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Tax Tip of the Week | No. 435 | Passive Activity Losses November 29, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Nov 29, 2017 | No. 435 | Passive Activity Losses

Passive activity losses are also known as PAL’s. However, from a tax standpoint, they are anything but your PAL.

A passive activity is a business activity in which the taxpayer does not materially participate. There are seven tests for material participation, and you only need to pass one of the tests to be considered active. But most investors do not meet any of the tests.

Beginning in 1986, you may only deduct a passive activity loss to the extent you have passive activity income. A PAL cannot offset non-passive income or portfolio income.

The passive activity rules were passed by Congress in 1986 in an effort to limit the losses being deducted by many taxpayers through the use of tax shelters. Prior to enactment, taxpayers could invest in a myriad of limited partnership interests or other passive activities, most of which generated losses that the investors would deduct on their personal returns.

The passive activity rules prevented such deductions, causing many taxpayers to search for PIG’s (passive income generators). Those looking for PIG’s need to be cautious as to the type of investment they are buying. For instance, your broker might try to sell you an interest in a publicly traded partnership (PTP). However, these types of partnerships have their own set of rules, and might not be the PIG you were hoping for.

Rentals are another form of passive activity. Ordinary rental income or loss is passive by definition. Even if you are active in a rental activity, the net income or loss is still considered passive (assuming you are not a real estate professional). However, if certain conditions are met, a landlord can deduct up to $25,000 of rental loss on his or her return, even if there is no other passive income. Since net rental income is considered passive income, non-rental passive losses can be used to offset the income.

Any PAL limited by passive activity income is not lost but carried forward indefinitely, usually until the property is sold. In the year of sale, you can deduct the suspended loss, up to the amount of your basis in the activity.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

This week’s author….Norman S. Hicks, CPA

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 433 | Municipal Net Profit Tax Return November 15, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, tax changes, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Nov 15, 2017 | No. 433 | Municipal Net Profit Tax Return

There are over 600 Ohio cities and villages that levy a municipal income tax. These taxes are administered by the  individual municipalities or by third party administrators. Business taxpayers are required to file and pay tax in every municipality where income is earned. The new plan is for the state to administer the business net profit tax. Note, this would not include sole proprietors and single member LLCs. This could be a savings of $800 million to municipalities and businesses if all businesses file centrally.

According to the Tax Reform Plan, the business taxpayer will have the choice to file and have the net profit tax administered by multiple individual municipalities or to file with Ohio Department of Taxation. This is an ‘Opt-in’ choice and is not mandatory.

Advantages for ODT will be one uniform tax return and one consistent governing body which will allow filing multiple municipalities to one central location. ODT will provide taxpayer information to the municipalities.

ODT Role:
Propose rules
Prescribe forms
Issue bills, assessments, refunds
Conduct audits, certify debts
Handle appeals & other administrative matters

Municipality Role:
Retain responsibility for Employee Withholding & Individual filings
Retain control over tax rate and tax credits

Business taxpayers who want the cost savings of reporting and filing municipal tax are urged by the Ohio Tax Commissioner to sign up for a major new and convenient tax filing service. Businesses wanting to ‘opt-in’ for the centralized filing and state administration of the municipal net profit tax for the 2018 tax year can register now at the Department of Taxation’s website (www.tax.ohio.gov). Business taxpayers need to register specifically for the municipal net profit tax to take advantage of this new one-stop, cost-saving system, even if registered with the state to pay other taxes.

Municipal Net Profit Tax Reform Timeline:
By March 1, 2018 – business (calendar year filers) registers through OBG
By April 15, 2018 – business makes first quarterly estimated payment
By April 15, 2019 – business files Tax Year 2018 tax return

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 431 | Miscellaneous Tax Facts November 1, 2017

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Tax Tip of the Week | Nov 1, 2017 | No. 431 | Miscellaneous Tax Facts

1.    The easiest IRS tax form, Form 1040 needs more than 100 pages of explanation. When the IRS first introduced Form 1040, it had only 4 pages including the instructions.

2.    Close to one-half of American homes pay zero federal income tax.

3.    The top 1% of Americans pay 43% of all federal tax collected.

4.    Today’s richest Americans pay 39.6% on each $1.00 earned. That may seem high. However, in 1945 the top rate peaked at 94%. Amazingly, in 1913, the tax rate was 1%.

5.    The Internal Revenue Code is more than 10 million words long. It has grown an average of 144,500 words per year since 1955.

6.    The typical American receives about $3,000 for their IRS refund.

7.    The average effective income tax rate is 13.5%. That is most likely much lower than your top tax bracket.

8.    The sale of your home may be the most generous and unused tax exemption. Generally, if you have lived in your home for two out of the last five years and you are married, you may exclude up to $500,000 of your gain, $250,000 if single.

9.    The IRS is the world’s largest financial institution.

10.   In 2014, 35% of calls made to the IRS went unanswered.

11.   The original deadline for paying income taxes was March 1st.

12.   In 2014, for every $100 collected by the IRS, it spent $0.38.

13.   The IRS is active on social media using their accounts to educate the public.

14.   Around 15% of U.S. taxpayers are delinquent on their taxes.

Credit to The Motley Fool and FactRetriever.com

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 429 | Cash Method vs. Accrual Method of Accounting (Generally Speaking) October 18, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Oct 18, 2017 | No. 429 | Cash Method vs. Accrual Method of Accounting (Generally Speaking)

Many taxpayers are unaware of the method of accounting used for their business income tax returns. And, many businesses are unaware that a different accounting method may also be used for their financial statements. Yes, effectively, creating two sets of books.

Typically, the two most common accounting method choices are the cash method and the accrual method.

Use of the cash basis method of accounting (if eligible) will usually result in lower income taxes than the accrual method for a particular period of time. This is especially true when a business is growing.  However, if a business is experiencing a decline in revenues, additional taxes may be incurred as a result of reporting on the cash basis.

On the other hand, accrual basis accounting will often show the largest bottom line on your financial statements. This may be important when reporting your financial results to your bank and/or your bonding company. Both always enjoy seeing good news.

Thusly, these two methods may show significantly different results even, when accounting for essentially the same transactions. One may wonder how that could be. Well, the cash basis reports only taxable income when it is received in cash. Also, under this method, a tax deduction does not occur unless a cash disbursement for an expense has occurred.  The accrual method shows the income once the sale is completed and the expense when incurred which can more accurately reflect your net income.

The choice of an accounting method is a big one.  Its importance grows with the size of your business.  If you ever decide to change methods, please remember that some changes require Internal Revenue Service approval, while others are automatic. Regardless, your accounting method choice should be evaluated on an annual basis.

This week’s author….Mark Bradstreet, CPA

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 427 | Top 10 Things to Know About Amending Returns October 4, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, tax changes, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Oct 4, 2017 | No. 427 | Top 10 Things to Know About Amending Returns

If you need to make a change or correct your federal tax return after it has been filed you will use Form 1040X. Here are the top 10 things you need to know when filing a 1040X:

1.    To file a 1040X, it must be mailed—you cannot e-file an amended return.

2.    You normally don’t need to file an amended return to correct math errors.  The IRS will automatically correct math errors and send you a bill or refund.

3.    You can track the status of the 1040X three weeks after filing.  To track the status, go to www.irs.gov and click on the “Where’s My Amended Return” link.  Note:  it can take up to 12 weeks for the IRS to process an amended return.

4.     If a refund is due from the original return, wait until you receive the refund before filing the 1040X to claim additional refund amounts.

5.     If more tax is due, file a 1040X and pay the tax as soon as possible to reduce any interest and penalties.

6.     You usually have three years to file an amended return.  See the 1040X instructions for the exact details.

7.      If you are amending more than one tax year, prepare a 1040X for each year and mail them in separate envelopes.

8.      If you use other IRS forms or schedules to make changes, attach those forms to the submitted 1040X.

9.     The most important section on the 1040X form is the “Explanation of Changes”.  You need to clearly and precisely explain why you are submitting an amended return and what changes you are making.

10.    If the changes you make on the federal return also results in a change to your Ohio return be sure to submit an Ohio amended return as well. Note: Ohio no longer uses a special amended tax return.  Instead, use the normal Ohio IT 1040 return and mark the “Amended” box located on the top of page 1.

Let us know if you have any questions about filing an amended return.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 421 | The Most Overlooked Business Deduction August 23, 2017

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Tax Tip of the Week | Aug 23, 2017 | No. 421 | The Most Overlooked Business Deduction

Way back in 2004 Congress added a new Internal Revenue Code Section that allows a deduction to businesses just for operating a business. There is no requirement to buy anything, there is no requirement to spend anything, and there is no requirement to borrow anything. This deduction is available to sole proprietors, farmers, LLC’s, S corporations and C Corporations, and is available just for “doing what you are doing”. Yes, it is a true made-up deduction, just like non-cash charity deductions, only this one is legal! We call this deduction the Domestic Production Activities Deduction (DPAD), but the IRS calls it the manufacturer’s and producer’s deduction.

The deduction is 9% of the lesser of net income or qualified production income (the deduction is limited to 50% of wages). So nearly any business with qualified production income is able to take an additional 9% deduction just for producing a product. This means that a farmer gets a 9% of net income deduction without spending any more money. It means machine shop clients, builders, developers, manufacturers, print shop operators and many more business owners will get this deduction as well.

The deduction is aimed at companies that produce a tangible product in the United States, and that employ workers to do so. And yes, it is 9% of the profit! The owner that qualifies and makes $100,000 will only pay tax on $91,000 if you remember this deduction.

The deduction is taken on IRS Form 8903, which has been unchanged for many years. It is taken directly on the applicable schedule C or F, or as a flow through item on a K-1 for partnerships, LLCs and S corporations.

The deduction is available to taxpayers whose activities are the manufacture, production or growth of items they sell, which include:

•    The sale of tangible personal property
•    The sale of computer software (but not online services)
•    The sale of recordings, books, tapes, CD’s and DVD’s
•    Business interruption proceeds and payments not to produce
•    Farming, raising animals and fishing
•    Printing (including advertising sales in printed publications)
•    Most new construction and renovation.

Activities that do not qualify for the deduction include most service businesses and most grocery stores and restaurants unless the restaurant packages and sells products that it produced itself.

If you own a business, give us a call to make sure you are not missing out on this important deduction.

An upcoming event that would qualify for a personal charitable deduction would be attending the STEMM Charity Gala presented by the Dayton Defense Education Foundation. The Gala takes place on 9/23/17, more information and event registration can be found by clicking the link below:

http://www.daytondefense.org/home/events.html#id=146&cid=667&wid=401&type=Cal

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 419 | You Make The Call – Head of Household August 9, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Aug 9, 2017 | No. 419 | You Make The Call – Head of Household

You Make the Call is a monthly format of questions and answers our office faces on a daily basis.  We hope you will find these tips to be a quick and fun read.

QUESTION: The taxpayer’s mother lives in her home and she has provided care for her for several years. Her mother’s only income is from social security. The taxpayer pays over half of the living expenses for her mother, therefore she is her dependent. If her mother dies in January, can the taxpayer still claim head of household in the year of death?

ANSWER: Yes, as long as the taxpayer is eligible to claim her mother as a dependent. For head of household purposes, “The taxpayer and such other person must occupy the household for the entire taxable year of the taxpayer. However, the fact that such other person is born or dies within the taxable year will not prevent the taxpayer from qualifying as a head of household if the household constitutes the principal place of abode of such other person for the remaining or preceding part of such taxable year”. There is a similar explanation for dependency purposes that states, “The fact that the dependent dies during the year shall not deprive the taxpayer of the deduction if the dependent lived in the household for the entire part of the year preceding his death.”

Please note that the question and answer provided does not take into account all options or circumstances possible.  Call us if you find yourself in a similar situation.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 414 | You Make The Call – EITC July 5, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | July 5, 2017 | No. 414 | You Make The Call – EITC

You Make the Call is a monthly format of questions and answers our office faces on a daily basis.  We hope you will find these tips to be a quick and fun read.

QUESTION: Jamie and Claire are married and have total earned income of $40,000. They have a daughter, Bree, age 22 who graduated from college in May. After graduation, Bree moved back home with her parents and worked. She lived at home from June until December and earned $22,000.

Jamie and Claire would like to know if they are still eligible for the earned income tax credit (EITC) using Bree as a qualifying child for EITC purposes, and Bree would like to know if she may claim her own exemption when preparing her tax return this year.

ANSWER: Yes and yes. Under the qualifying child rules for purposes of dependency, Bree meets all the requirements except for support. Because she earns $22,000, she provides more than half of her own support. Therefore, Jamie and Claire may not claim her as a dependent. However, for EITC purposes because all the dependency tests are met, except for support, she is still a qualifying child for EITC. Therefore, Jamie and Claire may still receive EITC using Bree as a qualifying child for EITC purposes.

Additionally, because Bree is no longer a qualifying child for dependency purposes, she may claim her own exemption when she files her return.

Please note that the question and answer provided does not take into account all options or circumstances possible.  Call us if you find yourself in a similar situation.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.
Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 410 | You Make The Call – Home Basis June 7, 2017

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Tax Tip of the Week | June 7, 2017 | No. 410 | You Make The Call – Home Basis

You Make the Call is a monthly format of questions and answers our office faces on a daily basis.  We hope you will find these tips to be a quick and fun read.

QUESTION: Albert walks into our office and tells us that he bought a house from his parents. The house is worth $350,000, but his parents only made him pay $200,000. His parents paid $100,000 for this house a few years ago. After making several improvements, their adjusted basis in the home was $150,000 when they sold it to Albert. He did not assume any mortgages on the home. What is Albert’s basis in the home?

ANSWER: This is a part gift, part sale. Albert’s parents sold it for $200,000, and they gave him a gift of $150,000 ($350,000 FMV (fair market value) less $200,000 sales price). In a part gift, part sale, Albert’s basis is the greater of the amount he paid for it ($200,000), or his parent’s adjusted basis in the home ($150,000) at the time of transfer. Thus, his basis is $200,000.

Please note that the question and answer provided does not take into account all options or circumstances possible.  Call us if you find yourself in a similar situation.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.
Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 402 | Filing for an Extension April 12, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Tax Deadlines, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | April 12, 2017 | No. 402 | Filing for an Extension

If you haven’t filed your tax return by now, you should probably consider filing for an extension. It is a lot easier to file for an extension than it is to amend a return later for a mistake you made trying to rush your return to completion. Even more costly is if the IRS finds a mistake you made and assesses underpayment penalties and interest.

To file for an extension, you simply need to submit Form 4868. After submitting this form, you now have until October 16, 2017 to timely file your return.  Note, however, an extension of time to file is not an extension of time to pay.  If you suspect you will owe some taxes, you must send a payment along with the extension.  This is true for your federal, state and city returns.

Ohio will automatically accept the federal extension. Some cities, however, require a special city extension form. Also, some cities will not allow extensions if you only have W2 income.  Be sure to check with your work and/or resident cities before April 15th.

Another reason to file for extension is that some speculate your chances for an audit decreases for extended returns. How?  One of the methods the IRS uses to select a return for audit is to select a random sample of returns filed by April 17th.   If your return is not in that sample—then you don’t get picked!

Editor’s Note:  One of the pledges I make to all my clients is that my personal return will be the last one filed each year. When my most procrastinating client’s return is filed on October 16th —-mine is right behind it!  And has been that way for nearly 20 years!

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.

Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW…until next week.