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Working Remotely? Watch Out for Unintended Tax Consequences! July 1, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : COVID, COVID-19, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Rules, Tax Tip, Taxes, Taxes, Uncategorized , trackback

  Typically, you are taxed by the location of your physical presence (this is changing now to some degree to better deal with the complexities of the internet).  For example, Ohio cities tax you first where you work and then next where you live.  That is to say that you won’t owe any city tax for your residence city if your workplace is located in a city whose tax rate is equal to or higher than the city where you live.  This is true only if your resident city allows a full tax credit for the city taxes paid where you work and its tax rate is equal to or less than your work city.  Not too long ago, almost all cities allowed a full credit for the tax paid to the city where you are employed.  But this full tax offset is becoming more of a rarity the last few years as city budgets continue to become more and more strained. These deficit situations for state and local governments won’t become any better with the current pandemic placing even greater demands on city finances.  

    For all intents and purposes, your state income tax model differs little from that of the cities.  It is not unlikely to find yourself double taxed by cities AND states.

    Now having attempted to make a long story short and leaving out the numerous tax exceptions for the general tax rules for cities and states as mentioned above; and, all the while assuming you have a good handle on how your state and local taxes should currently be filed, let’s throw you a curve ball.  Let’s presume you are now working from home.  And, your home is in a different city or even a different state than where you work.  What if you are working half the week at home and the rest of the week at work?  All of a sudden, a tax nightmare has developed.  

    I wish I had the silver bullet to answer my own questions.  Perhaps, the cities and states will pass legislation to overcome these added complexities resulting from the pandemic.  But I doubt it.  In the meantime, we better become accustomed to even more tax correspondence from cities and states.  None of them are going to roll-over in their efforts to collect all the monies that they can.  It is always a mystery to me why they would spend megabucks and create huge amounts of ill will in the community all in an effort to collect a nominal amount of taxes.  But some things never change.

This week’s Author – Mark Bradstreet

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

– until next week.

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