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Tax Tip of the Week | No. 440 | Happy New Year! December 27, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Dec 27, 2017 | No. 440 | Happy New Year!

And get ready for the tax filing season.

Hopefully, you followed some of the suggestions we outlined earlier in TTW #21 to organize your records. If you did, great! This will make filing your tax returns a lot easier this year. It also means that you and your tax advisor can spend more time on tax and financial planning issues for 2018 vs. looking back to 2017.

This week we will look at some of the more common forms that you should be watching for in the coming weeks and months:

W-2:    Employers should mail these by 1/31/18.  If you have moved during the year, make sure former employers are aware of your new address.

W-2G:    Casinos, Lottery Commissions and other gambling entities should mail these by 1/31/18 if you have gambling winnings above a certain threshold. Note: Some casinos will issue you a W-2G at the time you win a jackpot. Make sure you have saved those throughout the year.

1096:    Compilation sheet that shows the totals of the information returns that you are physically mailing to the IRS. The check box for Form 1099-H was removed from line 6, while a check box for Form 1098-Q was added to line 6. The spacing for all check boxes on line 6 was expanded. The amounts reported in Box 13 of Form 1099-INT should now be included in box 5 of Form 1096 when filing Form 1099-INT to the IRS.

1098-C :    You might receive this form if you made contributions of motor vehicles, boats, or airplanes to a qualified charitable organization. A donee organization must file a separate Form 1098-C with the IRS for each contribution of a qualified vehicle that has a claimed value of more than $500. All filers of this form may truncate a donor’s identification number (social security number, individual taxpayer identification number, adoption taxpayer identification number, or employer identification number), on written acknowledgements. Truncation is not allowed, however, on any documents the filer files with the IRS.

1099-MISC :    This form reports the total paid during the year to a single person or entity for services provided. Certain Medicaid waiver payments may be excludable from the income as difficulty of care payments. A new check box was added to this form to identify a foreign financial institution filing this form to satisfy its Chapter 4 reporting requirement.

1099-INT:    This form is used to report interest income paid by banks and other financial institutions. Box 13 was added to report bond premium on tax-exempt bonds. All later boxes were renumbered. A new check box was added to this form to identify a foreign financial institution filing this form to satisfy its Chapter 4 reporting requirement.

1099-DIV:    This form is issued to those who have received dividends from stocks. A new check box was added to this form to identify a foreign financial institution filing this form to satisfy its Chapter 4 reporting requirement.

1099-B:     This form is issued by a broker or barter exchange that summarizes the proceeds of sales transactions. For a sale of a debt instrument that is a wash sale and has accrued market discount, a code “W” should be displayed in box 1f and the amount of the wash sale loss disallowed in box 1g.

1099-K:    This form is given to those merchants accepting payment card transactions. Completion of box 1b (Card Not Present transactions) is now mandatory.

K-1s:    If you are a partner, member or shareholder in a partnership or S corporation, your income and expenses will be reported to you on a K-1. The tax returns for these entities are not due until 3/15/18 (if they have a calendar-year accounting). Sometimes, you may not receive a K-1 until shortly after the entity’s tax return is filed in March.

If you are a beneficiary of an estate or trust, your share of the income and expenses for the year will also be reported on a K-1. These returns will be due 4/17/18 so you might not receive your K-1 before the due date of your Form 1040.

NOTE:  Many times corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts will put their tax returns on extension. If they do, the due date of the return is not until 9/15/18 or later. We often see client’s receiving K-1s in the third week of September.

If you receive, or expect to receive, a K-1 close to or after the due date of Form 1040,  it is best if you place your personal return on extension. It is a lot easier to extend your return than it is to amend your return after receiving a K-1 later in the year.

1098:    This form is sent by banks or other lenders to provide the amount of mortgage interest paid on mortgage loans. The form might also show real estate taxes paid and other useful information related to the loan.

1098-T:    This form is provided by educational institutions and shows the amounts paid or billed for tuition, scholarships received, and other educational information. These amounts are needed to calculate educational credits that may be taken on your returns.

So start watching your mailbox and put all of these statements you receive in that new file you created!

Wishing you all great things,

The Staff at Bradstreet & Company

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 439 | Special Holiday Edition December 20, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Deadlines, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Dec 20, 2017 | No. 439 | Special Holiday Edition…

Enjoy the Holidays!

We are going to take a break from our tax and business tips this week. Instead, the family of Bradstreet & Company would like to wish you and your family the most joyous holiday season and best wishes for 2018.

We hope you enjoy the Tax Tip of The Week. As always, your topic suggestions and questions are always appreciated.

Is the Tax Tip of the Week real?
While your kids are questioning if Santa is real, we continue to receive some interesting feedback that some of you don’t realize this is really Bradstreet CPAs reaching out each week (… some suspect this is a “packaged” communication to which we add our logo.) Well, rest assured it’s us and we love to hear from you.

Enjoy the week and, “Yes Virgina, there is a Santa Claus”.

Wishing you all great things,

The Staff at Bradstreet & Company

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 438 | Planning For The New Proposed Tax Bill December 14, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, tax changes, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Preparation, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Dec 14, 2017 | No. 438 | Planning For The New Proposed Tax Bill

2017 is coming to a close with sweeping new tax legislation on the horizon. While the changes don’t take effect until 2018. We want to alert you to some steps you might take before year-end to preserve the best possible tax results.

As you explore these ideas, mostly you will find they contain a common and time-tested theme: where possible, defer income and accelerate the payment of deductible expenses. The reason for relying on this oldest of strategies is because ordinary income tax rates should be lower next year and many expenses will either no longer be deductible or will be less valuable in light of higher standard deductions in 2018.

1.    Maximize retirement deferrals. Be sure to fully fund your 401(k) and/or IRA to further reduce gross income for 2017. We can further discuss during the tax season fully funding 2017 SEPs and other retirement accounts that can be funded up to April 15 (or later).
2.    Business owners and consultants should delay billing. It isn’t proper to simply delay depositing checks received before year-end, but you generally won’t be paid for amounts you haven’t billed. Shift that mid- to late-December billing out until January 1 (for cash basis taxpayers).
3.    Prepay state income tax. This deduction may be eliminated beginning in 2018, so pay the fourth quarter estimate that is dated January 2018 by December 31, 2017. This strategy, however, requires that you know your status regarding alternative minimum tax (AMT). If you will be subject to AMT in 2017, it is likely that prepaying your state taxes will not reduce your 2017 taxes. In that case, with no benefit in either year, it makes better financial sense to make the payment later.
4.    Prepay property taxes. The deduction for property taxes is likely to be limited to $10,000 beginning in 2018. To the extent that you already have an assessment that isn’t due until after the first of next year, pay it by December 31. For taxpayers with high property tax bills and other large deductions such as mortgage interest and contributions, accelerating the 2018 property tax payment into 2017 may save a deduction due to disappear next year. Mid-range taxpayers may need a projection to see if this makes sense. And here again, the strategy won’t work for those in AMT in 2017.
5.    Bunching strategies. With the standard deductions possibly doubling in 2018, lower itemizers will need to begin to incorporate strategies to bunch deductible expenses every other year to “pop up” over the standard deduction and preserve tax benefits. In this case, you might warn your favorite charities as you contribute this year-end that your next contribution might not occur until January 2019. In that way, you can make double contributions at the beginning and end of 2019 to achieve deductions above the standard deduction that year.
6.    Make donations directly from IRA. If you are 70½ or older but your donations do not bring you over the new higher standard deduction, make those donations directly from your IRA as a custodial transfer.
7.    Delay business asset acquisition. First-year bonus depreciation for brand new assets may be 100% in 2018 (up from 50% in 2017). You may want to delay capital expenditures to take advantage of the more complete write-off on the acquisition.
8.    Complete trade-ins of business equipment, machinery, and autos before year-end. Section 1031 like-kind exchanges will only be available on real property beginning in 2018. If you have other business assets with low or no basis that you were considering trading in on the purchase of new, complete the transaction and place the new assets in service before year-end if possible.
9.    Complete large capital gains sales and prepay the state tax. You may want to accelerate this type of income into 2017 as long as it is accompanied by the payment of state tax. With capital gains rates remaining virtually the same under the new law, the net after-tax result can be better this year.

Individual situations are unique, and there are no one-size-fits-all tax planning strategies. If you would like to discuss these or other ideas that apply to your particular circumstances, please feel free to contact us.

With respect and encouragement,

The Staff at Bradstreet, CPAs

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 437 | What Happens to My Federal Income Taxes if I Sell My Rental? December 13, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, General, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Dec 13, 2017 | No. 437 | What Happens to My Federal Income Taxes if I Sell My Rental?

One of the biggest tax surprises of our clients arises from the income tax liability caused by the sale of their rental property.

Here is how such a surprise typically unfolds:

The daughter heads off to college. Cash is needed for her tuition. Mom and dad decide to raise cash by selling their rental property. They paid $100,000 for this property which has now been rented for about fourteen (14) years. Net of selling expenses, the rental property is sold for $100,000. So far so good. The net sales price and the purchase price were identical. Mom and dad would have liked to sell the property for more but it is what it is. At least from a tax standpoint, mom and dad think they are home free – no gain, no income taxes. WRONG! They forgot to consider the depreciation expense that was taken over the fourteen (14) year holding period. That expense amounts to $45,000. So now, instead of the property basis or net book value being $100,000 as they guessed; it is $55,000 or the $100,000 less the depreciation expense already taken of $45,000. Now mom and dad’s taxable gain has climbed to $45,000. Mom and dad are not happy! Uncle Sam is going to take a chunk of their monies planned for tuition. Hmmmm…not good!

Now let’s look at how the federal income tax is calculated.  Since the property had been held for more than one year, the gain is a long term capital gain. However, this type of capital gain on the depreciation recapture may be taxed as high as 25%. Had the sales price exceeded the purchase price – conventional capital gain rates would have applied instead but only for that difference including the gain on the land portion. So their federal income tax may be as high as 25% of $45,000 or $11,250 – all resulting from the depreciation recapture. Not a pleasant surprise!

Always, know what your tax consequences may be before embarking down a road.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

This week’s author….Mark Bradstreet, CPA

…until next week.

Tax Tip of the Week | No. 436 | Do You Need Tax Planning or Business Consulting? December 6, 2017

Posted by bradstreetblogger in : Deductions, Tax Planning Tips, Tax Tip, Taxes, Uncategorized , add a comment

Tax Tip of the Week | Dec 6, 2017 | No. 436 | Do You Need Tax Planning or Business Consulting?

As the year end draws near – the usual hosts of magazines, newspapers and the internet will all be busy with age-old articles on tax planning. Most will be repeating essentially the same techniques as they have for the last thirty (30) plus years.

And that is not to take away from these strategies – most are quite valid and very useful. Tax planning is important! Do it! Deferring income taxes is always a good thing. And, if the tax deferral is for a long enough period of time; then, in certain situations those deferred income taxes might be eliminated with your demise.

However, what does one do when a tax liability does not exist because your business and/or other adverse personal events resulted in tax losses and little tax liability? Then, one removes the tax planning hat and instead puts on their business consulting hat. With that hat comes a new mission with a new set of questions:

1.    Do I have the right people?
2.    Do I have the right customers?
3.    Are incentives aligned with my business goals?
4.    Are my assumptions still reasonable?
5.    Am I outsourcing the right tasks?
6.    Am I measuring the right things?
7.    Were our sales on goal?
8.    How am I different than my competition?
9.    Am I really optimizing technology?
10.    Am I stressed out?
11.    Were our gross profit margins on goal?
12.    What is our accounts receivable turnover?
13.    Am I avoiding the really tough decisions?
14.    What is our inventory turnover?
15.    Are we committed?
16.    What is our accounts payable aging?
17.    What is our capital assets budget?
18.    On a day-to-day basis, can the business function without me?
19.    Do we have adequate capital to take the business where we want it to go?
20.    Etc., etc., etc.

And, provided you arrive at the right answers for these questions and implement the answers according to your strategic plan; then next year you will also be wearing a tax planning hat as well. A good business person will always be wearing both hats along with some others.

You can contact us in Dayton at 937-436-3133 and in Xenia at 937-372-3504. Or visit our website.

This week’s author….Mark Bradstreet, CPA

…until next week.