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Tax Tip of the Week | No. 421 | The Most Overlooked Business Deduction August 23, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Aug 23, 2017 | No. 421 | The Most Overlooked Business Deduction

Way back in 2004 Congress added a new Internal Revenue Code Section that allows a deduction to businesses just for operating a business. There is no requirement to buy anything, there is no requirement to spend anything, and there is no requirement to borrow anything. This deduction is available to sole proprietors, farmers, LLC’s, S corporations and C Corporations, and is available just for “doing what you are doing”. Yes, it is a true made-up deduction, just like non-cash charity deductions, only this one is legal! We call this deduction the Domestic Production Activities Deduction (DPAD), but the IRS calls it the manufacturer’s and producer’s deduction.

The deduction is 9% of the lesser of net income or qualified production income (the deduction is limited to 50% of wages). So nearly any business with qualified production income is able to take an additional 9% deduction just for producing a product. This means that a farmer gets a 9% of net income deduction without spending any more money. It means machine shop clients, builders, developers, manufacturers, print shop operators and many more business owners will get this deduction as well.

The deduction is aimed at companies that produce a tangible product in the United States, and that employ workers to do so. And yes, it is 9% of the profit! The owner that qualifies and makes $100,000 will only pay tax on $91,000 if you remember this deduction.

The deduction is taken on IRS Form 8903, which has been unchanged for many years. It is taken directly on the applicable schedule C or F, or as a flow through item on a K-1 for partnerships, LLCs and S corporations.

The deduction is available to taxpayers whose activities are the manufacture, production or growth of items they sell, which include:

•    The sale of tangible personal property
•    The sale of computer software (but not online services)
•    The sale of recordings, books, tapes, CD’s and DVD’s
•    Business interruption proceeds and payments not to produce
•    Farming, raising animals and fishing
•    Printing (including advertising sales in printed publications)
•    Most new construction and renovation.

Activities that do not qualify for the deduction include most service businesses and most grocery stores and restaurants unless the restaurant packages and sells products that it produced itself.

If you own a business, give us a call to make sure you are not missing out on this important deduction.

An upcoming event that would qualify for a personal charitable deduction would be attending the STEMM Charity Gala presented by the Dayton Defense Education Foundation. The Gala takes place on 9/23/17, more information and event registration can be found by clicking the link below:

http://www.daytondefense.org/home/events.html#id=146&cid=667&wid=401&type=Cal

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 419 | You Make The Call – Head of Household August 9, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Aug 9, 2017 | No. 419 | You Make The Call – Head of Household

You Make the Call is a monthly format of questions and answers our office faces on a daily basis.  We hope you will find these tips to be a quick and fun read.

QUESTION: The taxpayer’s mother lives in her home and she has provided care for her for several years. Her mother’s only income is from social security. The taxpayer pays over half of the living expenses for her mother, therefore she is her dependent. If her mother dies in January, can the taxpayer still claim head of household in the year of death?

ANSWER: Yes, as long as the taxpayer is eligible to claim her mother as a dependent. For head of household purposes, “The taxpayer and such other person must occupy the household for the entire taxable year of the taxpayer. However, the fact that such other person is born or dies within the taxable year will not prevent the taxpayer from qualifying as a head of household if the household constitutes the principal place of abode of such other person for the remaining or preceding part of such taxable year”. There is a similar explanation for dependency purposes that states, “The fact that the dependent dies during the year shall not deprive the taxpayer of the deduction if the dependent lived in the household for the entire part of the year preceding his death.”

Please note that the question and answer provided does not take into account all options or circumstances possible.  Call us if you find yourself in a similar situation.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 417 | Five Home Office Deduction Mistakes July 26, 2017

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Tax Tip of the Week | July 26, 2017 | No. 417 | Five Home Office Deduction Mistakes

Here are five common mistakes of those who deduct home office expenses.

1. Not taking it. Some believe the home office deduction is too complicated, while others believe taking the deduction increases your chance of being audited.

2. Not exclusive or regular. The space you use must be used exclusively and regularly for your business.

• Exclusively: Your home office cannot be used for another purpose.

• Regularly: It should be the primary place for conducting regular business activities, such as recordkeeping and ordering.

3. Mixing up your other work. If you are an employee for someone else in addition to running your own business, be careful in using your home office to do work for your employer. Generally, IRS rules state you can only use a home office deduction as an employee if your employer doesn’t provide you with a local office.

4. The recapture problem. When selling your home you will need to account for any home office depreciation. This depreciation recapture rule creates a possible tax liability for many unsuspecting home office users.

5. Not getting help. The home office deduction can be tricky, so ask for help, especially if you fall under one of these cases.

As always it is a good idea to call before considering any deductions.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.
Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 416 | Reap the Benefits of Hiring Your Child for the Summer July 19, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | July 19, 2017 | No. 416 | Reap the Benefits of Hiring Your Child for the Summer

Hiring your children to work in your business can be a win-win situation for everyone. Your kids will earn money, gain real-life experience in the workplace, and learn what you do every day. And you will reap a few tax benefits in the process. The following guidelines will help you determine if the arrangement will work in your situation.

• Make sure your child works a real job that he or she can reasonably handle, no matter how basic or simple. Consider tasks like office filing, packing orders, or customer service.

• Treat your child like any other employee. Expect regular hours and appropriate behavior. If you are lenient with your child, you risk upsetting other employees.

• To avoid questions from the IRS, make sure the pay is reasonable for the duties performed. It’s not a bad idea to prepare a written job description for your files. Include a W-2 at year-end.

• Record hours worked just as you would for any employee. If possible, pay your child using the normal payroll system and procedures your other employees use.

• Hiring your children works best if you are a sole proprietor. It has additional tax benefits not  available if your business is organized as a C corporation or an S corporation.

If you have questions, give us a call. Together we can determine if hiring your child is the right course of action for your business and family.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.
Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 414 | You Make The Call – EITC July 5, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | July 5, 2017 | No. 414 | You Make The Call – EITC

You Make the Call is a monthly format of questions and answers our office faces on a daily basis.  We hope you will find these tips to be a quick and fun read.

QUESTION: Jamie and Claire are married and have total earned income of $40,000. They have a daughter, Bree, age 22 who graduated from college in May. After graduation, Bree moved back home with her parents and worked. She lived at home from June until December and earned $22,000.

Jamie and Claire would like to know if they are still eligible for the earned income tax credit (EITC) using Bree as a qualifying child for EITC purposes, and Bree would like to know if she may claim her own exemption when preparing her tax return this year.

ANSWER: Yes and yes. Under the qualifying child rules for purposes of dependency, Bree meets all the requirements except for support. Because she earns $22,000, she provides more than half of her own support. Therefore, Jamie and Claire may not claim her as a dependent. However, for EITC purposes because all the dependency tests are met, except for support, she is still a qualifying child for EITC. Therefore, Jamie and Claire may still receive EITC using Bree as a qualifying child for EITC purposes.

Additionally, because Bree is no longer a qualifying child for dependency purposes, she may claim her own exemption when she files her return.

Please note that the question and answer provided does not take into account all options or circumstances possible.  Call us if you find yourself in a similar situation.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.
Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 413 | Learning From Prince’s $250 Million Mistake June 28, 2017

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Tax Tip of the Week | June 28, 2017 | No. 413 | Learning From Prince’s $250 Million Mistake

Finally, over a year after the date of his death, a judge confirmed Prince’s six siblings to be his rightful heirs – after more than 45 people had come forward claiming to be his wife, children, siblings or other relatives.

Last year, the legendary musician passed away, leaving behind not only a legacy of unparalleled music, but also a $250 million fortune – with no will or estate plan to be found. With the long-anticipated announcement that his siblings will inherit his fortune, we’re reminded again of the importance of planning ahead and hiring trusted experts to carry out your wishes.

Whether you have people clamoring after your money or not, it’s important to consider hiring an expert to sort through the, at times, very complicated process of estate planning. There are DIY websites and software packages that may seem attractive (and cheap!), but more often than not, you get what you pay for. More complicated life situations, such as children from a prior marriage, children with special needs, or capital gains from property appreciation, require the hands-on insight of an expert.

It is important to have an unbiased third party look over your documents. Even U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, who died in 1995, should have relied on estate planning experts to prepare his estate plan – but instead he took it upon himself, and his family paid over $450,000 in taxes because of his errors.

To be better prepared than Prince and Chief Justice Burger, seek out the assistance of an attorney or a CPA to draft a will and do estate planning, respectively. An attorney will help you navigate a will, and a CPA is best positioned to help with more complicated estate planning.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.
Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 412 | Social Security Earnings Amount Increases June 21, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | June 21, 2017 | No. 412 | Social Security Earnings Amount Increases

For 2015-2016, the maximum wage amount subject to social security tax was $118,500.  For 2017, the maximum wage amount subject to social security withholding will be $127,200.

If you are an employee, this will be the wage amount shown in Box 3 of your W-2.

If you are self-employed, you will be subject to social security tax up to $127,200 of your net business income.

There remains no earnings limit subject to Medicare tax withholdings.  Any earnings for employees over $127,200 will still be subject to a 1.45% Medicare tax (2.90% Medicare tax if self-employed).

Especially for those who are self-employed, you may need to adjust your quarterly estimated payments.  As always, give us a call if you have any questions.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.
Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 410 | You Make The Call – Home Basis June 7, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | June 7, 2017 | No. 410 | You Make The Call – Home Basis

You Make the Call is a monthly format of questions and answers our office faces on a daily basis.  We hope you will find these tips to be a quick and fun read.

QUESTION: Albert walks into our office and tells us that he bought a house from his parents. The house is worth $350,000, but his parents only made him pay $200,000. His parents paid $100,000 for this house a few years ago. After making several improvements, their adjusted basis in the home was $150,000 when they sold it to Albert. He did not assume any mortgages on the home. What is Albert’s basis in the home?

ANSWER: This is a part gift, part sale. Albert’s parents sold it for $200,000, and they gave him a gift of $150,000 ($350,000 FMV (fair market value) less $200,000 sales price). In a part gift, part sale, Albert’s basis is the greater of the amount he paid for it ($200,000), or his parent’s adjusted basis in the home ($150,000) at the time of transfer. Thus, his basis is $200,000.

Please note that the question and answer provided does not take into account all options or circumstances possible.  Call us if you find yourself in a similar situation.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.
Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 403 | Is it a Business or a Hobby? April 19, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | April 19, 2017 | No. 403 | Is it a Business or a Hobby?

An issue we deal with all the time with our client’s is to help them distinguish if an activity is a Business or a Hobby. The difference is, legitimate business losses are potentially fully deductible.  If the activity is deemed to be a hobby by the IRS, then you can only deduct legitimate hobby expense up to the amount of your hobby income.

Sometimes it is hard to make a determination.  Activities related to horse racing, horse shows, auto racing or auto restoration draw particular scrutiny by the IRS.

The following is a nine part test the IRS considers in deciding whether a taxpayer is running a business genuinely designed to make money or merely a hobby:

1.    You carry on the activity in a businesslike manner.

2.    The time and effort you put into the activity indicate you intend to make it profitable.

3.    You depend on the income for your livelihood.

4.    Your losses are due to circumstances beyond your control (or are normal in the startup phase of your type of business).

5.    You change your methods of operation in an attempt to improve profitability.

6.    You (or your advisers) have the knowledge needed to carry on the activity as a successful business.

7.    You were successful in making a profit in similar activities in the past.

8.    The activity makes a profit in some years (The guideline is profitable 3 out of the last 5 years).

9.    You can expect to make a future profit from the appreciation of the assets used in the activity.

As usual, when considering this and other tax situations it comes down to making sure it passes the “Smell Test”.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.

Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 401 | Tax Rules When You Sell Your Home April 5, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | April 5, 2017 | No. 401 | Tax Rules When You Sell Your Home

The tax rules regarding the sale of your primary residence have been the same for many years, however, a lot of people still don’t understand the tax implications of selling their home. The following is a brief summary of what you need to know:

Taxpayers can exclude up to $250,000 ($500,000 if married) of gain on the sale of a home if all three of the following are satisfied:
1) The taxpayer owned the home for at least two years during the 5-year period ending on the date of sale,
2) The taxpayer used the home as a principal residence for at least two years during the 5-year period ending on the date of sale, and
3) The taxpayer did not exclude gain from the sale of another home during the 2-year period ending on the date of sale.

Reduced exclusion. If the taxpayer does not meet the 2-year ownership and use tests, or has already excluded gain from the sale of another home during the 2-year period prior to the sale of a current home, the taxpayer may qualify for a reduced exclusion if the primary reason for the sale is due to:
1) A change in place of employment,
2) Health reasons,
3) Unforeseen circumstances

Examples of unforeseen circumstances that may qualify for a reduced exclusion include:
• Involuntary conversion of home.
• Natural or man-made disasters, acts of war, or terrorism.
• Death.
• Unemployment.
• Change of employment resulting in an inability to pay reasonable basic living expenses.
• Divorce or legal separation.
• Multiple births resulting from the same pregnancy.
• Any other event the IRS determines to be an unforeseen circumstance.

In a recent IRS Letter Ruling, the taxpayers were married and had one child when they purchased their two bedroom condominium. One bedroom was used as the child’s bedroom, the husband’s office in home, and as a guest room. After the purchase of this residence, the wife became pregnant and gave birth to a second child. The taxpayers sold their residence so that they could move to a larger home to accommodate their growing family.

The IRS concluded that the occurrence of unforeseen circumstances was the primary reason for the sale and that the suitability of their residence as a principal residence materially changed. Accordingly, the gain on the sale of the residence, which the taxpayers owned and used as a principal residence for less than two of the preceding five years, qualified for the reduced maximum exclusion.

As always, let us know if you have any questions.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504.  Or visit our website.
Rick Prewitt – the guy behind TTW

…until next week.