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Tax Tip of the Week | Growing up to be Entrepreneurs July 31, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

While the majority of us will spend most of our careers working for someone else, having an entrepreneurial spirit or background can open up new possibilities and ways to approach everyday life. The following article was published in the Wall Street Journal on April 28, 2019 by Molly Baker.

                              -Brianna Anello

From the very beginning, Bob Burch has exposed his children to entrepreneurship. When his first daughter, Neely, was born, Bob Burch’s first instinct was to introduce Neely to the office. So, he brought her by to show her off on their way back from the hospital. This poses the famous question on whether entrepreneurs are born or made? Throughout the Burch family this can be seen in both aspects. Entrepreneurships started with Mr. Burch and his brother Chris. They are the founders of a successful retail clothing line, Tony Burch. 

Mr. Burch believes a crucial part of becoming an entrepreneur is nurturing a sense of entrepreneurship. Immersion started at an early age for the Burch children, from encouraging local lemonade sales to teaching them what you need to start a business, to going across the country to show his family potential business ventures. They believe that entrepreneurs should be independent, creative and persistent when wanting to start their own business. These experiences have taught the Burch family lessons that they will hold close to their heart for the rest of their lives. 

Today the three oldest children are travelling the same path as their father, in becoming successful entrepreneurs. Roby, Bob’s son, will never forget his dad’s words of wisdom, “I can’t teach you how to be a lawyer, and I can’t teach you how to be a doctor. I can teach you how to be in business for yourself and how to be good at it.” The Burch children believe their parents, Bob and Susan, never really had certain hopes and dreams for their careers. Bob and Susan wanted their children to think beyond what college they wanted to attend or what they wanted to be when they grew up. They encouraged their children to think big. The process to thinking big included engaging and debating at the dinner table over work ideas. Bob explains that there is no such thing as solo effort. This process is a team effort and will enable the children to release their creativity. At the table, the children also absorbed business lingo and the strategies that they may use one day.

Entrepreneurship is about having the “ready for anything” mindset. One example Bob recalls is the most memorable turnaround story. When he was launching his first fashion show, the first truckload of products arrived and the sweaters had sleeves three inches too short. At this time, he didn’t have the time or money to replace them. Bob and his brother were on their toes. They created a design where Oxford shirt sleeves were rolled over the misfit sweater. It allowed them to showcase their go-to fashion and created opportunity to be successful and avoid potential failure. Because of this fashion show the business earned $100 million in annual sales. 

All of these lessons have influenced the Burch children’s careers. In college, Chloe and Neely pursued online ventures separately. Since they have joined forces, their handbags line is in more than 140 retailers nationwide. Their experiences have even helped their younger brother Roby. Roby is currently trying to launch a premium outdoor lifestyle brand. Bob believes that working as a team has not only created a bond between them, but will lead them to a more fulfilling life.

Credit given to:  Baker, M. (2019, April 29). A Generation of Siblings, Raised to Be Entrepreneurs. 

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

This Week’s Author – Brianna Anello

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | IRS Audit Rate Falls – Should You Relax? July 24, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Business consulting, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

I cringe every time the newspaper headlines read that the IRS audit rate is falling. My worries are that our clients may become lazy on their record keeping along with the retention of appropriate supporting business documentation (e.g. receipts, cancelled checks, deposits slips, paid bills, invoices, etc.). Thankfully, my fears have remained unfounded as the stakes are too high with the IRS to become complacent.

As a side note, many taxpayers fail to realize that if your record keeping is poor – the IRS simply won’t use your records. Instead, the IRS may consider all of your deposits as taxable income whether they were otherwise taxable or not. And, if no supporting documentation was retained then all of your expenses may be disallowed. Ouch!

On May 21, 2019, the WSJ ran an article authored by Richard Rubin, IRS’s Audit Rate Continues to Fall. This article below shares further insights on who is being audited and to what extent the IRS budget is being increased.  

                                                                    -Mark Bradstreet

WASHINGTON—The Internal Revenue Service audited just 0.59% of individual tax returns last year, marking the seventh consecutive annual decline as the tax agency copes with smaller budgets and fewer workers.

That total was down from 0.62% the year before and hit the lowest mark since 2002, according to data released Monday.

Audits of the highest-income households dropped sharply, to their lowest levels since the IRS began reporting that data in 2008. In fiscal 2018, the IRS audited 6.66% of returns of filers with more than $10 million in adjusted gross income, down from 14.52% in 2017. Among households with income between $1 million and $5 million, the audit rate dropped from 3.52% to 2.21%.

The IRS released the data as it is trying to persuade Congress to make long-run investments in the agency’s technology and enforcement staff. So far, however, key Republicans in Congress remain skeptical, and there are mixed signals about whether the government will reverse the steady decline in tax enforcement.

“I’m not averse to beefing up their budget a little bit but I want to see results,” said Sen. John Kennedy (R., La.), who heads the subcommittee that oversees the IRS budget. “I’ve got a lot of confidence in the new commissioner and in the new secretary, but I’m not into just throwing money at the wall because the bureaucracy says we need more.”

President Trump has proposed boosting the IRS’s budget by 1.5% for the fiscal year that starts Oct. 1, to $11.5 billion from $11.3 billion, including a down payment on improving the agency’s technology.

The administration also is proposing a $15 billion, decadelong increase in IRS enforcement funding, which the agency says would generate $47 billion in additional federal revenue. That net gain of more than $30 billion would come from enforcing existing laws.

The IRS has been shrinking steadily, partly because electronic filing has increased its efficiency. But many of the recent changes have stemmed from Republican spending cuts after they took control of the House in 2011 and after the IRS said in 2013 that it had improperly scrutinized some conservative nonprofit groups.

Adjusted for inflation, the 2019 IRS budget is smaller than in 2000 and is 19% below peak funding in 2010, according to the Government Accountability Office. The agency’s workforce declined 4% in 2018 and is now 21% below where it was eight years ago, and the number of examiners that performs audits shrunk 38% from 2010 to 2017, according to the agency’s inspector general. Those cuts came as Congress handed the IRS more responsibility to administer the Affordable Care Act and police offshore bank accounts.

Declining IRS resources contributed to the decline in audits but weren’t the only cause, said David Kautter, assistant Treasury secretary for tax policy, who was acting IRS commissioner for much of fiscal 2018.

“In this age of technology, it’s easier to identify areas of noncompliance,” he said Monday.

Democrats say the IRS budget cuts are disproportionately benefiting high-income households.

“Republicans in the Senate and the House have been very much geared towards a policy that has produced lots of poor people being audited and lots of well-off people basically getting off the hook,” said Sen. Ron Wyden (D., Ore.), the top Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee. “It takes more resources. There’s no way around it.”

Mr. Kennedy said he wants more details on the IRS modernization plans, pointing to the agency’s difficulties overhauling its technology.

Sen. James Lankford (R., Okla.) said he wants more updated information on the tax gap—the difference between taxes owed and taxes paid—which should be released in the coming months.

“We need to be able to see it and know what we actually could get a return on, from enforcement,” he said.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates that an extra $20 billion spent on IRS enforcement could yield $55 billion over the next decade and more beyond that as audits generate revenue. Once the IRS completed staff training and computer upgrades, the government could get as much as $5.20 in additional revenue for every $1 spent, according to CBO.

The agency started 2,886 criminal investigations in 2018, down from 5,234 just five years earlier, according to the agency’s inspector general. The IRS criminal investigations unit had 26% fewer special agents than it did in 2012.

The IRS also has fewer employees working to collect taxes from people who already owe. Each collections officer generates about $2 million a year, which means the smaller IRS is leaving $3.3 billion a year on the table, just from collections, according to the agency’s inspector general.

Tax experts say the agency’s performance could be improved through better taxpayer service and a simpler tax system. So would rules that gave the IRS more information about sources of income—such as profits from cash businesses—that they lack now.

Taxpayers are extremely likely to comply with tax rules when the IRS independently has access to information about their finances. Wages reported on Form W-2 almost always show up on tax returns. When the IRS doesn’t have withholding payments or information, people are more likely to underreport their income.

“I don’t believe the solution is more agents, more audits and more intrusive government into taxpayers,” said Rep. Kevin Brady (R., Texas), the top Republican on the House Ways and Means Committee. “I think it’s smarter audits.”

But the drops in enforcement and the IRS budget have run in tandem, and the nonpartisan estimates from CBO, GAO and the IRS inspector general say reversing the spending cuts would generate money.

“We’re just in never-never land here. The IRS has had its capacity to do its job attacked. There’s no other way to say it,” Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D., Ore.) said at a recent hearing. “They can’t keep pace with what they’re up against.”

Credit given to:  Richard Rubin. This article was written May 20, 2019. You can write to Richard Rubin at richard.rubin@wsj.com

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author – Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | What May Be The Best Investment Ever? July 17, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Uncategorized , add a comment

Longer ago than I care to admit, a client gave me some sage advice that I have never been able to improve upon. His father had told him that the best investment you can ever make is in yourself. One reason being is that there is no other investment that you will have ever more control over. I have found this advice to be very profound and useful.

Ted Jenkin, co-CEO and founder of oXYGen Financial offers further thoughts on this topic as published in the WSJ on June 17, 2019.  

                                -Mark Bradstreet

Invest 2% of your income in you

When we think about investments, we often direct our attention to categories such as stocks, bonds and real estate. What we often don’t think about is our most valuable asset: our ability to earn an income and to make that income grow faster.

Almost 20 years ago, I met a successful business owner who gave me a simple lesson: Invest 2% of everything you earn annually back into your ability to grow your income.

What does this mean exactly? Investing in you is like diversifying your portfolio of investments. You might take a chance and invest in that side hustle you think could be a business. Take a training course or advanced education that could further your current career. Invest in a personal coach who could improve your business performance. It could mean investing in an exercise or nutrition program that could give you more stamina every day to accomplish more.

It’s the best advice I’ve ever received—and I do it every single year.

Credit given to:  Ted Jenkin, co-CEO and founder of oXYGen Financial

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

This Week’s Author – Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | Are You Considering Early Retirement? Maybe You Should Reconsider… July 10, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Effects of Early Retirement

While many people look forward to retirement, after years of hard work and dedication, most people do not think about the potential physical, emotional and cognitive issues arising from the cessation of their life filled with the routine of working every day. Research suggests that early retirement may even kill you. You may think: How can that be? How can working longer be better for your health?

Early retirement offers many positive benefits. People have more time to pursue other passions and interests that they may have been longing to try. This gives them time to step away from stressful work and the high demand of work. 

Early retirees do not consider their potential unhealthy behaviors. These include being uninvolved with others, being too sedentary, over eating, and consuming too much alcohol. These factors arise because the retirees no longer have the purpose to fulfill work duties. Life as they have known it is suddenly gone.  This can lead to depression, lack of engagement, or even death. According to Richard W. Johnson, work and the work environment creates intellectual stimulation, while retirement can accelerate cognitive decline. He explains that it is important to keep the brain stimulated. 

Another risk to retirement is the possibility of becoming socially isolated. Many people do not realize the impact that a work environment can have on a person. Colleagues are there to engage and support each other, which adds significant social fulfillment to one’s life. Research suggests that avoiding social isolation by working even part time or volunteering may give retirees a longer life. Social isolation can reduce life satisfaction and affect your physical and mental health. Johnson discovered that only one-third of Americans age 55 and older will actually participate in community groups or unpaid activities. Being involved in activities or even having a part time job can provide stimulation and social interaction similar to that experienced by those who are engaged in full-employment.

Retiring early also has a significant financial impact. Some believe that this is the biggest danger to retirement. Being financially secure is something that people worry about each day while in paid employment. How much time do people think about it when they are in actual retirement? At age 62, you are eligible to receive Social Security, however, it will only cover about 40% of your paycheck. Johnson suggests that workers who remain in their careers can save some of their additional earnings for retirement and will accumulate more Social Security in the long run. 

When you turn 62…

At age 62 everyone thinks about the possibility of retiring. It is like a light bulb that goes off to indicate that you should consider taking the long break you have earned. A study by Maria Fitzpatrick at Cornell University and Timothy Moore at the University of Melbourne shows that there is a correlation between an increase in mortality rates and retirement. It states the risk factors include smoking and lack of physical activity, which are downfalls to early retirement. Many people believe they should retire by a certain age or they feel the pressure to retire early, which is a psychological effect. Johnson explains that as a society we should be encouraging older workers to stay on the job. This can boost long term health, longevity and the emotional and physical strength of the brain. Older workers are protected from age discrimination by Federal law. By allowing older workers to work longer the companies can not only benefit from the skilled workers but will enable the workers to live a longer healthier life. 

Credit given to:  Johnson, R. W. (2019, April 22). The Case Against Early Retirement. 

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

This Week’s Author – Brianna Anello

–until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | Retirees July 3, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, tax changes, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Everywhere you turn whether it is your doctor’s office or the WSJ or wherever, we see thought-provoking, often mind-numbing articles on the pros and the cons of retiring. Well, the article that follows is one from the WSJ written by Cheryl Winokur Munk. She delves into some of the more commonly made errors made by retirees. We have noticed many of these errors made by our friends and neighbors but of course we would never commit any of them ourselves.

                               -Mark Bradstreet

There are almost as many paths to retirement as there are retirees. But when it comes to financial mistakes that can derail their retirement, familiar patterns often emerge. Many retirees tend to invest too conservatively, spend too much too soon, pay too much in taxes or fall for too-good-to-be-true investments.

Retirees could ensure their nest egg lasts longer by avoiding these common mistakes:

Mistake No. 1: Investing too conservatively

A number of retirees try to eliminate risk by stashing their savings in cash, certificates of deposit or municipal bonds of very short duration. Though taking a more conservative approach in retirement can be prudent, playing it too safe can severely limit retirees’ earning potential, increasing the chances they’ll run out of money.

“It’s important to build a portfolio that incorporates an appropriate mix of fixed income and equities based on their other assets—including Social Security and rental income—their spending requirements and their life expectancy,” says David Savir, chief executive of Element Pointe Advisors, a registered investment adviser in Miami. The average American man will live to age 76, and the average American woman to age 81, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Mr. Savir recommends retirees build a portfolio to match their spending habits and estimated life expectancy—taking into account the national averages as well as their own health and family history—and test it using forward-looking simulations. Those simulations should take into account bear-market scenarios and the chance that returns may be lower—and volatility higher—than historical norms. “This will help a client determine whether they need to spend less, invest slightly more aggressively, or both,” he says.

Mistake No. 2: Spending mishaps

Some retirees shell out significant sums of money early in their retirement, often to pay off debt or enjoy leisure activities they couldn’t do while working. The problem with spending so much in the beginning is that it can be detrimental to a retiree’s long-term financial security, says Tim Sullivan, chief executive of Strategic Wealth Advisors Group, a registered investment adviser in Shelby Township, Mich.

While eliminating debt can be a good thing, large cash outlays can harm retirees’ long-term financial security. It may make even less sense when a retiree’s investments are earning far more than the rate of interest on the debt, Mr. Sullivan says. And while it’s understandable to want to buy a second house, take a pricey European vacation or remodel a home, retirees need to map out the potential lasting effects such hefty spending can have on their finances, Mr. Sullivan says.

He tells of a client in his late 50s who enjoyed a $25,000 African safari so much that upon his return he immediately booked another $20,000 trip. These purchases put such a dent in his nest egg that he risked running out of money six years earlier than expected and had to follow a strict budget to try to minimize the damage, Mr. Sullivan says.

Of course, retirees have to find the right balance, because being too strict with their spending early in retirement can lead to significant regrets later on. Beyond that, there’s a risk for some retirees that by being so frugal they’ll leave so much behind when they die that they will be over the federal or state estate-tax exemption limit, says Alison Hutchinson, senior vice president of private wealth management at Brown Brothers Harriman. They could also end up leaving more to their heirs than they are comfortable with, she says.

Mistake No. 3: Underestimating expenses

Advisers say it’s typical for retirees to underestimate their expenses in retirement, particularly health-care and other periodic, rather than regular, expenses. These incremental expenses—if not built into the budget—can derail a retiree’s financial security, advisers say.

Leslie Thompson, managing principal at Spectrum Management Group, a registered investment adviser in Indianapolis, recommends that people approaching retirement keep track of their expenses for at least a year, ideally two or three, before they leave the workforce, so they have a baseline to work with. They should then make the necessary tweaks to account for expenses they will no longer have and new expenses they may incur during retirement. “A well-thought-out plan should be based upon actual spending needs and future desires, with contingencies for nonrecurring items such as car purchases, major home repairs and remodels, and rising health-care costs,” she says.

Financial support for adult children and grandchildren is another expense that many retirees will want to build into their budget. Many retirees are happy to assist on an as-needed basis, but, to their detriment, they don’t consider the aggregate annual cost, says Alicia Waltenberger, director of wealth planning strategies at TIAA. “A lot of times when they see that collective number, it is eye-opening,” she says.

Mistake No. 4: Creating unnecessary tax expenses

When retirees have both tax-sheltered and taxable accounts, they commonly withdraw exclusively from their taxable account at first. The danger is that growth within the tax-sheltered account could bump the retiree to a higher tax bracket once required minimum distributions kick in, says Paul Lightfoot, president of Optima Asset Management, a registered investment adviser in Dallas. This could also affect the retiree’s Medicare premiums, he says.

Mr. Lightfoot recommends retirees perform yearly assessments using different tax scenarios to determine how best to optimize their accounts. One option may be to take some withdrawals from their tax-deferred account before they turn 70½, provided this doesn’t push them to a higher tax bracket. They might also consider converting some of their taxable-account savings to a Roth IRA because of anticipated tax rates in the future. While there are taxable consequences in the year of conversion, there may be longer-term tax benefits in a conversion, he says.

Mistake No. 5: Falling for investment pitches that are too good to be true

Many retirees are easily swayed by the prospect of finding high-returning investments that have little to no risk, but chasing yield can easily derail the savings they’ve worked hard to build, advisers say. Some advisers are particularly skeptical of products like indexed annuities for retirees, because many people don’t understand the products and think they are getting something they are not.

Dennis Stearns, founder of Stearns Financial Group, a registered investment adviser in Greensboro, N.C., also cautions retirees to pay attention to the fees they pay for investment management. Generally, clients with $500,000 to $5 million in assets should pay in the range of 0.5% to 1% in adviser fees, and keep other custodial fees and ETF and mutual-fund fees low, he says. If they’re paying more for investment management, it might be advisable to rethink the relationship. “The fees can really eat into your retirement savings,” he says.

Credit Given to: Cheryl Winokur Munk. Ms. Winokur Munk is a writer in West Orange, N.J. She can be reached at reports@wsj.com.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We also welcome and appreciate anyone who wishes to write a Tax Tip of the Week for our consideration. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.  

This Week’s Author – Mark Bradstreet, CPA

–until next week.