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Five Things to Know About Proposed Tweaks to the Retirement Systems March 13, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, tax changes, Tax Deadlines, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

The following article, by Anne Tergesen (WSJ), discusses possible revisions to the USA retirement system. These “proposed tweaks” may never happen or if they do, the changes will most likely be different than what follows. When I first began in taxes, an elderly tax practitioner told me to stop worrying about the future tax law changes and to make my decisions based upon the current law. For more often than not, I thought that was good advice. But that is not to say, we should bury our heads in the sand and not consider the provisions that Congress is working on.

-Mark Bradstreet

“In addition to giving annuities a greater role in 401(k) plans as part of its proposals to tweak the U.S. retirement system, Congress is considering provisions that could serve to expand workers’ access to retirement-savings plans and make it easier for savers to tap their accounts in case of emergencies. Here are five changes Americans could see in their 401(k) plans and individual retirement accounts.

(1)     A New Item on 401(k) Disclosures
Currently, 401(k) plans are required to send participants quarterly and annual account statements with their balance. Under the proposed legislation, plan sponsors would have to show an estimate of the monthly income a participant’s balance could generate with an annuity, a detail akin to the payoff disclosures required on credit-card statements. The goal is to help workers better understand how prepared they are to maintain their income in retirement.

(2) A Repeal of the Age Limit on IRA Contributions
If you are 70 ½ or older, you can’t currently make deductible contributions to a traditional IRA. Congress is considering removing the age cap and allowing people above 70 ½ or older to deposit up to $6,500 a year in either a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA. With a traditional IRA, account holder’s generally get to subtract their contributions from their income but they must pay ordinary income taxes on the money when they withdraw it – something they are required to do starting at age 70 ½ (the bill would do nothing to change that). With a Roth IRA, there is no upfront tax deduction but the money increases tax-free.

(3) More Types of Savings Accounts
Among the proposals under consideration is a new type of universal savings account that would offer more-flexible withdrawal rules than existing retirement accounts, according to Rep. Kenny Marchant (R, Texas) Employers could also be allowed to automatically enroll workers into emergency savings accounts. (Employees would be free to opt out.)

(4)  More Ways for Graduate Students to Fund IRAs
The bill would allow students to contribute taxable stipend or fellowship payments to an IRA, something that’s not currently possible.

(5)  Pooled 401(k) Plans
For years policy makers have tried to make retirement-savings plans more attractive and affordable to small businesses, many of which have no plan at all. About one-half of private-sector employees, many of whom work for small companies, lack access to a workplace retirement plan. Under one measure before Congress, small employers would be able to more easily band together to spread out the administrative costs of 401(k) plans. The proposal would eliminate a requirement that employers have a connection, such as being members of the same industry trade group, in order to join a so-called multiple-employer plan. Congress is also considering expanding a tax credit available to small companies to offset the costs of starting a new retirement plan. The annual credit amount would increase from $500 to as much as $5,000 for three years.”

Credit given to Anne Tergesen, WSJ
Saturday/Sunday July 21-22, 2018

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This week’s author – Mark Bradstreet, CPA
–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | 11 Tax Deductions Every Independent Contractor Should Know About February 6, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Deadlines, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

11 Tax Deductions Every Independent Contractor Should Know About

    Tax Day 2019 is Monday, April 15.
•    If you work as an independent contractor, you are entitled to certain tax deductions for your business expenses.
•    Even if your contract work is just a side gig, you’re still running a business, so it’s important to track your expenses.
•    We spoke with CPA and certified financial planner Harvey I. Bezozi about the deductions that independent contractors can use to reduce the amount of tax they owe.

With the rise of the gig economy, many more people now have to consider the tax implications of working as independent contractors. When you are an independent contractor, the IRS considers you a business owner, even if you contract full-time for one client.

Independent contracting comes with additional tax burdens (e.g., there is no employer contribution, so the entire payroll tax burden falls to you). On the other hand, you can deduct expenses that you couldn’t take as an employee.

Harvey I. Bezozi, a CPA and CFP, has worked with small businesses for more than three decades. He shared with us this list of tax deductions that every independent contractor should know about.

1.    First, form an entity
Before he talked about deductions, Bezozi said, “When somebody starts a business, especially if they’re new at it, they’ll usually become a sole proprietor. That’s mistake number one.”

He suggests that you form an LLC, S-corporation, or some other business entity, even if your business is very small. He believes that the tax benefits and the protection from personal liability are worth the extra paperwork.

2.    Use of your car for business
As an employee, your work commute is not tax deductible. “But as an independent contractor, it’s no longer a commute,” Bezozi said.

If you’re going from your office to your client’s office, keep a log and take your mileage off your taxes. You can also deduct transit expenses for travel to a client.

3.    Home office dos and don’ts
“There’s no reason why you can’t deduct that portion of the apartment and/or home expenses, based on square footage” that you use for a home office, Bezozi said. To be deductible, your home office “has to be regular and exclusive use and your principle place of business,” he added.

4.    Equipment purchases
The cost of any electronics you use in your business can be written off on your taxes. If a device has mixed personal and business use, your deduction is proportional. If 30% of your phone usage is for business calls and emails, you can deduct 30% of the cost of the phone and your monthly bill, Bezozi said.

Bezozi also noted that if you’re super conscious of cyber security, you might want to have separate devices for personal and business use, especially if you have employees.

5.    Insurance (and if you don’t have it, you should)
“Generally, you want to have some kind of professional liability insurance,” Bezozi said. “You may want to have cybersecurity insurance. Eventually you want to have disability insurance. That’s something that people don’t think about.” All these insurance premiums are deductible.

If you work alone, your health insurance premiums might be deductible, under the same IRS rules that govern the deductibility of healthcare expenses for individuals.

6.    Retirement savings
If you work as an independent contractor an IRA, SEP IRA, or solo 401(k), will allow you to defer taxes on that income until you retire, Bezozi noted. The amount you contribute comes off your taxable income.

7.    Business travel
“Most people that start out in business, especially in the gig type of economy, are going to be looking to meet people,” Bezozi said. Whether you go across town to a networking event or across the country to a professional conference, your travel expenses can be deductible.

8.    Business meals
“When you meet a client, if you have a meeting over coffee or lunch or a fancy dinner, you can write off the cost of half of that meal,” Bezozi said. The tax rules have changed, however, so you non-meal entertainment expenses are no longer deductible. “If you take a client to a concert, you can no longer deduct that,” he noted.

9.    Training and subscriptions
“Anything to make you better and more knowledgeable in what you do now” is deductible, according to Bezozi. The training must be “something that enhances your ability in your current career but doesn’t get you ready for a different career,” he added. He noted that subscriptions to professional magazines and apps and software that you use in your business are also deductible business expenses.

10.    Client gifts

Gifts to your clients are deductible, up to a point, Bezozi said. If you send a year-end gift basket to an individual client, you can deduct up to $25. If the gift is for the company as a whole (a coffee table book, for example), the limit is higher.

11.    Credit-card interest
If you charge business expenses on a credit card, Bezozi said, “the portion of interest that relates to business expenditures can be deductible.” He noted that there is a limit to the deductibility of this interest, but the limit is high enough that it won’t apply to most independent contractors.

Credit given to:  Laura McCamy  Business Insider   January 10, 2019

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author – Mark C. Bradstreet, CPA

-until next week

Tax Tip of the Week | Estimated Tax Payments January 23, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Deadlines, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Estimated Tax Payments

Clients who are starting a business often ask “Do I need to make estimated payments?”  The answer, as with most tax questions, is “It depends”.  While the IRS, states and cities each have their own set of rules for making estimated payments, this article will discuss only the federal provisions for individuals.

In general, you are required to pay estimated tax if:

1. You expect to owe at least $1,000 after subtracting any withholding and refundable credits you are entitled to receive, and

2. You expect your withholding and refundable credits to be less than the smaller of:

The above percentages are commonly known as safe-harbors.  These percentages may be different for farmers, fisherman, or high income taxpayers.  For farmers and fisherman, if at least two-thirds of your income is from farming or fishing, you can substitute 66 2/3% for the 90% shown above.  For higher income taxpayers, if your adjusted gross income (AGI) is over $150,000, you will need to pay in 110% of the prior year tax instead of 100% as shown above to avoid penalties.  For 2017 and earlier years, AGI was the bottom line on the first page of the Form 1040.  Starting in 2018, AGI is line 7 on the second page of the 1040 form.

If, in addition to your business income, you also receive salaries and wages, you may be able to avoid paying estimates by having your employer bump up your withholding.  We often see higher income W-2 earners owing with their tax returns because they do not have enough tax withheld.  In these cases, if nothing is done to increase withholding, and no estimates are paid, the requirements above can cause a penalty on the return, even though the taxpayer has no other outside income.

Another safe-harbor that exists stems from having no tax liability for the prior year.  In that case, you are not required to make estimated payments for the current year.  However, if you make no estimated payments, you need to be prepared to pay any balance due when your returns are filed, plus you will owe the first estimate that will be due for the next year, both of which will be due April 15th.  So plan ahead!

If you do find yourself in the position of having to make estimated payments, the due dates are on the 15th of April, June, September and January, unless weekends come into play, in which case, they are due the following Monday.  Payments can be made in several ways including online at IRS.gov/payments by using a debit or credit card, electronic funds withdrawal, or through the electronic federal tax payments system, known as EFTPS (you must have an account set up for this one).  You can also pay by phone or through a mobile device by downloading the IRS2Go app.  And yes, you can still pay the old-fashioned way by sending in a payment voucher, Form 1040-ES, with a check or money order payable to U.S. Treasury.

For more information, please see your tax advisor, or go to the IRS website at www.IRS.gov.  Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. We may be reached in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.

This week’s author – Norman S. Hicks, CPA

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | Students Get Help From Judges January 2, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, tax changes, Tax Deadlines, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Students Get Help From Judges

To give you an idea of the pervasiveness of this issue, student loan debt “has eclipsed credit cards as the largest source of consumer debt after mortgages.”  Please read the write-up below for potential relief for some former students.

Mark Bradstreet, CPA

“More bankruptcy judges are throwing lifelines to people struggling to repay their student loans after decades of refusing to consider any sort of relief.

In interviews with the Wall Street Journal, more than 50 current and former bankruptcy judges, frustrated at seeing borrowers leave federal courtrooms with six-figure debts, say they or their colleagues are more open to chipping away at the decades-old guidelines that determine how such debt is treated.

“If the law’s not going to be improved by Congress, we have to help these young people who are drowning in student loan debt, said U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge John Waites in South Carolina.

Outright cancellations remain rare, but judges said they have other tools at their disposal, including asking lawyers to represent borrowers for nothing. The lawsuits can cost $3,000 to $10,000 and take years.

Other judges are embracing debt-relief techniques that don’t fully erase student loans but make repayment more affordable by, for instance, canceling future related tax bills. The popularity of these relief strategies could get a boost from a panel of professors, judges and advocates who are studying failures in consumer bankruptcy law and plan to release a report next year.

Hundreds of thousands carry student debt in the U.S. – the total has more than doubled over the past decade to $1.4 trillion – nearly all backed by the federal government. It has eclipsed credit cards as the largest source of consumer debt after mortgages. Almost every other type can be extinguished in bankruptcy, but standards made college debt untouchable. Borrowers typically must repay student loans over their lifetime, even those facing extreme financial hardship.

In March, Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell said he would be “at a loss to explain” why student loans can’t be cancelled like other debt. The Trump administration is considering whether to fight cancellation requests less aggressively.

Consumer bankruptcy lawyers are starting to notice that judges are being more flexible. One Las Vegas law firm recently filed the first cancellation request in its 14-year history after hearing a judge at a conference voice concern over student loans. Other lawyers said growing sympathy amounts to judges making lenders more willing to reach resolutions in court.

“I’m getting really good results with settlements these days,” said Chicago lawyer David Leibowitz. “I’m not the only one.”

Rules governing how student debt is handled in bankruptcy are made by Congress and by judges who issue influential rulings. Several bills in Congress that would erase student-loan debt in bankruptcy have stalled in recent years.

Last year in Philadelphia, U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Eric Frank cancelled a single mother’s $30,000 in student loans. Opposing lawyers from the U.S. Department of Education said the borrower needed to prove her hardship would persist 25 years. Judge Frank ruled that the relevant window was five years.

An appeals court over-turned his ruling, but his decision inspired a Tacoma, Wash., judge in December to cancel a portion of another borrower’s loans.

Such rulings are rare because few troubled borrowers attempt to cancel their student loans, because of the historically slim chances of victory.

Some bankruptcy judges criticize colleagues for re-interpreting well-settled law on student loans. “My view is, if the law is clear, follow it,” said retired California judge Peter Bowie.

The push to rethink the legal standard on student-loan debt is bipartisan. Judges interviewed by the Wall Street Journal were appointed during both Republican and Democratic administrations, though bankruptcy judges are appointed by appeals court judges, not the president.

Before 1976, laws allowed borrowers to do away with student-loan debt in bankruptcy. Congress, out of concern that the new graduates would take too much advantage of that option, made a new rule: Borrowers could cancel student loan debt after only five years of payments. Judges could grant exceptions if borrowers showed that repaying would cause “undue hardship.”

Congress didn’t define “undue hardship” so the task of doing so fell to federal judges. When Marie Brunner, a 1982 graduate of a master’s program in social work tried to cancel her loans in bankruptcy, a New York judge in 1985 said she had to show three things: she struggled financially, her struggles would continue and that she had made a good faith effort to repay. She lost.

That list still serves as a baseline for hardship in circuit courts that control the rules in most states.  Some appeals courts set even higher bench-marks, with one, for instance, saying borrowers must face a “certainty of hopelessness.”

In 1998 Congress said any borrower trying to cancel any federal student loans must prove “undue hardship,” like Ms. Brunner. Congress gave private student loans the same protection in 2005.

Some of the country’s bankruptcy judges are starting to argue that the prevailing legal standard is unintentionally harsh and wasn’t meant for adults still on the hook for student-loan debt years after college.

Judge Frank Bailey in Boston made that argument in an April ruling wiping out $50,000 in student loans for a 39-year-old man whose health ailments prevent him from working.

Some judges, including U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Michael Keplan in Trenton, N.J., said they are looking for ways to be more forgiving after seeing their own adult children borrow heavily for their education. Other judges grew concerned after talking to their law clerks. The typical law-school student takes out $119,000 in loans.

Two judges said they regret their rulings against borrowers more than a decade ago.

Kansas judge Dale Somers said he worked particularly hard to justify the reasoning in a December 2016 ruling that cancelled more than $230,000 in interest that built up on a couple’s student loans from the 1980s. They left bankruptcy owing $78,000.

Alabama judge William Sawyer declared that student loans had become “a life sentence” in a 2015 decision cancelling a $112,000 student loan debt for high school science teacher Alexandra Conniff, a single mother of two teen boys whose yearly income is $59,400.”

Credit given to Katherine Stech (Wall Street Journal)

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author – Mark C. Bradstreet, CPA

-until next week

Happy Holidays & Happy New Year! December 26, 2018

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Tax Deadlines, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Uncategorized , add a comment

Happy Holidays & Happy New Year!

And get ready for the tax filing season.

Hopefully, you followed some of the suggestions outlined in Publication 552 to organize your records. If you did, great! This will make filing your tax returns a lot easier this year. It also means that you and your tax advisor can spend more time on tax and financial planning issues for 2019 vs. looking back to 2018.

This week we will look at some of the more common forms that you should be watching for in the coming weeks and months:

W-2:    Employers should mail these by 1/31/19. If you have moved during the year, make sure former employers are aware of your new address. Some employers provide W-2’s to their employees via a website. Be sure to login and print out your W-2 after it is available.

W-2G:    Casinos, Lottery Commissions and other gambling entities should mail these by 1/31/19 if you have gambling winnings above a certain threshold. Note: Some casinos will issue you a W-2G at the time you win a jackpot. Make sure you have saved those throughout the year.

1096:    Compilation sheet that shows the totals of the information returns that you are physically mailing to the IRS.The check box for Form 1099-H was removed from line 6, while a check box for Form 1098-Q was added to line 6.The spacing for all check boxes on line 6 was expanded.The amounts reported in Box 13 of Form 1099-INT should now be included in box 5 of Form 1096 when filing Form 1099-INT to the IRS.

1098-C:    You might receive this form if you made contributions of motor vehicles, boats, or airplanes to a qualified charitable organization. A donee organization must file a separate Form 1098-C with the IRS for each contribution of a qualified vehicle that has a claimed value of more than $500. All filers of this form may truncate a donor’s identification number (social security number, individual taxpayer identification number, adoption taxpayer identification number, or employer identification number), on written acknowledgements. Truncation is not allowed, however, on any documents the filer files with the IRS.

1099-MISC:   This form reports the total paid during the year to a single person or entity for services provided. Certain Medicaid waiver payments may be excludable from the income as difficulty of care payments. A new check box was added to this form to identify a foreign financial institution filing this form to satisfy its Chapter 4 reporting requirement.

1099-INT:    This form is used to report interest income paid by banks and other financial institutions. Box 13 was added to report bond premium on tax-exempt bonds. All later boxes were renumbered. A new check box was added to this form to identify a foreign financial institution filing this form to satisfy its Chapter 4 reporting requirement.

1099-DIV:    This form is issued to those who have received dividends from stocks. A new check box was added to this form to identify a foreign financial institution filing this form to satisfy its Chapter 4 reporting requirement.

1099-B:     This form is issued by a broker or barter exchange that summarizes the proceeds of sales transactions. For a sale of a debt instrument that is a wash sale and has accrued market discount, a code “W” should be displayed in box 1f and the amount of the wash sale loss disallowed in box 1g.

1099-K:    This form is given to those merchants accepting payment card transactions. Completion of box 1b (Card Not Present transactions) is now mandatory.

K-1s:    If you are a partner, member or shareholder in a partnership or S corporation, your income and expenses will be reported to you on a K-1. The tax returns for these entities are not due until 3/15/19 (if they have a calendar-year accounting). Sometimes, you may not receive a K-1 until shortly after the entity’s tax return is filed in March.

If you are a beneficiary of an estate or trust, your share of the income and expenses for the year will also be reported on a K-1. These returns will be due 4/15/19 so you might not receive your K-1 before the due date of your Form 1040.

NOTE:  Many times corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts will put their tax returns on extension. If they do, the due date of the return is not until 9/16/19 or later. We often see client’s receiving K-1s in the third week of September.

If you receive, or expect to receive, a K-1 it is best if you place your personal return on extension. It is a lot easier to extend your return then it is to amend your return after receiving a K-1 later in the year.

1098:    This form is sent by banks or other lenders to provide the amount of mortgage interest paid on mortgage loans. The form might also show real estate taxes paid and other useful information related to the loan.

1098-T:    This form is provided by educational institutions and shows the amounts paid or billed for tuition, scholarships received, and other educational information. These amounts are needed to calculate educational credits that may be taken on your returns.

So start watching your mailbox and put all of these statements you receive in that new file you created!

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

–until next week

Tax Tip of the Week | Keep your Tax Returns Forever? October 24, 2018

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Tax Deadlines, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week
October 24, 2018

One of our more commonly asked questions is, how long do I have to keep my income tax returns?

Maybe, the key words in this question are “have to.” For practically all intents and purposes “have to” refers to the requirement of retaining three (3) years after filing them. The reasoning is that you and the IRS only have three (3) years to amend or change a return (typical statute of limitations).

BUT, there are some notable exceptions to the three (3) year rule:

(1) The IRS may go back six (6) years when a significant income amount (25%) has been omitted from an income tax return. They can also go back indefinitely if the IRS proves you filed a fraudulent tax return.

(2) What about the situation where the IRS says you failed to file a return? Let’s say the IRS asks for a return from four (4) years ago. Oops – you just shredded that one since you were diligently following the three (3) year rule. Who knows why the IRS did not receive the return. Maybe your neighbor hijacked it from your mailbox, possibly your postal carrier lost it or the IRS Center received it but simply missed processing it because the return was attached to another return and overlooked. It matters not, why the return was not shown as received by the IRS, because the burden is yours to prove the return was filed. Now you have to resurrect your records, prepare and file the tax return again or be classified forever and ever as a “non-filer.”

Bob Carlson, editor of Retirement Watch, contends that keeping your tax returns indefinitely may well be worth the hassle. “Once you show a return was filed, the statute of limitations is three (3) years, unless the fraud or six (6) year exceptions apply. With very few exceptions, the IRS won’t be able to question the details of the (older) returns. You can shred and dispose of those supporting records and keep a copy of the return.”

It may well be worth the hassle to store these old returns in an effort to gain just a little peace of mind.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author – Mark C Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 471 | Ohio Worker’s Compensation August 1, 2018

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Deadlines, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Aug 1, 2018 | No. 471 | Ohio Worker’s Compensation

To Start: Having a business in Ohio requires you to obtain Worker’s Compensation insurance for your employees and possibly your subcontractors. The application, payments and returns are all filed through the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (OBWC) website at https://www.bwc.ohio.gov.

For new employers an application form U-3 requires a $120 non-refundable application fee. Based on your estimated payroll for the following 12 months and the type of work that your employees do (manual number), OBWC will set your annual fee. It is very important that you are specific in the type of work being done and the equipment being used to accurately assign the manual numbers and rates.

Reporting & Paying: Depending on the amount set for your annual fee, you will either need to pay the entire amount up front or it will be broken down into 6 equal payments. You can make these payments online or pay the installments through the mail. Once a year, you can elect to make your 6 payments monthly, quarterly or annually. BWC runs on a fiscal year of July 1- June 30. A true-up report is due annually on August 15 and is required to be filed on their website reporting the actual payroll for the prior fiscal year. Depending on the actual versus the estimated, either an overpayment will be refunded or a balance will be due. If you have a significant increase in your payroll, you may want to increase your payments during the year so that you don’t owe a large sum with the true up.

Rebates: In 2018 OBWC is issuing rebates for the 2016-2017 fiscal year of 85% of the premiums paid for that year. Checks were mailed out in July. Rebates have also been issued in 3 of the past 4 years.

Lowering your rates:  There are various methods to help lower your rates including: belonging to a group, participating in safety programs, i.e. Policy Activity Rebate (PAR) and training through Better You, Better Ohio! as well as other rating programs. Various rules apply to these, including claim history and some may not be combined.

Let us help answer any of your questions about Workers’ Compensation or other tax matters.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We may be reached in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

This week’s author – Linda J. Johannes, CPA

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 467 | Hmmm…Behind on Filing Your Income Tax Returns and/or Paying Your Income Taxes? July 4, 2018

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Tax Deadlines, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | July 4, 2018 | No. 467 | Hmmm…Behind on Filing Your Income Tax Returns and/or Paying Your Income Taxes?

You can run but you can’t hide. Delinquent tax return filing or failure to pay your income taxes is not a problem that ever goes away. In fact, the longer you wait to address this problem, the worse it becomes.

The highlights that follow are specific to the Internal Revenue Service. Other taxing entities have their own rules and regulations for past due returns and past due tax balances.

The “failure to file” IRS penalty is typically 5% per month and the “failure to pay” IRS penalty is an additional 5% per month. These two penalties may each be up to 25% of your unpaid taxes. To add insult to injury, interest expense to the IRS also accrues until the balance is paid in full.

The IRS may waive these penalties if you have reasonable cause for not filing your return or paying your taxes. Criminal charges may be sought against a taxpayer if the IRS believes you are evading taxes.

Some people won’t file a return with a balance due if funds are lacking to pay the IRS. In these cases, one may be in a better position to file the return without payment to avoid the “failure to file” penalty.  In this scenario, the “failure to pay” penalty would be the only penalty assessed, along with the interest expense of course.

If paying your return balance is not an option, an installment agreement may be applied for. If eligible, this agreement sets-up a monthly payment. Warning: These installment agreements are typically null and void if a payment is missed.

Another option, although far from easy to obtain, is to request an “offer in compromise.” This permits you to pay, under certain conditions, less then the full overdue balance.

Another possibility exists, if the IRS agrees you cannot pay your past due balance and your living expenses, your account may be moved to “currently not collectible.” Usually, in this situation, the IRS collection efforts will ratchet down. However, the debt remains with penalties and interest continuing to grow.

The moral of the story is not to ignore any IRS correspondence (or any tax correspondence for that matter) and be proactive in dealing with it. Your tax professional can help you come up with a workable plan. They have been down this road before and most likely will have a working rapport with the tax agency in question.

Credit to Sarah Skidmire Sell, The Associated Press, Sunday April 29, 2018, Dayton Daily News

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We may be reached in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

This week’s author – Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 464 | Ohio’s Commercial Activity Tax (CAT) – General Information June 13, 2018

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Tax Deadlines, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | June 13, 2018 | No. 464 | Ohio’s Commercial Activity Tax (CAT) – General Information

The commercial activity tax (CAT) was enacted in Ohio House Bill 66 and first applied to taxable gross receipts received on and after July 1, 2005. The CAT is a successor tax to Ohio’s general business property and corporate franchise taxes, both of which were phased out. The CAT is an annual privilege tax measured by gross receipts on business activities in Ohio. This tax applies to all types of businesses: e.g., retailers, service providers (such as lawyers, accountants, and doctors), manufacturers, and other types of businesses including rentals. The CAT also applies whether the business is located in Ohio or is located outside of Ohio if the taxpayer has enough business contacts with this state. The CAT applies to all entities regardless of form, (e.g., sole proprietorships, partnerships, LLCs, and all types of corporations). A person with taxable gross receipts of more than $150,000 per calendar year is subject to this tax.

Taxable Gross Receipts – Gross receipts subject to CAT include most business types of receipts. Some examples of receipts that are not subject to the CAT include interest, dividends, capital gains, wages and gifts. Receipts from sales to out-of-state purchasers are not subject to the CAT.

Registration – Taxpayers having over $150,000 in gross receipts from sales to customers in Ohio for the calendar year are required to file returns for the CAT. In order to file returns, a taxpayer must first register for the CAT with the Ohio Department of Taxation.

Annual and Quarterly Filers – Annual CAT taxpayers (those taxpayers with taxable gross receipts between $150,000 and $1 million in a calendar year) must pay an annual minimum tax. The annual minimum tax is due on May 10th of the current tax year.

Taxpayers with annual taxable gross receipts in excess of $1 million must file returns on a quarterly basis. Quarterly taxpayers pay a rate component for taxable gross receipts in excess of $1 million. The annual minimum tax is paid with the filing of the first quarter return, which is due on May 10th.

Consolidated Elected Taxpayer Groups and Combined Taxpayer Groups – A consolidated elected taxpayer group is a taxpayer that has elected to file as a group including all entities that have either 50 percent or more common ownership or 80 percent or more common ownership. A major benefit of making this election is that receipts received between members of the group may be excluded from the taxable gross receipts of the group. This election is binding for eight calendar quarters.

Annual Minimum Tax –   The annual minimum tax is calculated as follows:
•    $150 for taxpayers with taxable gross receipts of $1 million or less in the previous calendar year;
•    $800 for taxpayers with taxable gross receipts between $1 million and $2 million;
•    $2,100 for taxpayers with taxable gross receipts between $2 million and $4 million; or
•    $2,600 for taxpayers with more than $4 million in taxable gross receipts in the previous calendar year.

Tax Credits – Some credits that taxpayers can claim against the CAT include:
•    the nonrefundable jobs retention credit;
•    the nonrefundable credit for qualified research expenses, or, the nonrefundable credit for a borrower’s qualified research and development loan payments;
•    the refundable motion picture production credit;
•    the refundable jobs creation credit, or the refundable job retention credit;
•    the Ohio historic preservation tax credit (on a temporary basis).

Some Issues We’ve Seen – From the beginning of enactment, and even through the present, many taxpayers are simply unaware that the tax exists, or that they are subject to it. Another issue is that some taxpayers file CAT returns that include all gross receipts and not just those to Ohio customers. And some do not take advantage of credits that can be applied to the tax. Also, we have seen many cases where the taxpayer computes the tax, then goes online and makes the payment, but never files the return. And, it usually takes Ohio over a year to send out a notice for the unfiled return, and by then, they have sent the taxpayer to collections, and filed liens. And finally, we have noticed that audits in this area are on the rise.

As you can see, this simple tax is not always so simple.

Note: most of this information is available on the Ohio Department of Taxation’s website.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We may be reached in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

This week’s author – Norman S. Hicks, CPA

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 439 | Special Holiday Edition December 20, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Deadlines, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Dec 20, 2017 | No. 439 | Special Holiday Edition…

Enjoy the Holidays!

We are going to take a break from our tax and business tips this week. Instead, the family of Bradstreet & Company would like to wish you and your family the most joyous holiday season and best wishes for 2018.

We hope you enjoy the Tax Tip of The Week. As always, your topic suggestions and questions are always appreciated.

Is the Tax Tip of the Week real?
While your kids are questioning if Santa is real, we continue to receive some interesting feedback that some of you don’t realize this is really Bradstreet CPAs reaching out each week (… some suspect this is a “packaged” communication to which we add our logo.) Well, rest assured it’s us and we love to hear from you.

Enjoy the week and, “Yes Virgina, there is a Santa Claus”.

Wishing you all great things,

The Staff at Bradstreet & Company

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

…until next week.