does not require contracting the disease but includes having your economic life disrupted by it.

You could be quarantined, furloughed, laid-off or had work hours reduced, been unable to work because you could not find child care– if it is virus related – and qualify for this retirement plan provision.

When the taxpayer self-certifies to these facts, the tax impact is substantial. There will be no 10% penalty if you take a distribution while under the age of 59½, the distribution will be spread over three years, and the taxpayer may repay the amount taken out over three years and avoid taxation.

Prepare by keeping documentation. Since you are self-certifying that you are impacted, you may want to keep any medical records, notices from your employers or notes describing your circumstances.

For most people, these are the main changes that will impact their personal 1040 Form. But keep in mind that Congress is still in session, it is an election year and more changes are possible.”

Credit given to US News & World Report published Sept 1, 2020 by Morris Armstrong.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This week’s author – Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

BWC Board Approves 10% Rate Cut for Public Employers September 23, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Ohio’s public employers will pay $14.8 million less in premiums to the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) in 2021 thanks to a rate cut the BWC Board of Directors approved Friday.

The rate reduction means approximately 3,700 counties, cities, public schools and other public taxing districts will pay an average of 10% less on their annual premiums than this calendar year. The reduction, made possible by declining injury trends and relatively low medical inflation costs, is the twelfth cut for public employers since 2009 and follows a 10% cut that went into effect in January.

“We are pleased to pass these savings along to our public employer community, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to challenge our economy,” said BWC Administrator/CEO Stephanie McCloud. “It is our hope they invest these dollars in workplace safety and improving their communities.”

The 10% reduction represents an average statewide change to premiums and does not include costs related to the administrative cost fund or other funds BWC administers. The actual total premium paid by individual employers depends on several factors, including the expected future claims costs in their industry, their company’s recent claims history, and their participation in various BWC programs.

A history of BWC rate changes since 2000 can be found online by clicking this link.

Credit given to BWC Website, News Release August 24, 2020

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

–until next week.

Good Record-keeping is an Essential Element of Tax Planning September 16, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

I can go on ad nauseum about the importance of good record-keeping. Of course, being an accountant, I may be more than a little biased. I won’t say that good record-keeping is THE most important piece of the business world BUT it is certainly near the top. You simply must have a way to keep score. Without knowing the score, you may be using the wrong playbook. Most businesses have poor records which results in inaccurate financial statements. Making decisions from incorrect data just sets the stage for a disaster. Eventually, most of your day will be wasted answering calls from past due or incorrect payments on your invoices, screwed up orders, improper or missed billings, unable to obtain credit, poor credit history and losing money all the while not knowing you are underwater until it is too late.
                                                -Mark

Now is a good time for people to begin thinking about next year’s tax return. While it may seem early to be preparing for 2021, reviewing your record-keeping now will pay off when it comes time to file again.

Here are some suggestions to help taxpayers keep good records:

Credit given to – IRS.gov – click here for original article

This week’s Author – Mark Bradstreet, CPA

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

–until next week.