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Your Age-by-Age Checklist to Prepare for Retirement Conversations June 24, 2020

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Retirement, Tax Tip, Taxes , trackback

June 24, 2020

The question isn’t at what age I want to retire, it’s at what income.                      -George Foreman

Never have times been so interesting. Never has change occurred so fast.  We all know that time moves faster as we grow older.  However, it may not make sense to bend over backwards in an effort to fund your retirement at a young age.  But neither may it be ignored completely either.  
                           -Mark Bradstreet

What should you and your loved ones be doing to prepare for a retirement when and how you want? While the answer partially depends on whether your own personal finish line is just around the corner or decades away, there’s one thing that everyone should be doing, no matter your age: talking.

It’s important to have conversations about retirement planning early and often, but not everyone knows what to talk about or how to get started. These age-based guidelines can serve as discussion points with your loved ones to make sure you’re on track for the retirement you want.

Preparing for retirement in your 30’s

• Don’t let student loans prevent you from saving for retirement. It’s usually a mistake to think that student loan debt should be fully paid off before putting aside money for retirement. Your retirement savings need time to grow so you can achieve your goals, and investing early will pay off in the long run — even if you can’t save as much as you’d like.  The right balance will likely include payments toward both goals, with the exact amounts depending on factors like interest rates and expected returns. 

• Make sure you’re maxing out your company’s 401(k) matching contributions. Employers often match up to a certain amount of your contributions; it’s essentially free money that you could be taking advantage of! 

• Don’t leave your job without taking vesting into consideration. Many companies tie their retirement contributions to a requirement that you stay with the company for a minimum amount of time, known as the vesting period. If you leave before the allotted period of time, be aware of the financial repercussions. 

• Revisit your 401(k) contributions each time you get a raise or promotion. If you’ve set up automatic contributions, it’s important that you don’t fall into the trap of sticking to those levels indefinitely.

• Understand the power of compounding returns. The earlier you begin investing, the more time your money will have to grow. Don’t delay. 

Preparing for your retirement in your 40’s

• Prioritize paying down your high-interest debt. Whether you have credit card debt, a car loan or a home mortgage, paying interest can eat away at your ability to save money for retirement. Prioritize your highest interest debt first and work your way down until you’re debt free. 

• Don’t fall behind. Your 40’s can be a stressful time financially. Many people in today’s “sandwich generation” are squeezed by the needs of children getting ready for college and elderly parents with dwindling reserves. Try to at least keep pace with your previous level of retirement savings. 

• Start running the numbers. Making some quick calculations can help show you where different savings scenarios are likely to lead you. If you’re not sure where to start, try Lincoln Financial’s retirement calculators.

• Talk to a financial advisor to make sure you’re on the right track. “Meeting with a financial advisor can help alleviate some of the stress surrounding retirement by helping savers create a plan,” said Jamie Ohl, Executive Vice President, President, Retirement Plan Services, Lincoln Financial Group. “People who have a plan are more confident and better prepared for retirement.”

Preparing for retirement in your 50’s

• Don’t let your spending get out of control. People often find that their disposable income increases in their 50’s as they become empty nesters and their salaries peak. Instead of letting your spending increase in tandem, increase the amount of money you put into your retirement accounts and practice frugality — getting accustomed to a more luxurious lifestyle can make it more difficult to retire.

• Ask your employer about catch-up contributions. Most companies allow workers who are age 50 and above to contribute an extra $6,000 annually to their 401(k) on top of the regular contribution limits. 

• Don’t count on an “average” lifespan. “People are living longer than ever before, and they may not factor that into their retirement planning,” said Will Fuller, Executive Vice President, President, Annuities, Lincoln Financial Distributors and Lincoln Financial Network. “That makes outliving your savings a real concern for the millions of households in America that do not have any kind of income protection in place.”

• Consider purchasing an annuity to protect against uncertainty. Annuities provide you with a guaranteed income for life, safeguarding you against longevity risk and stock market risk. 

• Get your financial advisor to align with your expected retirement age. You may have an ideal retirement age in mind, but your financial advisor is best situated to help you determine whether it’s realistic and what you need to do to get there. 

Tips like these will make sure that you’re heading in the right direction, but there’s no substitute for talking through your own personal circumstances with a financial advisor every step of the way. You’re never too young or too old to get help from a professional — and if you’ve already followed the steps above, it will be easy for them to take you across the finish line.

Today’s author – Mark Bradstreet

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

– until next week.

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