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Tax Tip of the Week | Are You Considering Early Retirement? Maybe You Should Reconsider… July 10, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , trackback

Effects of Early Retirement

While many people look forward to retirement, after years of hard work and dedication, most people do not think about the potential physical, emotional and cognitive issues arising from the cessation of their life filled with the routine of working every day. Research suggests that early retirement may even kill you. You may think: How can that be? How can working longer be better for your health?

Early retirement offers many positive benefits. People have more time to pursue other passions and interests that they may have been longing to try. This gives them time to step away from stressful work and the high demand of work. 

Early retirees do not consider their potential unhealthy behaviors. These include being uninvolved with others, being too sedentary, over eating, and consuming too much alcohol. These factors arise because the retirees no longer have the purpose to fulfill work duties. Life as they have known it is suddenly gone.  This can lead to depression, lack of engagement, or even death. According to Richard W. Johnson, work and the work environment creates intellectual stimulation, while retirement can accelerate cognitive decline. He explains that it is important to keep the brain stimulated. 

Another risk to retirement is the possibility of becoming socially isolated. Many people do not realize the impact that a work environment can have on a person. Colleagues are there to engage and support each other, which adds significant social fulfillment to one’s life. Research suggests that avoiding social isolation by working even part time or volunteering may give retirees a longer life. Social isolation can reduce life satisfaction and affect your physical and mental health. Johnson discovered that only one-third of Americans age 55 and older will actually participate in community groups or unpaid activities. Being involved in activities or even having a part time job can provide stimulation and social interaction similar to that experienced by those who are engaged in full-employment.

Retiring early also has a significant financial impact. Some believe that this is the biggest danger to retirement. Being financially secure is something that people worry about each day while in paid employment. How much time do people think about it when they are in actual retirement? At age 62, you are eligible to receive Social Security, however, it will only cover about 40% of your paycheck. Johnson suggests that workers who remain in their careers can save some of their additional earnings for retirement and will accumulate more Social Security in the long run. 

When you turn 62…

At age 62 everyone thinks about the possibility of retiring. It is like a light bulb that goes off to indicate that you should consider taking the long break you have earned. A study by Maria Fitzpatrick at Cornell University and Timothy Moore at the University of Melbourne shows that there is a correlation between an increase in mortality rates and retirement. It states the risk factors include smoking and lack of physical activity, which are downfalls to early retirement. Many people believe they should retire by a certain age or they feel the pressure to retire early, which is a psychological effect. Johnson explains that as a society we should be encouraging older workers to stay on the job. This can boost long term health, longevity and the emotional and physical strength of the brain. Older workers are protected from age discrimination by Federal law. By allowing older workers to work longer the companies can not only benefit from the skilled workers but will enable the workers to live a longer healthier life. 

Credit given to:  Johnson, R. W. (2019, April 22). The Case Against Early Retirement. 

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

This Week’s Author – Brianna Anello

–until next week.

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