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Tax Tip of the Week | Trusts – The Very Basics April 3, 2019

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes , trackback

While a trust may be considered an “entity”, it is actually a fiduciary relationship whereby a trustee holds legal title to property and has a duty to manage that property for the benefit of others (known as beneficiaries).

A trust is formed by a trust agreement. There are many types and purposes of trusts, so the trust agreement has to be written specifically to accommodate the goals of the one setting up the trust who is known as the grantor. Once the trust has been set up, the grantor, also referred to as the settlor, or trustor, can then transfer property to the trust to be managed by the trustee.

A trust can be revocable, or irrevocable. A revocable trust, sometimes referred to as a living trust, is generally set up by a grantor who is also the trustee and beneficiary, and who retains the power to revoke or amend the trust. These trusts are legal entities, but are disregarded for federal tax purposes. In fact, they usually use the social security number of the grantor, and all income is reported on the grantor’s tax return. As such, a revocable trust does not file its own return.

On the other hand, an irrevocable trust does usually need to file a tax return, and, depending on the trust agreement, any tax due will be paid by the trust, or by the beneficiaries, or in some cases, by both the trust and the beneficiaries. It is usually better tax-wise if the beneficiaries pay the tax due to the short tax brackets applicable to trusts (and estates). The highest tax rate for a trust is the same as an individual’s, 37% for 2018. However, the highest tax bracket for an individual for 2018 begins at a taxable income of $500,000, while the highest bracket for a trust begins at $12,500. Trusts can also be taxable at the state level. For Ohio, trust rules are governed by the Ohio Trust Code which was enacted January 1, 2007.

There are several reasons for setting up trusts. One is to avoid probate. Revocable living trusts are generally used for this purpose. A trust can help your estate retain privacy whereas the probate process creates a public record. In addition, probate fees can be significant.

Another reason for a trust is to help preserve estate exemptions. A-B trusts, also known as bypass or marital trusts, can be used for this purpose. Other types of trusts used for marital purposes include the QTIP Trust and the Power of Appointment Trust.

Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts (ILIT’s) are used to prevent the taxability of life insurance within an estate. Dynasty Trusts are used to preserve assets for children and grandchildren or other beneficiaries. Incentive trusts can be used to encourage the behavior of beneficiaries, such as getting a college degree, or to address specific problems such as drug abuse. Special needs trusts can be set up for a physically or mentally disabled child. Spendthrift trusts can provide protection from creditors. Spendthrift clauses can be used in other types of trusts as well. Some additional types of trusts include the charitable remainder, charitable lead, Medicaid trusts, grantor retained annuity trusts, and numerous others.

The taxability of these trusts rests with the trust agreement. Before the trust agreement can be drafted, various questions must be answered. Some of the more important ones are:

•    How much control do I want?
•    Who will be the trustee and can the trustee be trusted?
•    Can I fire the trustee and name a new one?
•    Do I want to be able to revoke, or amend the trust?
•    Can I change the beneficiaries?
•    Do I want the income to be distributed?

As you can see, trusts and their taxation are very complicated. If you are considering setting up a trust, please seek the help of an attorney and a tax professional.

Thank you for all of your questions, comments and suggestions for future topics. As always, they are much appreciated. We may be reached in our Dayton office at 937-436-3133 or in our Xenia office at 937-372-3504. Or, visit our website.

This Week’s Author – Norman S Hicks, CPA

–until next week.

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